clamor

noun
clam·​or | \ ˈkla-mər How to pronounce clamor (audio) \

Definition of clamor

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : noisy shouting a clamor of children at play
b : a loud continuous noise the clamor of the waterfall
2 : insistent public expression (as of support or protest) the current clamor about what is wrong with our schools

clamor

verb (1)
clamored; clamoring\ ˈklam-​riŋ How to pronounce clamoring (audio) , ˈkla-​mər-​iŋ \

Definition of clamor (Entry 2 of 3)

intransitive verb

1 : to make a din (see din entry 1 sense 1) The children clamored around them, singing songs and laughing.
2 : to become loudly insistent clamored for his impeachment clamoring for full independence

transitive verb

1 : to utter or proclaim insistently and noisily cart peddlers clamored their wares— Walter Farley
2 : to influence by means of clamor

clamor

verb (2)
clamored; clamoring; clamors

Definition of clamor (Entry 3 of 3)

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Did You Know?

The clamor on Broadway at midday can be astonishing to a tourist from a midwestern town; if they happen to be digging up the street with jackhammers, the clamor can be even worse. The clamor on the floor of a stock exchange goes on without stopping for seven hours every day. A clamor of protest may sometimes be quieter, but is often just as hard to ignore. A politican who receives a thousand e-mails a day clamoring for his resignation might as well be listening to an angry crowd.

Examples of clamor in a Sentence

Noun

A clamor outside woke them in the night. city streets filled with clamor a public clamor for an arrest in the case There is growing clamor for reform.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Other Republicans, including those in Colorado, Maine and swing states, also would face difficult votes, despite the clamor for gun laws. Zeke Miller And Deb Riechmann, chicagotribune.com, "Trump says he thinks lawmakers will support ‘red flag laws,’ and also seeks to reassure NRA over gun-rights views," 9 Aug. 2019 Other Republicans, including those in Colorado, Maine and swing states, also would face difficult votes, despite the clamor for gun laws. Anchorage Daily News, "Trump says he wants background checks, also reassures NRA," 9 Aug. 2019 Other Republicans, including those in Colorado, Maine and swing states, also would face difficult votes, despite the clamor for gun laws. Deb Riechmann, The Denver Post, "Trump says he wants gun background checks, also reassures NRA," 9 Aug. 2019 Other Republicans, including those in Colorado, Maine and swing states, also would face difficult votes, despite the clamor for some changes to gun laws. CBS News, "Over 200 mayors push Senate leaders to return to Washington to act on gun reform," 8 Aug. 2019 Other Republicans, including those in Colorado, Maine and swing states, also would face difficult votes, despite the clamor for gun laws. Lisa Mascaro And Matthew Daly, Houston Chronicle, "McConnell says Senate will consider gun background checks," 8 Aug. 2019 The crowd did not want to hear him, see him, and the clamor got louder. Ed Stockly, latimes.com, "Letters to Calendar: Writers on the storm in Santa Monica," 27 Apr. 2018 In Texas, for example, there was a clamor for reforms following the jailhouse death of Sandra Bland, who had been arrested for allegedly assaulting an officer during a July 2015 traffic stop for not using a turn signal. Collette Richards, CNN, "States are trying to change a system that keeps poor people in jail. The bail industry is blocking them.," 30 Aug. 2019 In Texas, for example, there was a clamor for reforms following the jailhouse death of Sandra Bland, who had been arrested for allegedly assaulting an officer during a July 2015 traffic stop for not using a turn signal. Cnn.com Wire Service, The Mercury News, "States are trying to change a system that keeps poor people in jail. The bail industry is blocking them.," 30 Aug. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

In other words, this service isn’t coming about because anyone was clamoring for a new dating site. Caille Millner, SFChronicle.com, "Facebook’s dating app isn’t the friendly nudge into love it should be," 13 Sep. 2019 This offseason has seen fewer analysts clamoring to climb on the 49ers’ bandwagon, but one prominent pundit just hopped on. Michael Nowels, The Mercury News, "Jimmy G will lead 49ers to playoffs, NBC’s Peter King says," 2 Sep. 2019 To be sure, customers weren’t the only ones clamoring for Slack to go public. Fortune, "Slack Spreads Its Wings: What’s Next for the Newly Public Company," 27 Aug. 2019 Before Texas could even board a plane bound for Austin, fans began clamoring for the team to turn to junior Shane Buechele after a sophomore Ehlinger tossed two critical interceptions in the waning moments of an ill-fated rally. Nick Moyle, ExpressNews.com, "Texas, Ehlinger not dwelling on past as season-opener approaches," 27 Aug. 2019 Along with artists and creators, students and learners of every age will continue to clamor for even more stimulating and thought-provoking experiences, of which there will be an abundance. courant.com, "Hartford’s future: 2020 visions of the city in 2025, in 2030," 22 Aug. 2019 The town’s deep bench of financial talent clamored to help. Sarah Schweitzer, The Atlantic, "The Lunch Ladies of New Canaan," 15 Aug. 2019 The Saudi coalition had long accused the Houthis of using Hudaydah to control aid flows and smuggle weapons, and had clamored to take it. Nabih Bulos, Los Angeles Times, "As top allies scale back in Yemen, Saudi Arabia faces prospect of an unwinnable war," 11 Aug. 2019 After an explosively successful first season back in 2017, viewers immediately started clamoring for a second season. Lisa Respers France, CNN, "Viewers are demanding a third season of 'Big Little Lies'," 22 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'clamor.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of clamor

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Verb (2)

1611, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for clamor

Noun and Verb (1)

Middle English, from Anglo-French clamour, from Latin clamor, from clamare to cry out — more at claim

Verb (2)

origin unknown

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Statistics for clamor

Last Updated

18 Sep 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for clamor

The first known use of clamor was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for clamor

clamor

noun

English Language Learners Definition of clamor

: a loud continuous noise (such as the noise made when many people are talking or shouting)
: a loud or strong demand for something by many people

clamor

noun
clam·​or | \ ˈkla-mər How to pronounce clamor (audio) \

Kids Definition of clamor

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a noisy shouting
2 : a loud continuous noise the clamor of a storm
3 : strong and loud demand There was a public clamor for change.

clamor

verb
clamored; clamoring

Kids Definition of clamor (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make a loud noise or demand Fans clamored for the star's autograph.

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More from Merriam-Webster on clamor

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with clamor

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for clamor

Spanish Central: Translation of clamor

Nglish: Translation of clamor for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of clamor for Arabic Speakers

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