anger

noun
an·ger | \ ˈaŋ-gər \

Definition of anger 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a strong feeling of displeasure and usually of antagonism (see antagonism sense 1b) You could hear the anger in his voice. She found it hard to control her anger.

anger

verb
angered; angering\-g(ə-)riŋ \

Definition of anger (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to make (someone) angry He was angered by the decision.

intransitive verb

: to become angry a man who angers easily

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Other words from anger

Noun

angerless \-ləs \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for anger

Noun

anger, ire, rage, fury, indignation, wrath mean an intense emotional state induced by displeasure. anger, the most general term, names the reaction but by itself does not convey cause or intensity. tried to hide his anger ire, more frequent in literary contexts, suggests an intense anger, often with an evident display of feeling. cheeks flushed with ire rage and fury suggest loss of self-control from violence of emotion. shook with rage could not contain his fury indignation stresses righteous anger at what one considers unfair, mean, or shameful. a comment that caused general indignation wrath is likely to suggest a desire or intent to punish or get revenge. I feared her wrath if I was discovered

Noun

anger, rage, and fury mean the feelings brought about by great displeasure. anger can be used of either a strong or a mild feeling. I was able to hide my anger. rage is used of strong violent feeling that is difficult to control. He was screaming with rage. fury is used of overwhelming rage that may cause a person to become violent. In their fury the people smashed windows.

Examples of anger in a Sentence

Noun

He couldn't hide his anger with us. You could hear the anger in his voice. The group expressed its anger over the company's arrogance. He said that he had no anger towards the person who shot him. He never raised his voice in anger. She was shaking in anger.

Verb

They were shocked and angered by the company's arrogance. He was angered to learn that he had been fired. It angered me that she would say something like that. He's a gentle man who's not easily angered.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Here the words, in Latin, ask God to have mercy, warn of God’s anger, speak of the grief that will attend the Last Judgment: Who can choreograph that? Alastair Macaulay, New York Times, "Review: At BalletX, a New Work Alive With Suspense and Surrealism," 13 July 2018 The piling chaos of the news cycle is a source of fear, anger, and paralyzing despair for many who read, if not directly experience it. Ashwin Rodrigues, Fortune, "Monsanto Executives Were Feeling Pretty Good About Current News Cycle," 12 July 2018 Particularly not a feeling of frustration, or anger, or loss. Laurie Penny, Longreads, "Peterson’s Complaint," 12 July 2018 Collette is fabulous throughout, giving an intense performance of the guilt, grief, anger, and abiding love that come with parenthood. Katherine Fusco, The Atlantic, "Hereditary and the Monstrousness of Creative Moms," 11 July 2018 Problems could include depression, anxiety, anger, and an inability to adjust to normal sleep patterns, said Jacob Hyde, an assistant professor of military psychology at the University of Denver who studies reactions to isolated environments. Washington Post, BostonGlobe.com, "Four boys removed from Thailand cave as divers race to beat the rains," 9 July 2018 And their side effects were severe: anger, full-body rashes, or hallucinations that bugs were crawling from holes in his skin. Lizzie Johnson, SFChronicle.com, "Berkeley boy was ‘Patient X’ in first FDA-approved medicine derived from marijuana," 8 July 2018 In an age of unrepentant anger, here was a good egg. Maria Panaritis, Philly.com, "This Jersey dad called my phone in Conshohocken. He left me thinking that tech is dividing us, and stripping us of empathy, too | Maria Panaritis," 7 July 2018 However, rather than cause anger, Barrios' actions seem to have jokingly amused some Spurs fans - who see it as the 24-year-old understanding the Spurs-Liverpool rivalry. SI.com, "Spurs Fans Applaud Potential Signing Wilmar Barrios Following Jordan Henderson Headbutt," 4 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

For those Americans angered by their government’s cruel treatment of children as young as a few months old, this was a hard-fought victory. Jessi Hempel, WIRED, "Immigration Fight Shows Silicon Valley Must Stop Feigning Neutrality," 8 July 2018 Trump’s potential state visit wasn’t the only reason Britons were angered by May’s trip. Margaret Hartmann, Daily Intelligencer, "Everything You Need to Know About Trump’s Controversial U.K. Visit," 12 July 2018 Strzok already answered 11 hours of questions from committee members during a closed hearing late last month, and he was angered by selective leaks of his testimony by lawmakers. Erin Kelly, USA TODAY, "FBI agent Peter Strzok: My personal opinion of Trump did not affect my work," 12 July 2018 DiSabato says he's angered that Jordan hasn't acknowledged the abuse. Andrew Welsh-huggins, chicagotribune.com, "Ex-wrestlers say U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan knew of alleged abuse by Ohio State team doctor," 3 July 2018 The Mexicans were especially angered by a delay midway through the second half when Neymar, who has drawn more fouls, 23, than any other player in the tournament, had his ankle stepped on by Layun. Kevin Baxter, latimes.com, "Neymar tumbles and Mexico falls yet again in World Cup knockout round," 2 July 2018 Some residents were angered by local news reports contending that Matic had visited grocery stores and paid off debts. James Montague, New York Times, "Leading Serbia at World Cup, Nemanja Matic Has One Foot Rooted at Home," 22 June 2018 They were angered by his decision to line up with separatist parties from Catalonia and the Basque Country to eject Rajoy from office. Esteban Duarte, Bloomberg.com, "Sanchez's Spanish Cabinet Sends Signal on Catalonia, Economy," 5 June 2018 After the Singapore summit, the U.S. and South Korea agreed to suspend military exercises that had angered Pyongyang and that Mr. Trump had described as provocative and expensive. Andrew Jeong, WSJ, "North Korea Submarine Development Signals Increased Nuclear Threat," 6 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'anger.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of anger

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for anger

Noun

Middle English, affliction, anger, from Old Norse angr grief; akin to Old English enge narrow, Latin angere to strangle, Greek anchein

Verb

see anger entry 1

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Phrases Related to anger

more in sorrow than in anger

Statistics for anger

Last Updated

7 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for anger

The first known use of anger was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for anger

anger

verb

English Language Learners Definition of anger

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make (someone) angry

anger

noun

English Language Learners Definition of anger (Entry 2 of 2)

: a strong feeling of being upset or annoyed because of something wrong or bad : the feeling that makes someone want to hurt other people, to shout, etc. : the feeling of being angry

anger

verb
an·ger | \ ˈaŋ-gər \
angered; angering

Kids Definition of anger

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make strongly displeased : make angry

anger

noun

Kids Definition of anger (Entry 2 of 2)

: a strong feeling of displeasure or annoyance and often of active opposition to an insult, injury, or injustice

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Comments on anger

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