anger

noun
an·​ger | \ ˈaŋ-gər How to pronounce anger (audio) \

Definition of anger

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a strong feeling of displeasure and usually of antagonism (see antagonism sense 1b) You could hear the anger in his voice. She found it hard to control her anger.

anger

verb
angered; angering\ ˈaŋ-​g(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce angering (audio) \

Definition of anger (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to make (someone) angry He was angered by the decision.

intransitive verb

: to become angry a man who angers easily

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Other Words from anger

Noun

angerless \ ˈaŋ-​gər-​ləs How to pronounce angerless (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for anger

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for anger

Noun

anger, ire, rage, fury, indignation, wrath mean an intense emotional state induced by displeasure. anger, the most general term, names the reaction but by itself does not convey cause or intensity. tried to hide his anger ire, more frequent in literary contexts, suggests an intense anger, often with an evident display of feeling. cheeks flushed with ire rage and fury suggest loss of self-control from violence of emotion. shook with rage could not contain his fury indignation stresses righteous anger at what one considers unfair, mean, or shameful. a comment that caused general indignation wrath is likely to suggest a desire or intent to punish or get revenge. I feared her wrath if I was discovered

Noun

anger, rage, and fury mean the feelings brought about by great displeasure. anger can be used of either a strong or a mild feeling. I was able to hide my anger. rage is used of strong violent feeling that is difficult to control. He was screaming with rage. fury is used of overwhelming rage that may cause a person to become violent. In their fury the people smashed windows.

Examples of anger in a Sentence

Noun He couldn't hide his anger with us. You could hear the anger in his voice. The group expressed its anger over the company's arrogance. He said that he had no anger towards the person who shot him. He never raised his voice in anger. She was shaking in anger. Verb They were shocked and angered by the company's arrogance. He was angered to learn that he had been fired. It angered me that she would say something like that. He's a gentle man who's not easily angered.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun He was sentenced to three years’ probation, and to anger-management and batterer counseling. Ann Killion, SFChronicle.com, "Super Bowl doesn’t hide how 49ers, Chiefs differ on a disturbing NFL issue," 29 Jan. 2020 He was convicted of menacing on Jan. 9, 2018, and placed on two years of probation, ordered to undergo mental health and anger management evaluations and not possess any weapons. oregonlive, "Accused stabbing suspect walked up to off-duty fire lieutenant in bar, made threatening remarks at table, affidavit says," 22 Jan. 2020 Authorities have faced intense pressure to bring charges in the case ahead of the first anniversary on Saturday of the tragedy, which has sparked anger in Brazil and sent shock waves through the global mining industry. Samantha Pearson, WSJ, "Brazil Prosecutors Charge Ex-Vale CEO Fabio Schvartsman With Homicide for Dam Collapse," 22 Jan. 2020 She was also ordered to get a GED, go to anger management classes and submit to drug testing. Cameron Knight, Cincinnati.com, "Woman arrested in connection with Avondale killing," 18 Jan. 2020 The shootdown and the lack of transparency around it has reignited anger in Iran at the country's leadership. Nasser Karimi, Anchorage Daily News, "Iran announces arrests over downing of Ukrainian jet that killed 176," 14 Jan. 2020 Instead of confronting the interviewer out of anger, as anticipated, participants facing the interviewer in reality instead tried to appease him by smiling. Vanessa K. Bohns, The Conversation, "Weinstein jurors must differentiate between consent and compliance – which research shows isn’t easy," 10 Jan. 2020 Life is too short for pent up anger, grudges, extra stress of pain. Kayleigh Roberts, Marie Claire, "Meghan Markle's BFF's Resolution Is "Letting Go of Anger and Grudges" in 2020," 5 Jan. 2020 Sharp angles on facial features indicates negative emotions such as anger, fear, or frustration, while softer lines are more often associated with positive feelings, like happiness or surprise. Mary Widdicks, Quartz, "The visual language of comic books can improve brain function," 2 Jan. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Senate Republicans were angered by Nadler’s criticism. Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner, "Schiff launches impeachment prosecution of 'president’s corrupt scheme'," 22 Jan. 2020 Even there, though, analysts say unrest will continue; the socioeconomic situation is unlikely to change enough to satisfy protesters in the short term, while fierce repression by security forces has angered the public further. Ciara Nugent, Time, "From Chile to Hong Kong, the World Saw a Lot of Protests in 2019. Here's Why That Trend Is Going to Continue," 16 Jan. 2020 The Eisenhower administration was angered by Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser’s espousal of Cold War neutrality and his rather unsubtle efforts to play the Soviet and Western blocs off against each other. Conrad Black, National Review, "Soleimani Killing: A Change for the Better?," 15 Jan. 2020 Many local residents are angered by lack of access to clean water or health care. The Economist, "SMB Winning pays $15bn for rights to Guinea’s iron mountain," 7 Dec. 2019 Fitzgerald, who is now running for Congress, was angered in July when Pfaff criticized GOP lawmakers for not making available $100,000 for mental health services for struggling farmers that was included in the state budget. Molly Beck, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Tony Evers blasts GOP firing of ag secretary as 'political BS'," 5 Nov. 2019 At the time, farmers were angered by the changes, History reports. Jennifer Leman, Popular Mechanics, "What Is Daylight Saving Time?," 7 Oct. 2019 Richardson’s attorneys were angered by this characterization of events and said her reaction was normal for a teenager who did not plan to become pregnant. Keith Bierygolick, Cincinnati.com, "Skylar Richardson: What you need to know as trial starts for former cheerleader charged in buried baby case," 2 Sep. 2019 But perhaps no snub has angered Twitter more than Jennifer Lopez in Hustlers. Kathryn Lindsay, refinery29.com, "If The Academy Won’t Recognise The Brilliance Of J. Lo In Hustlers, The Internet Will," 14 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'anger.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of anger

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for anger

Noun

Middle English anger, angre "distress, affliction, hostile attitude, strong displeasure," borrowed from Old Norse angr "grief, vexation," going back to Germanic *angaza-, from an Indo-European s-stem *h2emǵh-es-/*h2emǵh-os- (whence Latin angor "suffocation, anguish," Sanskrit áṁhaḥ "anxiety, trouble," Avestan ązah-), derivatives of a verbal base *h2emǵh- "constrict, narrow," whence Latin angō, angere "to choke, cause pain to, afflict, vex," Greek ánchō, ánchein "to squeeze, strangle," Hittite ḫamanki "(s/he) ties, binds"; also from the base *h2emǵh- an adjective derivative *h2emǵh-u- "narrow," whence Germanic *angu- (> *angwu-, angwja-, whence Old English enge "narrow," ange "distressing," Old Saxon & Old High German engi "narrow," Old High German ango "anxious," Old Norse ǫngr, øngr, Gothic aggwus), Old Irish cumung "narrow," Welsh cyfyng, Old Church Slavic ǫzŭkŭ, Polish wązki, Armenian anjuk (Slavic & Armenian with a velar suffix), Sanskrit aṁhúḥ

Note: For other words formed from this Indo-European base see etymologies of angst, anguish entry 1, anxious, hangnail, quinsy.

Verb

Middle English angren "to be anxious, grieve, be vexed, irritate, afflict," probably in part derivative of anger, angre anger entry 1, in part borrowed from Old Norse angra "to grieve, vex," derivative of angr "grief, vexation"

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Learn More about anger

Time Traveler for anger

Time Traveler

The first known use of anger was in the 13th century

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Statistics for anger

Last Updated

9 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Anger.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/anger?pronunciation&lang=en_us&dir=a&file=anger02w. Accessed 23 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for anger

anger

noun
How to pronounce anger (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of anger

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a strong feeling of being upset or annoyed because of something wrong or bad : the feeling that makes someone want to hurt other people, to shout, etc. : the feeling of being angry

anger

verb

English Language Learners Definition of anger (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (someone) angry

anger

verb
an·​ger | \ ˈaŋ-gər How to pronounce anger (audio) \
angered; angering

Kids Definition of anger

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make strongly displeased : make angry

anger

noun

Kids Definition of anger (Entry 2 of 2)

: a strong feeling of displeasure or annoyance and often of active opposition to an insult, injury, or injustice

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More from Merriam-Webster on anger

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for anger

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with anger

Spanish Central: Translation of anger

Nglish: Translation of anger for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of anger for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about anger

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