trip

verb
\ ˈtrip How to pronounce trip (audio) \
tripped; tripping

Definition of trip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to catch the foot against something so as to stumble
2 : to make a mistake or false step (as in morality or accuracy)
3a : to dance, skip, or caper with light quick steps
b : to walk with light quick steps
4 : to stumble in articulation when speaking
5 : to make a journey
6a : to actuate a mechanism
b : to become operative
7a : to get high on a psychedelic drug (such as LSD) : turn on often used with out
b slang : freak sense 3b

transitive verb

1a : to cause to stumble often used with up
b : to cause to fail : obstruct often used with up
2 : to detect in a misstep, fault, or blunder also : expose usually used with up
3 : to release or operate (a mechanism) especially by releasing a catch or detent trip the fire alarm
4 : to raise (an anchor) from the bottom so as to hang free
5a : to pull (a yard) into a perpendicular position for lowering
b : to hoist (a topmast) far enough to enable the fid to be withdrawn preparatory to housing or lowering
6 archaic : to perform (a dance) lightly or nimbly
trip the light fantastic

trip

noun

Definition of trip (Entry 2 of 2)

b : a single round or tour on a business errand
2a : an intense visionary experience undergone by a person who has taken a psychedelic drug (such as LSD)
b : an exciting or unusual experience the party was a trip
3 : absorption in or obsession with an interest, attitude, or state of mind a guilt trip on a nostalgia trip
4 : a faltering step caused by stumbling
5 : a stroke or catch by which a wrestler is made to lose footing
7 : a quick light step
8a : the action of tripping mechanically
b : a device for tripping a mechanism (such as a catch or detent)

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Examples of trip in a Sentence

Verb He deliberately tried to trip me. The dancers tripped off the stage. Noun They got back from their trip yesterday. a trip around the world He was on an acid trip. an ankle injury caused by a trip
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb From airlines to trip insurance and hotels, the entire system broke down. Washington Post, "What happened to travel in 2020? What will happen in 2021?," 16 Dec. 2020 Many factors can trip up a vaccinemaker, including shortages of raw materials, equipment, or glass vials. Jon Cohen, Science | AAAS, "As COVID-19 vaccines emerge, a global waiting game begins," 15 Dec. 2020 The owner might trip over the dog if the dog is not taught basic manners. John Schandelmeier, Anchorage Daily News, "There are no bad dogs, just untrained or neglected ones," 12 Dec. 2020 There were lots of technical problems at the beginning, which made me get flustered and trip over my words. Dan Ariely, WSJ, "How to Make Holiday Tasks More Manageable," 10 Dec. 2020 The movie’s challenges suggest that the new rules could trip up films dealing with white masculinity. Washington Post, "Most recent best-picture winners would have met new Oscar diversity requirements," 9 Sep. 2020 But several risks remain that could trip up markets in the near term. Arkansas Online, "Worsening pandemic sends stocks lower," 12 Nov. 2020 But several risks remain that could trip up markets in the near term. Stan Choe, USA TODAY, "Dow, S&P 500 fall as spiking coronavirus cases renew worries about the economy," 12 Nov. 2020 But several risks remain that could trip up markets in the near term. Janet Mcconnaughey And Jim Mustian, Star Tribune, "Calls for independent investigation of Black teen's death," 12 Nov. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Below, take a trip to England with us and explore these impressive sites. Mary Elizabeth Andriotis, House Beautiful, "All of the Houses, Palaces, and Castles Featured in Bridgerton," 31 Dec. 2020 Higgins and his family have made the trip back to Pearl Harbor several times over the years. oregonlive, "Oregon man, 99, survived Pearl Harbor, then COVID-19," 30 Dec. 2020 Waddle made the trip to Atlanta for the SEC championship game and played catch on the field beforehand. Mike Rodak | Mrodak@al.com, al, "Jaylen Waddle not back at practice yet for Alabama," 28 Dec. 2020 The Heisman Trophy favorite had tested positive for the coronavirus but still made the trip and stood on the sideline in a mask. New York Times, "Our Altered View of Sports After 2020," 27 Dec. 2020 Chris Burnett, who works in finance, made a trip to Rockefeller Center just to go to Eddie’s. Ben Kesslen, NBC News, "Shoe repair stores used to be a good way to make a living. Then, the pandemic sent corporate workers home.," 26 Dec. 2020 New England’s offense only made one trip into the red zone for the entire game. Tim Bielik, cleveland, "How to watch every NFL game (12/25/20-12/28/20): Week 16 live streams, TV, odds," 25 Dec. 2020 Bledsoe and Redick never tested positive for coronavirus, but neither made the trip to Florida because of the NBA’s ultra-cautious protocol. Christian Clark | Staff Writer, NOLA.com, "'You're going to have to be adaptable': Pelicans prepare to begin season during pandemic," 15 Dec. 2020 The junior made the trip to State College but was in a sweatshirt on the sideline. Chris Solari, Detroit Free Press, "Payton Thorne shows promise, but Michigan State football falls apart at Penn State, 39-24," 12 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'trip.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of trip

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 3a

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 5

History and Etymology for trip

Verb

Middle English trippen, from Anglo-French treper, triper, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English treppan to tread — more at trap

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Time Traveler for trip

Time Traveler

The first known use of trip was in the 14th century

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Statistics for trip

Last Updated

31 Dec 2020

Cite this Entry

“Trip.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/trip. Accessed 17 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for trip

trip

verb
How to pronounce trip (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of trip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to hit your foot against something while you are walking or running so that you fall or almost fall
: to cause (someone who is walking or running) to fall or almost fall
literary : to dance or walk with light, quick steps

trip

noun

English Language Learners Definition of trip (Entry 2 of 2)

: a journey to a place
: a short journey to a store, business, office, etc., for a particular purpose
informal : the experience of strange mental effects (such as seeing things that are not real) that is produced by taking a very powerful drug (such as LSD)

trip

verb
\ ˈtrip How to pronounce trip (audio) \
tripped; tripping

Kids Definition of trip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to catch the foot against something so as to stumble : cause to stumble
2 : to make or cause to make a mistake Their tricky questions tripped us up.
3 : to move (as in dancing) with light quick steps She tripped lightly around the room.
4 : to release (as a spring) by moving a catch

trip

noun

Kids Definition of trip (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an instance of traveling from one place to another a trip to Europe
2 : a brief errand having a certain aim or being more or less regular a trip to the dentist
3 : the action of releasing something mechanically
4 : a device for releasing something by tripping a mechanism

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Comments on trip

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