confide

verb
con·​fide | \ kən-ˈfīd How to pronounce confide (audio) \
confided; confiding

Definition of confide

intransitive verb

1 : to have confidence : trust We cannot confide wholly in our own powers.
2 : to show confidence by imparting secrets confide in a friend

transitive verb

1 : to tell confidentially He dared not confide the secret to his family.
2 : to give to the care or protection of another : entrust … do not confide your children to strangers.— Mavis Gallant

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Other Words from confide

confider noun

Choose the Right Synonym for confide

commit, entrust, confide, consign, relegate mean to assign to a person or place for a definite purpose. commit may express the general idea of delivering into another's charge or the special sense of transferring to a superior power or to a special place of custody. committed the felon to prison entrust implies committing with trust and confidence. the president is entrusted with broad powers confide implies entrusting with great assurance or reliance. confided complete control of my affairs to my attorney consign suggests removing from one's control with formality or finality. consigned the damaging notes to the fire relegate implies a consigning to a particular class or sphere often with a suggestion of getting rid of. relegated to an obscure position in the company

Examples of confide in a Sentence

He confided that he was very unhappy with his job. the local SPCA was looking for homes for a number of exotic animals confided to its care
Recent Examples on the Web Having an adult presence outside the home to confide in would have changed her girlhood. Michelle Theriault Boots, Anchorage Daily News, "The teacher who returned to the rural Alaska village where she was abused is not staying silent," 6 June 2020 Who wants to confide in someone who doesn’t understand you? Jessica Marie Garcia, refinery29.com, "On My Block’s Jessica Marie Garcia: My Hollywood Dreams Revealed My Mother’s Worst Nightmare," 13 July 2020 As the next two to three weeks pass by, your friendly attitude might attract strangers who confide in you and acquaintances who are eager to share their interests. Magi Helena, oregonlive, "Horoscope for July 7, 2020: Taurus, steer clear of temptation; Libra, don’t fall for the hard sell," 7 July 2020 Having an adult presence outside the home to confide in would have changed her girlhood. Michelle Theriault Boots, Anchorage Daily News, "The teacher who returned to the rural Alaska village where she was abused is not staying silent," 6 June 2020 Having an adult presence outside the home to confide in would have changed her girlhood. Michelle Theriault Boots, Anchorage Daily News, "The teacher who returned to the rural Alaska village where she was abused is not staying silent," 6 June 2020 Having an adult presence outside the home to confide in would have changed her girlhood. Michelle Theriault Boots, Anchorage Daily News, "The teacher who returned to the rural Alaska village where she was abused is not staying silent," 6 June 2020 Madrigal-Dersch claims that an area in which telemedicine has inferior quality is in providing the privacy that some patients need to confide in their physicians. David Hogberg, Washington Examiner, "Coronavirus boosted use of telemedicine," 4 June 2020 Having an adult presence outside the home to confide in would have changed her girlhood. Michelle Theriault Boots, ProPublica, "The Teacher Who Returned to the Small Village Where She was Abused is Not Staying Silent," 6 June 2011

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'confide.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of confide

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for confide

early Scots, borrowed from Latin confīdere "to put trust in, have confidence in," from con- con- + fīdere "to trust (in), rely (on)" going back to Indo-European *bhei̯dh- "trust, entrust" — more at faith entry 1

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Learn More about confide

Time Traveler for confide

Time Traveler

The first known use of confide was in the 15th century

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Statistics for confide

Last Updated

2 Aug 2020

Cite this Entry

“Confide.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/confide. Accessed 14 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for confide

confide

verb
How to pronounce confide (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of confide

: to tell (something that is secret or private) to someone you trust

confide

verb
con·​fide | \ kən-ˈfīd How to pronounce confide (audio) \
confided; confiding

Kids Definition of confide

1 : to have or show faith confide in a doctor's skill
2 : to display trust by telling secrets She needed to confide in a friend.
3 : to tell without anyone else knowing I confided the secret to a pal.
4 : entrust sense 2 The property was confided to their care.

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More from Merriam-Webster on confide

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for confide

Spanish Central: Translation of confide

Nglish: Translation of confide for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of confide for Arabic Speakers

Comments on confide

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