affection

noun
af·​fec·​tion | \ ə-ˈfek-shən \

Definition of affection

1 : a feeling of liking and caring for someone or something : tender attachment : fondness She had a deep affection for her parents.
2 : a moderate feeling or emotion
3a(1) : a bodily condition
(2) : disease, malady a pulmonary affection
b : attribute shape and weight are affections of bodies
4 obsolete : partiality, prejudice
5 : the feeling aspect (as in pleasure) of consciousness
7 : the action of affecting : the state of being affected
8 : umlaut sense 2 used especially in the grammar of the Celtic languages

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Other Words from affection

affectionless \ -​ləs \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for affection

feeling, emotion, affection, sentiment, passion mean a subjective response to a person, thing, or situation. feeling denotes any partly mental, partly physical response marked by pleasure, pain, attraction, or repulsion; it may suggest the mere existence of a response but imply nothing about the nature or intensity of it. the feelings that once moved me are gone emotion carries a strong implication of excitement or agitation but, like feeling, encompasses both positive and negative responses. the drama portrays the emotions of adolescence affection applies to feelings that are also inclinations or likings. a memoir of childhood filled with affection for her family sentiment often implies an emotion inspired by an idea. her feminist sentiments are well known passion suggests a very powerful or controlling emotion. revenge became his ruling passion

Affectation and Affection

Affectation looks a lot like a much more common word, affection. But the two are used very differently.

The more familiar word, affection, in modern use means "a feeling of liking and caring for someone or something," as in "They show their dog a lot of affection."

Affectation, on the other hand, refers to a form of behavior that's unnatural to the person engaging in it, and that is meant to impress other people. A phony accent someone uses to sound more sophisticated, for example, can be considered an affectation, as can pretending to know all about some obscure band in order to seem cool.

The words don't have much in common in their use, but their similarity in appearance is not coincidence. Both have to do with one of the trickiest words in the language: affect.

Affect is one of the most frequently looked-up words in the dictionary, primarily because of its regular confusion with effect. The short rationale that you often hear when it comes to distinguishing the two is that effect is usually a noun and affect is a verb. The breakdown isn't all that simple, however, and what makes things even more confusing is that there are two verb entries for affect.

One affect entry is for the sense meaning "to produce an effect upon (someone)" or "to act upon (a person, a person's mind or feelings, etc.) so as to effect a response." This is the sense that connects to affection, as in "We were affected by the young woman's heartfelt speech." Being affected by something in this way doesn't necessarily result in affection, but it can.

The other verb affect is defined as "to make a display of liking or using : cultivate" or "to put a pretense on : feign." It is used when talking about things like styles or mannerisms, as in "He affected a British accent and tweedy look after reading nothing but Sherlock Holmes stories for months on end."

The two verbs affect took different etymological paths from the same origin. The "put on a pretense" sense of affect derives via Middle English and Anglo-French from the Latin affectāre, meaning "to try to accomplish, strive after, pretend to have." Affectāre is a derivative of afficere, which means "to produce an effect on, exert an influence on"; the affect related to affection is from a variant of afficere.

Examples of affection in a Sentence

She has deep affection for her parents. He shows great affection for his grandchildren. feelings of love and affection He now looks back on those years with great affection. She developed a deep affection for that country and its people.
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Recent Examples on the Web

With a lot of affection from his family, attention in school and the help of doctors and therapists, Jose is thriving in his own ways. Washington Post, "From shrieks in bucket to laughs, Brazil Zika baby improves," 6 June 2018 However, the dating rumors gained momentum after an unofficial confirmation when they were snapped in various stages of affection-even sharing a kiss!-outside of London's Heathrow Airport. Amanda Mitchell, Marie Claire, "Ashley Benson Is Staying Silent About Her Relationship With Cara Delevingne," 24 Aug. 2018 Physical affection, for example, was far more demonstrative between female friends than it is today (in America, at least), as were passionate and open declarations of devotion. Sara Petersen, Vox, "Why do we stop giving meaningful gifts to our friends?," 3 Dec. 2018 But all of this affection comes after an intense start for the two friends. Alison Caporimo, Seventeen, ""Riverdale"'s Camila Mendes and Charles Melton Just Made Their Relationship Instagram Official!," 8 Oct. 2018 Amorous and with a heart of gold, your lover can expect to be showered with tons of affection and extravagant gifts. Ashley Otero, Teen Vogue, "Who You Should Date, Based on Your Horoscope," 20 Aug. 2018 Never shy to show off their affection, the couple was spotted cuddling on a blanket in the grass. Isabel Greenberg, Harper's BAZAAR, "Justin Bieber and Hailey Baldwin Packed On The PDA (Again) In Brooklyn," 31 July 2018 After years of being nearly allergic to commitment and public displays of affection, Samantha’s finally settled down with her boy toy. Hannah Giorgis, The Atlantic, "Long Live Samantha Jones," 6 June 2018 This kiss—a symbol of affection, empathy and liberty—felt so poignant that the local government never took it down. Gemma Askham, Condé Nast Traveler, "20 Best Things to Do in Barcelona," 3 Mar. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'affection.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of affection

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for affection

Middle English affeccioun "capacity for feeling, emotion, desire, love," borrowed from Anglo-French, "desire, love, inclination, partiality," borrowed from Latin affectiōn-, affectiō "frame of mind, feeling, feeling of attachment," from affec- (variant stem of afficere "to produce an effect on, exert an influence on") + -tiōn-, -tiō, suffix of action nouns — more at affect entry 3

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Statistics for affection

Last Updated

11 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for affection

The first known use of affection was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for affection

affection

noun
af·​fec·​tion | \ ə-ˈfek-shən \

Kids Definition of affection

: a feeling of liking and caring for someone or something He shows great affection for his grandchildren.

affection

noun
af·​fec·​tion | \ ə-ˈfek-shən \

Medical Definition of affection

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a moderate feeling or emotion
2 : the feeling aspect (as in pleasure or displeasure) of consciousness

affection

noun

Medical Definition of affection (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the action of affecting : the state of being affected
2a : a bodily condition
b : disease, malady a pulmonary affection

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Comments on affection

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