stipulate

verb
stip·​u·​late | \ ˈsti-pyə-ˌlāt How to pronounce stipulate (audio) \
stipulated; stipulating

Definition of stipulate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to make an agreement or covenant to do or forbear something : contract
2 : to demand an express term in an agreement used with for

transitive verb

1 : to specify as a condition or requirement (as of an agreement or offer)
2 : to give a guarantee of

stipulate

adjective
stip·​u·​late | \ ˈsti-pyə-lət How to pronounce stipulate (audio) \

Definition of stipulate (Entry 2 of 2)

: having stipules

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Other Words from stipulate

Verb

stipulator \ ˈsti-​pyə-​ˌlā-​tər How to pronounce stipulator (audio) \ noun

Did You Know?

Verb

Like many terms used in the legal profession, "stipulate" has its roots in Latin. It derives from "stipulatus," the past participle of "stipulari," a verb meaning "to demand a guarantee (as from a prospective debtor)." "Stipulate" has been a part of the English language since the 17th century. In Roman law, oral contracts were deemed valid only if they followed a proper question-and-answer format; "stipulate" was sometimes used specifically of this process of contract making, though it also could be used more generally for any means of making a contract or agreement. The "specify as a condition or requirement" sense of the word also dates from the 17th century, and it is the sense that is most often encountered in current use.

Examples of stipulate in a Sentence

Verb

The cease-fire was stipulated by the treaty. The rules stipulate that players must wear uniforms.

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Sculley stipulated that Meyer and the Dignowity Hill Neighborhood Association must agree on the development’s design. Joshua Fechter, ExpressNews.com, "Hays Street Bridge land swap headed to City Council," 12 June 2019 When Buffett and the Gateses founded the pledge in 2010 to encourage the world's wealthiest people to give at least half of their riches to charity, it was stipulated that signers could do so while alive and/or in their wills. Michelle Ruiz, Vogue, "Mackenzie Bezos Signs a Pledge to Give Half Her Fortune to Charity—Your Move, Jeff," 28 May 2019 The bill stipulates that anyone over 18 is still subject to felony child pornography charges. Lucy Diavolo, Teen Vogue, "Washington State Lawmakers Are Advancing a Bill Decriminalizing Teen Sexting," 7 Mar. 2019 The Price-Anderson Act in the US stipulates the limit in the damage. John Timmer, Ars Technica, "An insider’s perspective on Fukushima and everything that came after," 5 Oct. 2018 However the accord stipulates that the parties must give one year’s notice before a withdrawal takes effect. Laurence Norman, WSJ, "U.N. Court Orders U.S. to Lift Iran Sanctions on Humanitarian Goods," 3 Oct. 2018 This week’s change stipulates that large-capacity magazines as well as assault weapons are not allowed in the village. Steve Sadin, chicagotribune.com, "Amid legal battle, Deerfield amends assault weapons ban to add high-capacity magazines," 20 June 2018 The agreement stipulates: $1,400 paid out from the town per job up to 1,500 jobs, for a total of $2.1 million. Lily Altavena, azcentral, "Gilbert to pay as much as $3M for 2,500 jobs with Deloitte," 8 June 2018 Try to look past the frayed fabric on the chairs: His estate stipulates that pieces can never be replaced. Erin Florio, Condé Nast Traveler, "Why Helsinki Should Be Your Next City Break in Europe," 2 Sep. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stipulate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stipulate

Verb

circa 1624, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Adjective

circa 1776, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for stipulate

Verb

Latin stipulatus, past participle of stipulari to demand a guarantee (from a prospective debtor)

Adjective

New Latin stipula

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Statistics for stipulate

Last Updated

16 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for stipulate

The first known use of stipulate was circa 1624

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More Definitions for stipulate

stipulate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stipulate

: to demand or require (something) as part of an agreement

stipulate

verb
stip·​u·​late | \ ˈsti-pyə-ˌlāt How to pronounce stipulate (audio) \
stipulated; stipulating

Legal Definition of stipulate

intransitive verb

1 : to make an agreement or covenant about something (as damages)
2 : to demand a particular promise in an agreement used with for may…assume or stipulate for obligations of all kindsLouisiana Civil Code
3 : to agree respecting an aspect of legal proceedings used with to stipulated to a dismissal of the claim with prejudiceNational Law Journal pleaded guilty to the charge of battery and stipulated to the underlying factsLuna v. Meinke, 844 F. Supp. 1284 (1994)

transitive verb

1 : to specify especially as a condition or requirement of an agreement parties may not stipulate the invalidity of statutes or ordinancesWest v. Bank of Commerce & Trusts, 167 F.2d 664 (1948) the contract stipulated that the lessor was responsible for maintenance within a stipulated period of time
2 : to establish (procedure or evidence) by agreement during a proceeding defendant stipulated that evidence was sufficient to support his conspiracy convictionNational Law Journal based on stipulated facts

History and Etymology for stipulate

Latin stipulatus, past participle of stipulari to exact (as from a prospective debtor) a formal guarantee when making an oral contract

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More from Merriam-Webster on stipulate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with stipulate

Spanish Central: Translation of stipulate

Nglish: Translation of stipulate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of stipulate for Arabic Speakers

Comments on stipulate

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