unite

verb
\ yu̇-ˈnīt \
united; uniting

Definition of unite

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to put together to form a single unit
b : to cause to adhere
c : to link by a legal or moral bond
2 : to possess (different things, such as qualities) in combination

intransitive verb

1a : to become one or as if one
b : to become combined by or as if by adhesion or mixture
2 : to act in concert

unite

noun
\ ˈyü-ˌnīt \

Definition of unite (Entry 2 of 2)

: an old British gold 20-shilling piece issued first by James I in 1604 for the newly united England and Scotland

called also Jacobus

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Other Words from unite

Verb

uniter noun

Choose the Right Synonym for unite

Verb

join, combine, unite, connect, link, associate, relate mean to bring or come together into some manner of union. join implies a bringing into contact or conjunction of any degree of closeness. joined forces in an effort to win combine implies some merging or mingling with corresponding loss of identity of each unit. combined jazz and rock to create a new music unite implies somewhat greater loss of separate identity. the colonies united to form a republic connect suggests a loose or external attachment with little or no loss of identity. a mutual defense treaty connected the two nations link may imply strong connection or inseparability of elements still retaining identity. a name forever linked with liberty associate stresses the mere fact of frequent occurrence or existence together in space or in logical relation. opera is popularly associated with high society relate suggests the existence of a real or presumed logical connection. related what he observed to what he already knew

Examples of unite in a Sentence

Verb

Party members united in support of their candidate. Students united to protest the tuition increase. uniting against a common enemy The struggle to end slavery united rich and poor. A treaty united the independent nations. The sperm and egg unite to form an embryo.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

In Riverdale’s third season, which premieres on October 10, Reinhart is optimistic that Betty’s two sides will finally unite in a single, nuanced character. Annina Mislin, Glamour, "You Don't Know the Real Lili Reinhart," 12 Sep. 2018 Business leaders are experts at uniting people, regardless of background or belief, around common goals. charlotteobserver, "Ashley Christensen," 3 July 2018 If Democrats stand united in opposition to Trump's choice, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky can lose no more than one vote. Mark Sherman, Houston Chronicle, "Justice Kennedy retiring, giving Trump pivotal court pick," 28 June 2018 The chain known for uniting craft beer and specialty pies -- sriracha shrimp with pineapple and the red grape pizza with Gorgonzola and fresh rosemary -- launches a 145-seat location in August at Clay Terrace in Carmel. Liz Biro, Indianapolis Star, "18 new restaurants in Carmel, Noblesville, Westfield and Indianapolis' north side," 27 June 2018 The renaming faced little backlash, the community was united in their interest to change the name of the school. Jamie Spain, PEOPLE.com, "Virginia School Named for Confederate General Changed to Barack Obama Elementary," 19 June 2018 Gosha Rubchinskiy thinks street fashion is the new wave of uniting youth. Liana Satenstein, Vogue, "Gosha Rubchinskiy on the End of Gosha Rubchinskiy—And More From His Talk in Tbilisi, Georgia," 4 May 2018 By uniting anyway, graduate students have demonstrated that the very consciousness the university seeks to weed out has instead taken root. Sarah Jones, The New Republic, "Columbia’s War On Labor," 1 May 2018 There’s something of a secret password element to this, a shibboleth that not only marks users of a certain age and experience but unites them. Laura Hudson, The Verge, "The latest bizarre Simpsons meme is about downloading songs on Limewire," 19 Oct. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

From David to Erika to 'D' to the gender neutral, elephant-human-hybrid Eureka who perseveres in the face of adversity - all of these persons with their strengths and flaws - unite in me. Megan Friedman, Seventeen, ""Drag Race" Finalist Eureka O’Hara Says It's Time for Big Girls To Rule The World," 25 June 2018 Much more interesting would be seeing superstars team up, or former teammates re-unite. Si.com Staff, SI.com, "Nine Innings: The Yankees' Greatest Need, Unlikely All-Stars and Midsummer Classic Changes," 11 June 2018 Kroger sells off convenience store business for $2.15B Kroger has sold off its convenience store business unite to EG Group for approximately $2.15 billion. Kara Driscoll, ajc, "5 surprising ways Kroger is changing stores in 2018," 30 May 2018 With Rihanna co-chairing the event, expect to see at least some of the cast unite on the Met Gala carpet. Maeve Mcdermott, USA TODAY, "Met Gala 2018: Everything you need to know about fashion's biggest party," 4 May 2018 Maurice Zuberano was second unite supervisor, and Ridgway Callow assistant director. Thr Staff, The Hollywood Reporter, "'The Sound of Music': THR's 1965 Review," 2 Mar. 2018 The @AmericanIdol judges team @LionelRichie, @katyperry and @LukeBryanOnline unite on @GMA. Gil Kaufman, Billboard, "'American Idol' Reboot Judges Katy Perry, Luke Bryan & Lionel Richie Talk 'Dream Team,' Las Vegas Shootings on 'GMA'," 4 Oct. 2017 The graduates in their caps and gowns and the protesters supporting Local 33 UNITE HERE wearing orange T-shirts and carrying orange balloons mostly avoided each other. Kathleen Megan, courant.com, "Yale Honors Stevie Wonder, John Kerry, John Lewis At Commencement," 22 May 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'unite.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of unite

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1604, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for unite

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French uniter, from Latin unitus, past participle of unire, from unus one — more at one

Noun

obsolete unite united, from Middle English unit, from Latin unitus, past participle

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Statistics for unite

Last Updated

12 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for unite

The first known use of unite was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for unite

unite

verb

English Language Learners Definition of unite

: to join together to do or achieve something

: to cause (two or more people or things) to be joined together and become one thing

: to become joined together as one thing

unite

verb
\ yu̇-ˈnīt \
united; uniting

Kids Definition of unite

1 : to put or come together to form a single unit
2 : to bind by legal or moral ties This treaty will unite our nations.
3 : to join in action The two groups united to improve schools.

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More from Merriam-Webster on unite

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with unite

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for unite

Spanish Central: Translation of unite

Nglish: Translation of unite for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of unite for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about unite

Comments on unite

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