emotion

noun
emo·​tion | \i-ˈmō-shən \

Definition of emotion 

1a obsolete : disturbance

b : excitement

2a : the affective aspect of consciousness : feeling

b : a state of feeling

c : a conscious mental reaction (such as anger or fear) subjectively experienced as strong feeling usually directed toward a specific object and typically accompanied by physiological and behavioral changes in the body

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Synonyms for emotion

Synonyms

chord, feeling, passion, sentiment

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Choose the Right Synonym for emotion

feeling, emotion, affection, sentiment, passion mean a subjective response to a person, thing, or situation. feeling denotes any partly mental, partly physical response marked by pleasure, pain, attraction, or repulsion; it may suggest the mere existence of a response but imply nothing about the nature or intensity of it. the feelings that once moved me are gone emotion carries a strong implication of excitement or agitation but, like feeling, encompasses both positive and negative responses. the drama portrays the emotions of adolescence affection applies to feelings that are also inclinations or likings. a memoir of childhood filled with affection for her family sentiment often implies an emotion inspired by an idea. her feminist sentiments are well known passion suggests a very powerful or controlling emotion. revenge became his ruling passion

Examples of emotion in a Sentence

a display of raw emotion The defendant showed no emotion when the verdict was read. She was overcome with emotion at the news of her friend's death.
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Recent Examples on the Web

In other words, super-fans are super emotionally invested in the world of Westeros, and experience genuine real-world emotions in response to the fictional events. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "New study gives some handy tips on how to survive on Game of Thrones," 9 Dec. 2018 As the harsh winter rolls on and positive emotions decline, researchers expected that passive coping mechanisms, like denial or depression, would sink in. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "To Survive Antarctica, Scientists Enter a Kind of 'Psychological Hibernation'," 5 Dec. 2018 What’s interesting to me about the backlash is how much of it seems based on pent-up emotions. Eric Johnson, Recode, "Why Amazon is a ‘bully,’ and Facebook and Google are ‘the enemies of independent thought’," 3 Dec. 2018 The study determined that the lasting effects of domestication on these animals may have given them the ability to not only discriminate between emotions on non-goat faces, but also to prefer happy faces. Cady Drell, Marie Claire, "Goats Are the Only Men Allowed to Tell Me to Smile," 30 Nov. 2018 Something felt unbalanced, as if a stealth assault had been made on the limbic system, the lacy cortical network that forms the architecture of our primal needs and emotions: pleasure, anger, fear. Guy Trebay, Condé Nast Traveler, "In the Heart of Navajo Lands," 19 Oct. 2018 Except of course for that outlay of cash — not to mention time and emotion. Horacio Salinas, Allure, "The Rise of Egg Freezing as a Fertility Choice," 15 Oct. 2018 Perhaps the horror show could tackle the utterly terrifying emotion known as love. Ella Cerón, Teen Vogue, "Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Broke Kiernan Shipka's Heart — and She's OK With That," 12 Nov. 2018 Joining together with others to address the issue not only enables people to enhance their impact, but also provides social support that can help with the negative emotions. Patricia Garcia, Vogue, "If Climate Change Is Causing You Anxiety or Even Grief, Experts Say You are Not Alone," 19 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'emotion.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of emotion

1579, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for emotion

Middle French, from emouvoir to stir up, from Old French esmovoir, from Latin emovēre to remove, displace, from e- + movēre to move

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Statistics for emotion

Last Updated

17 Dec 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for emotion

The first known use of emotion was in 1579

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More Definitions for emotion

emotion

noun

English Language Learners Definition of emotion

: a strong feeling (such as love, anger, joy, hate, or fear)

emotion

noun
emo·​tion | \i-ˈmō-shən \

Kids Definition of emotion

: strong feeling (as anger, love, joy, or fear) often accompanied by a physical reaction She flushed with emotion.

emotion

noun
emo·​tion | \i-ˈmō-shən \

Medical Definition of emotion 

1 : the affective aspect of consciousness

2 : a state of feeling

3 : a conscious mental reaction (as anger or fear) subjectively experienced as strong feeling usually directed toward a specific object and typically accompanied by physiological and behavioral changes in the body — compare affect

Other Words from emotion

emotional \-​shnəl, -​shən-​ᵊl \ adjective
emotionality \-​ˌmō-​shə-​ˈnal-​ət-​ē \ noun, plural emotionalities
emotionally \-​ˈmō-​shnə-​lē, -​shən-​ᵊl-​ē \ adverb

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