stipulate

verb
stip·​u·​late | \ˈsti-pyə-ˌlāt \
stipulated; stipulating

Definition of stipulate 

(Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to make an agreement or covenant to do or forbear something : contract

2 : to demand an express term in an agreement used with for

transitive verb

1 : to specify as a condition or requirement (as of an agreement or offer)

2 : to give a guarantee of

stipulate

adjective
stip·​u·​late | \ˈsti-pyə-lət \

Definition of stipulate (Entry 2 of 2)

: having stipules

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Other Words from stipulate

Verb

stipulator \ ˈsti-​pyə-​ˌlā-​tər \ noun

Did You Know?

Verb

Like many terms used in the legal profession, "stipulate" has its roots in Latin. It derives from "stipulatus," the past participle of "stipulari," a verb meaning "to demand a guarantee (as from a prospective debtor)." "Stipulate" has been a part of the English language since the 17th century. In Roman law, oral contracts were deemed valid only if they followed a proper question-and-answer format; "stipulate" was sometimes used specifically of this process of contract making, though it also could be used more generally for any means of making a contract or agreement. The "specify as a condition or requirement" sense of the word also dates from the 17th century, and it is the sense that is most often encountered in current use.

Examples of stipulate in a Sentence

Verb

The cease-fire was stipulated by the treaty. The rules stipulate that players must wear uniforms.

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

One rule that was particularly pertinent this year stipulated that bars must be open at the time of the ceremony to be considered—a feat that this year’s overall winner, Dandelyan, only just managed. Mark Ellwood, Condé Nast Traveler, "This Is Officially the Best Bar in the World," 4 Oct. 2018 The new electoral code stipulated that parties could not send female candidates exclusively to losing districts. Magda Hinojosa, Washington Post, "Women won big in Mexico’s elections — taking nearly half the legislature’s seats. Here’s why.," 11 July 2018 Initial terms stipulated the rebels relinquish their heavy weapons. Nabih Bulos, latimes.com, "More than 160,000 displaced as violence in southern Syria continues," 30 June 2018 Regular legislative review: The Digital Millennium Copyright Act stipulated that the Library of Congress revisit the law’s exceptions every two years, to account for changing technologies and emergent needs. Tarleton Gillespie, WIRED, "How Social Networks Set the Limits of What We Can Say Online," 26 June 2018 In 2007, regulations stipulated that all new towers over 30 meters, or nearly 100 feet, should have sprinklers, but the rules did not apply to older buildings like Grenfell Tower, built in the 1970s. New York Times, "A Year on, Pain and Anger Still Linger Over Grenfell," 13 June 2018 However, the Trump administration stipulated Canada had to agree to the sunset clause. Paul Vieira, WSJ, "Trump, Trudeau Claim Progress on Nafta," 8 June 2018 His public defender, Claud Chong, stipulated to Mimms’ competency Wednesday. David Owens, courant.com, "Man With 130 Arrests Charged in Home Invasion Found Competent," 30 May 2018 The proposal stipulated a local match of roughly $600,000 from the RTA's capital project reserves. Beau Evans, NOLA.com, "Algiers ferry terminal upgrade coming; RTA wins $2.4 million federal grant," 9 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stipulate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stipulate

Verb

circa 1624, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Adjective

circa 1776, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for stipulate

Verb

Latin stipulatus, past participle of stipulari to demand a guarantee (from a prospective debtor)

Adjective

New Latin stipula

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Statistics for stipulate

Last Updated

17 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for stipulate

The first known use of stipulate was circa 1624

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More Definitions for stipulate

stipulate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stipulate

: to demand or require (something) as part of an agreement

stipulate

verb
stip·​u·​late | \ˈsti-pyə-ˌlāt \
stipulated; stipulating

Legal Definition of stipulate 

intransitive verb

1 : to make an agreement or covenant about something (as damages)

2 : to demand a particular promise in an agreement used with for may…assume or stipulate for obligations of all kindsLouisiana Civil Code

3 : to agree respecting an aspect of legal proceedings used with to stipulated to a dismissal of the claim with prejudiceNational Law Journal pleaded guilty to the charge of battery and stipulated to the underlying factsLuna v. Meinke, 844 F. Supp. 1284 (1994)

transitive verb

1 : to specify especially as a condition or requirement of an agreement parties may not stipulate the invalidity of statutes or ordinancesWest v. Bank of Commerce & Trusts, 167 F.2d 664 (1948) the contract stipulated that the lessor was responsible for maintenance within a stipulated period of time

2 : to establish (procedure or evidence) by agreement during a proceeding defendant stipulated that evidence was sufficient to support his conspiracy convictionNational Law Journal based on stipulated facts

History and Etymology for stipulate

Latin stipulatus, past participle of stipulari to exact (as from a prospective debtor) a formal guarantee when making an oral contract

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