blare

verb
\ ˈbler How to pronounce blare (audio) \
blared; blaring

Definition of blare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to sound loud and strident radios blaring

transitive verb

1 : to sound or utter raucously sat blaring the car horn
2 : to proclaim flamboyantly headlines blared his defeat

blare

noun

Definition of blare (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a loud strident noise
2 : dazzling often garish brilliance

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Examples of blare in a Sentence

Verb Rock music blared through the store from the loudspeakers. Loudspeakers blared rock music through the store. Noun the blare of electric guitars the blare of horns arising from the long line of cars behind him did nothing to help the motorist get his car started again
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In satellite images of East Asia at night, lights blare almost everywhere, except in one inky patch between the Yellow Sea and the Sea of Japan, and between the thirty-eighth and the forty-third parallels: North Korea. Robert Hackett, Fortune, "Mars helicopter: NASA’s little engine that could," 20 Apr. 2021 Soundtracks would blare as players carved violently through courses emblazoned with prominent branding. Lewis Gordon, Wired, "Let Lonely Mountains: Downhill Take Your Breath Away," 19 Apr. 2021 In satellite images of East Asia at night, lights blare almost everywhere, except in one inky patch between the Yellow Sea and the Sea of Japan, and between the thirty-eighth and the forty-third parallels: North Korea. Ed Caesar, The New Yorker, "The Incredible Rise of North Korea’s Hacking Army," 19 Apr. 2021 Michael Jackson's songs still blare from radios around the world. Brandon Griggs, CNN, "'Allen v. Farrow' is the latest example of 'consequences culture'," 22 Feb. 2021 Alarms blare in the background along with cries of people in distress. The Salt Lake Tribune, "Police: Explosion in Nashville believed to be ‘intentional’," 25 Dec. 2020 Democrats have watched with alarm as Trump supporters have organized huge caravans that crawl across the streets of Miami-Dade on weekend afternoons, featuring trucks that blare popular Cuban music and fly Trump, Cuban and American flags. Patricia Mazzei, New York Times, "In Miami-Dade County, Younger Cuban Voters Offer Opening for Trump," 25 Oct. 2020 Alarms blare in the background along with cries of people in distress. The Salt Lake Tribune, "Police: Explosion in Nashville believed to be ‘intentional’," 25 Dec. 2020 Alarms blare in the background along with cries of people in distress. The Salt Lake Tribune, "Police: Explosion in Nashville believed to be ‘intentional’," 25 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The blare of horns competed with AC/DC and Lee Greenwood. Washington Post, "The president is sick but his followers feel great," 4 Oct. 2020 When tsunami warning sirens blare in Whittier, residents know to move swiftly away from the coast and head to higher ground. Victoria Petersen, Wired, "Climate Change Is Intensifying the Tsunami Threat in Alaska," 21 Nov. 2020 The blare of horns at all hours has disturbed Frankhauser and her three children ever since. Paul Schwartzman, Washington Post, "Torched Trump signs, raised middle fingers: Why D.C. can’t wait for the election to end," 26 Oct. 2020 Air raid sirens blare while players scramble to the stadium, with jets strafing them along the way. Mike Hume, Washington Post, "‘Call of Duty: Warzone’ event delivers a sweaty quest, new ‘Black Ops Cold War’ trailer," 26 Aug. 2020 The blare of sirens compelled him to the water’s edge. Dan Morse, Washington Post, "A teenager was drowning. 911 sent help to the wrong place.," 21 Aug. 2020 The streets are silent, except for the blare of sirens. Kate Sidley, The New Yorker, "Batman Works from Home," 22 May 2020 The two children perked up as the blare of the police sirens drew near. Joshua Gunter, cleveland, "Goldwood Primary school staff in Rocky River treats students to a parade (photos)," 19 Apr. 2020 Brevity was fine, but the primitivist blare and blur of punk were by no means what the Strokes were after. Jon Pareles, New York Times, "On ‘The New Abnormal,’ the Strokes Flip Nostalgia Toward the Future," 13 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'blare.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of blare

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Noun

1796, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for blare

Verb

Middle English bleren; akin to Middle Dutch blēren to shout

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Time Traveler for blare

Time Traveler

The first known use of blare was in the 15th century

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Statistics for blare

Last Updated

27 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Blare.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/blare. Accessed 12 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for blare

blare

verb

English Language Learners Definition of blare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make a loud and usually unpleasant sound

blare

noun

English Language Learners Definition of blare (Entry 2 of 2)

: a loud and usually unpleasant noise

blare

verb
\ ˈbler How to pronounce blare (audio) \
blared; blaring

Kids Definition of blare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to sound loud and harsh I heard the sirens blare.
2 : to present in a harsh noisy manner Loudspeakers blared advertisements.

blare

noun

Kids Definition of blare (Entry 2 of 2)

: a harsh loud noise

More from Merriam-Webster on blare

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for blare

Nglish: Translation of blare for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of blare for Arabic Speakers

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