admit

verb
ad·​mit | \ əd-ˈmit How to pronounce admit (audio) , ad- \
admitted; admitting

Definition of admit

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to allow scope for : permit admits no possibility of misunderstanding
b : to concede as true or valid admitted making a mistake
2a : to allow entry (as to a place, fellowship, or privilege) an open window had admitted rain admitted to the club
b : to accept into a hospital as an inpatient he was admitted last night for chest pains

intransitive verb

1 : to give entrance or access
2a : allow, permit admits of two interpretations
b : to make acknowledgment used with to admitted to having doubts

admit

noun

Definition of admit (Entry 2 of 2)

US
: a person who is admitted into a school, hospital, etc. When a patient is transferred, the nurse will take the next new admit—unless her patient is transferred to a hospital for only a temporary stay.— Sally Seaver

Synonyms & Antonyms for admit

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Choose the Right Synonym for admit

Verb

acknowledge, admit, own, avow, confess mean to disclose against one's will or inclination. acknowledge implies the disclosing of something that has been or might be concealed. acknowledged an earlier peccadillo admit implies reluctance to disclose, grant, or concede and refers usually to facts rather than their implications. admitted the project was over budget own implies acknowledging something in close relation to oneself. must own I know little about computers avow implies boldly declaring, often in the face of hostility, what one might be expected to be silent about. avowed that he was a revolutionary confess may apply to an admission of a weakness, failure, omission, or guilt. confessed a weakness for sweets

Examples of admit in a Sentence

Verb You know you're wrong! Admit it! I hate to admit it, but he's right. This ticket admits one person. He admitted them into his office. They refused to admit her to the club. The patient was very sick when she was admitted to the hospital. He was admitted last night for chest pains. The judge decided to admit the evidence.
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Whether anyone will admit it or not, the chase is already on. Christian Holub, EW.com, 18 Nov. 2021 And even the coach had to admit that things aren't getting better. Andy Vasquez, USA TODAY, 15 Nov. 2021 Even those of us who cringe at the idea of matching Christmas sweaters or T-shirts have to admit: There is something undeniably charming about wearing matching family pajamas on Christmas. Sabrina Rojas Weiss, PEOPLE.com, 4 Nov. 2021 Even Dingell had to admit she'd been outdone — at least for the moment. Todd Spangler, Detroit Free Press, 29 Oct. 2021 But after a cha-cha and fox trot fusion, even Goodman had to admit that Shumpert brought down the house. Washington Post, 7 Oct. 2021 If your aging loved one is declining and doesn’t realize it or won’t admit it, be respectful. Carolyn Rosenblatt, Forbes, 15 Nov. 2021 Superstitions – there are plenty of them and whether people admit it or not, believing in something that could bring good or bad luck isn’t uncommon. Leada Gore | Lgore@al.com, al, 29 Oct. 2021 And in fact, the Eternals’ minds are at constant risk of cracking under the pressure of all that history and — will no one admit it? K. Austin Collins, Rolling Stone, 26 Oct. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Even those staffers who prefer the larger Blackwing admit that the smaller Blackwing is a spectacular car in its own right. Tony Quiroga, Car and Driver, 17 Nov. 2021 Among non-LGBTQ people, 45% admit they are confused by all the different terms to describe people in the LGBTQ community. David Oliver, USA TODAY, 4 Nov. 2021 Dogecoin continued its recent surge Wednesday, hitting new all-time highs and making even the most skeptical admit that the vaulted $1 price goal is looking more and more achievable. Chris Morris, Fortune, 5 May 2021 The majority of the cases were identified through routine, asymptomatic testing, including during travel, or before a health procedure or admit. Annie Berman, Anchorage Daily News, 29 Apr. 2021 Last year alone, 16,628 candidates applied to both schools; just 1,520 gained an acceptance, a mere 9.1% admit rate. John Byrne, Forbes, 20 Apr. 2021 More selective schools have undergraduate admit rates below 50%. Douglas Belkin, WSJ, 16 Mar. 2021 The duo admit to sharing a love of rubbing their hands up and down the shaved portions. Rosy Cordero, EW.com, 22 Feb. 2021 And those, like Brantley, who’d as soon endure a week’s worth of sensitivity training as admit to using one of these hyper-trendy ballistic newcomers. Will Brantley, Field & Stream, 21 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'admit.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of admit

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1974, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for admit

Verb

Middle English admitten, borrowed from Anglo-French admitter, admetter, admettre, borrowed from Latin admittere "to allow entrance or approach," from ad- ad- + mittere "to release, let go, discharge, let fly, throw down, send (for a purpose)," perhaps going back to Indo-European *mei̯th2- "alternate, exchange, remove" (assuming sense shift "exchange" > "give, bestow" > "let go, send"), from whence, with varying ablaut grades, Sanskrit méthati "treats hostilely, abuses," mitháḥ "mutually, alternately," míthū "in opposed directions, wrongly," Avestan mōiθat̰ "will deprive," hǝ̄m.aibī.mōist "(s/he) joins," West Germanic *meiþ-a- "conceal, avoid" (presumably "remove" > "remove oneself"), whence Old English mīðan "to conceal, dissemble," Old Saxon miđan, Old High German mīdan "to avoid, shy away from, conceal"

Note: See also forms at etymology of mutable descending from a causative derivative *moi̯th2-. The short vowel and geminate consonant in mittere is usually explained as an instance of the "littera-rule" (or "Iuppiter-rule"), whereby certain pre-Latin diphthongs are resolved as either long vowel + single consonant or short vowel + geminate consonant; in most such cases examples of both alternates are attested, though in this instance no attestation of mīt- is known.

Noun

derivative of admit entry 1

Learn More About admit

Time Traveler for admit

Time Traveler

The first known use of admit was in the 15th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near admit

admissions officer

admit

admit defeat

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for admit

Last Updated

3 Dec 2021

Cite this Entry

“Admit.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/admit. Accessed 6 Dec. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for admit

admit

verb

English Language Learners Definition of admit

: to say usually in an unwilling way that you accept or do not deny the truth or existence of (something)
: to allow (someone) to enter a place
: to allow (someone) to join a club, group, etc.

admit

verb
ad·​mit | \ əd-ˈmit How to pronounce admit (audio) \
admitted; admitting

Kids Definition of admit

1 : to make known usually with some unwillingness Still, it was galling, this having to admit she was afraid.— Natalie Babbitt, Tuck Everlasting
2 : to allow to enter : let in No one under 18 is admitted.
3 : permit entry 1 sense 2, allow This law admits no exceptions.

admit

transitive verb
ad·​mit | \ əd-ˈmit, ad- How to pronounce admit (audio) \
admitted; admitting

Medical Definition of admit

: to accept (someone) into a hospital, clinic, or other treatment facility as an inpatient he was admitted last night for chest pains

admit

verb
ad·​mit
admitted; admitting

Legal Definition of admit

transitive verb

1 : to concede as true or valid : make an admission of
2 : to allow to be entered or offered admitted the document into evidence admit a will to probate

intransitive verb

: to make acknowledgment used with to admits to the murder

More from Merriam-Webster on admit

Nglish: Translation of admit for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of admit for Arabic Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Farm Idioms Quiz

  • cow coming home
  • What does 'poke' refer to in the expression 'pig in a poke'?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!