unite

1 of 2

verb

united; uniting

transitive verb

1
a
: to put together to form a single unit
b
: to cause to adhere
c
: to link by a legal or moral bond
2
: to possess (different things, such as qualities) in combination

intransitive verb

1
a
: to become one or as if one
b
: to become combined by or as if by adhesion or mixture
2
: to act in concert
uniter noun

unite

2 of 2

noun

: an old British gold 20-shilling piece issued first by James I in 1604 for the newly united England and Scotland

called also Jacobus

Choose the Right Synonym for unite

join, combine, unite, connect, link, associate, relate mean to bring or come together into some manner of union.

join implies a bringing into contact or conjunction of any degree of closeness.

joined forces in an effort to win

combine implies some merging or mingling with corresponding loss of identity of each unit.

combined jazz and rock to create a new music

unite implies somewhat greater loss of separate identity.

the colonies united to form a republic

connect suggests a loose or external attachment with little or no loss of identity.

a mutual defense treaty connected the two nations

link may imply strong connection or inseparability of elements still retaining identity.

a name forever linked with liberty

associate stresses the mere fact of frequent occurrence or existence together in space or in logical relation.

opera is popularly associated with high society

relate suggests the existence of a real or presumed logical connection.

related what he observed to what he already knew

Examples of unite in a Sentence

Verb Party members united in support of their candidate. Students united to protest the tuition increase. uniting against a common enemy The struggle to end slavery united rich and poor. A treaty united the independent nations. The sperm and egg unite to form an embryo. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
What are some other examples of what unites your cooking? Stephen Orr, Better Homes & Gardens, 13 Feb. 2024 The New Orleans Food and Wine Experience Voted by USA Today as the 10th Best General Food Festival and 4th Best Wine Festival, The New Orleans Food And Wine Experience is an outstanding way to unite food and wine lovers while giving back to the local community. Ronny Maye, Essence, 12 Feb. 2024 Two of the largest Black church groups in Georgia are formally uniting for the first time to mobilize Black voters in the battleground state ahead of the November presidential election. Maya King, New York Times, 11 Feb. 2024 Initially, No Labels aimed to unite Democrats and Republicans trying to solve some of Congress' most intractable problems. Cristina Corujo, CBS News, 9 Feb. 2024 My goal is to unite people and put forth effective solutions that will enhance the overall quality of life, for ALL residents in Mecklenburg County. Charlotte Observer, 8 Feb. 2024 Cain International was able to secure control of the vacant land and existing hotel property and unite them in the new project designed by Foster. Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times, 8 Feb. 2024 Her appointment was historic, marking the first time an Irish nationalist, who aspires to take Northern Ireland out of the U.K. and unite it with the republic, has held the post. Jill Lawless The Associated Press, arkansasonline.com, 6 Feb. 2024 Can the protest movement unite, not divide, farmers in order to have a true impact? Colette Davidson, The Christian Science Monitor, 2 Feb. 2024
Noun
Twenty-five years after Sidney (Neve Campbell) was targeted in Woodsboro, she, Gale (Courteney Cox), and Dewey (David Arquette) unite with a new cast of characters — including the Carpenter sisters, Sam (Melissa Barrera) and Tara (Ortega) — to unmask the latest Ghostface killer(s). Declan Gallagher, EW.com, 10 May 2023 Oftentimes bronzers and contour products can go hand-in-hand, and in Makeup by Mario’s case, the two unite into a single entity in the SoftScuplting Shaping Stick. Alyssa Brascia, Peoplemag, 12 Nov. 2023 Get The Recipe 06 of 75 Crunchy Peanut Butter-Chocolate Swirl Bars Peanut butter and chocolate unite to create a rich, delectable, and memorable bar. Southern Living Editors, Southern Living, 13 Oct. 2023 Crisp bell pepper and onion unite with creamy avocado. Robin Miller, The Arizona Republic, 27 July 2023 Spicy Old World hops (Herkules and Zeus) and piney Pacific Northwest workhorses (Columbus and Cascade) unite for a satisfying, light-bodied lager. Peter Rowe, San Diego Union-Tribune, 9 June 2023 Here, form and function unite, and everything serves a purpose. Emma Reynolds, Robb Report, 31 May 2023 Some 16 feet high, the doors slide open so completely that inside and outside unite, with the living/dining room becoming a kind of covered porch. wsj.com, 1 May 2023 Ghouls, goblins and witches of San Diego, unite. Roger Sands, Forbes, 4 Oct. 2022 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'unite.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French uniter, from Latin unitus, past participle of unire, from unus one — more at one

Noun

obsolete unite united, from Middle English unit, from Latin unitus, past participle

First Known Use

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1604, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of unite was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near unite

Cite this Entry

“Unite.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/unite. Accessed 26 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

unite

verb
yu̇-ˈnīt
united; uniting
1
a
: to put or come together to form a single unit
b
: to cause to cling together
unite two pieces of wood
c
: to link by a legal or moral bond
2
: to become one or as if one
two elements unite to form a compound
3
: to join in action : act as if one
unite in song
uniter noun
Etymology

Verb

Middle English uniten "to unite," from early French uniter (same meaning), from Latin unitus, past participle of unire "to unite, make into one," from earlier unus "one" — related to inch, ounce, unison

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