concede

verb
con·​cede | \ kən-ˈsēd How to pronounce concede (audio) \
conceded; conceding

Definition of concede

transitive verb

1a(1) : to acknowledge grudgingly or hesitantly conceded that it might be a good idea
(2) : to relinquish grudgingly or hesitantly concede power
b : to accept as true, valid, or accurate The right of the state to tax is generally conceded.
2 : to grant as a right or privilege Britain conceded the independence of the colonies.

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Other Words from concede

concededly \ kən-​ˈsē-​dəd-​lē How to pronounce concededly (audio) \ adverb
conceder noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for concede

Synonyms

Antonyms

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Choose the Right Synonym for concede

grant, concede, vouchsafe, accord, award mean to give as a favor or a right. grant implies giving to a claimant or petitioner something that could be withheld. granted them a new hearing concede implies yielding something reluctantly in response to a rightful or compelling claim. even her critics concede she can be charming vouchsafe implies granting something as a courtesy or an act of gracious condescension. vouchsafed the secret to only a few chosen disciples accord implies giving to another what is due or proper. accorded all the honors befitting a head of state award implies giving what is deserved or merited usually after a careful weighing of pertinent factors. awarded the company a huge defense contract

Politics and Concede

After the votes have been counted, one candidate traditionally concedes the election to his or her opponent by giving a concession speech. If you're lucky, your boss will concede that she was wrong the last time she criticized you. But in the middle of an argument, we're not all so good at conceding that the other guy might have a good point.

Examples of concede in a Sentence

… he conceded that with six kids, something like this was bound to happen. At least one of them had to be a bad egg. — Markus Zusak, The Book Thief, 2005 … it was generally conceded that Caepio, if and when tried for treason under the present system, would be acquitted. — Colleen McCullough, The First Man in Rome, (1990) 1991 … after listening to Tom, he conceded that there were some conspicuous advantages about a life of crime, and so he consented to be a pirate. — Mark Twain, Tom Sawyer, 1876 I concede that the work has been slow so far, but it should speed up soon. “Your plan might work,” she conceded, “but I still think mine is better.” Although it seems clear that he has lost the election, he still refuses to concede. He's not ready to concede the election. The former ruler was forced to concede power to a new government. The company says that workers are not conceding enough in negotiations.
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Recent Examples on the Web But just like pretty much everything else this year, Savage's creation had to concede to the realities of coronavirus. Sam Machkovech, Ars Technica, "Hump!, the online porn fest that wouldn’t have happened without quarantine," 26 June 2020 Union officials concede that the pandemic spells hard times for New York hotel owners, but argue that operators have thrived over the past decade, and can afford to embrace measures that protect workers and promote travel. Patrick Clark, Bloomberg.com, "NYC Hotels Battered by Pandemic Face Rift Over Safety Rules," 14 June 2020 Republicans concede voting rights could deliver extra votes for Democrats and help Biden overcome a lack of enthusiasm. David M. Drucker, Washington Examiner, "'Scares me to death': Georgia Republicans fret voting access issue could sink Trump," 12 June 2020 As Lavelle conceded in a message posted to Twitter on Sunday, her social commentary was a departure from the typically lighthearted tone of her social media presence. Pat Brennan, Cincinnati.com, "Rose Lavelle: I stand with the black community in this fight," 1 June 2020 With an improbable amount of luck, a coronavirus might take on the mutations needed to infect humans while being cultured in a lab, the researchers conceded. Los Angeles Times, "Was the coronavirus made in a Wuhan lab? Here’s what the genetic evidence shows," 9 May 2020 The cold came up again in 2014 in talks in Vienna with Saudi negotiators, and in 2016 as Russia initially pushed back on a production-cutting deal with OPEC before conceding to a small reduction. Andrew E. Kramer, BostonGlobe.com, "Too cold for an oil cut? Russia’s move reveals a long-running bluff," 4 May 2020 Similar to previous attempts by the state to withhold certain information during its fight against the coronavirus, officials eventually reversed course by conceding that the information was valuable to the public. USA TODAY, "Fast food jam, virtual Derby, mask seizures: News from around our 50 states," 24 Apr. 2020 With many states pushing their primaries until June due to health concerns, Bernie Sanders shows no signs of conceding and has been using his own online social network to host coronavirus town halls. CBS News, "Stay-at-home candidate: Joe Biden competes with White House on message," 25 Mar. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'concede.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of concede

1626, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 2

History and Etymology for concede

French or Latin; French concéder, from Latin concedere, from com- + cedere to yield

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Time Traveler for concede

Time Traveler

The first known use of concede was in 1626

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Statistics for concede

Last Updated

4 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Concede.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/concede. Accessed 13 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for concede

concede

verb
How to pronounce concede (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of concede

: to say that you accept or do not deny the truth or existence of (something) : to admit (something) usually in an unwilling way
: to admit that you have been defeated and stop trying to win
: to give away (something) usually in an unwilling way

concede

verb
con·​cede | \ kən-ˈsēd How to pronounce concede (audio) \
conceded; conceding

Kids Definition of concede

1 : to admit to be true The candidate had to concede defeat.
2 : to grant or yield usually unwillingly Britain conceded the independence of the colonies.

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More from Merriam-Webster on concede

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for concede

Spanish Central: Translation of concede

Nglish: Translation of concede for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of concede for Arabic Speakers

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