hurry

verb
hur·ry | \ˈhər-ē, ˈhə-rē\
hurried; hurrying

Definition of hurry 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to carry or cause to go with haste hurry them to the hospital

b : to impel to rash or precipitate action that hard-to-be-governed passion of youth hurried me frequently into intrigues with low women— Benjamin Franklin

2a : to impel to greater speed : prod used spurs to hurry the horse

b : expedite asked them to hurry dinner

c : to perform with undue haste hurry a minuet

intransitive verb

: to move or act with haste please hurry up

hurry

noun

Definition of hurry (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : disturbed or disorderly activity : commotion the incessant hurry and trivial activity of daily life … seem to prevent, or at least discourage, quiet and intense thinking— C. W. Eliot

2a : agitated and often bustling or disorderly haste

b : a state of eagerness or urgency : rush was in a hurry to get home

in a hurry

: without delay : as rapidly as possible the police got there in a hurry

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Other Words from hurry

Verb

hurrier noun

Choose the Right Synonym for hurry

Noun

haste, hurry, speed, expedition, dispatch mean quickness in movement or action. haste applies to personal action and implies urgency and precipitancy and often rashness. marry in haste hurry often has a strong suggestion of agitated bustle or confusion. in the hurry of departure she forgot her toothbrush speed suggests swift efficiency in movement or action. exercises to increase your reading speed expedition and dispatch both imply speed and efficiency in handling affairs but expedition stresses ease or efficiency of performance and dispatch stresses promptness in concluding matters. the case came to trial with expedition paid bills with dispatch

Examples of hurry in a Sentence

Verb

Take your time. There's no need to hurry. She hurried off to her class. We hurried through the lesson so that we could finish early. The teacher hurried us through the lesson. They hurried the children off to bed. The quarterback was forced to hurry his throw.

Noun

In her hurry to leave she forgot her briefcase. after all her hurry to get her report done on time, Elizabeth learned that it wasn't due till the following week
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Lawmakers passed it on one of the last days of the legislative session, hurrying it through. NBC News, "Teacher beats Kentucky House majority leader in GOP primary," 23 May 2018 Lawmakers passed it on one of the last days of the legislative session, hurrying it through. Fox News, "Teacher upsets Kentucky House GOP leader in primary after protests," 22 May 2018 But if the Trump and the Republicans block the Democrats’ memo from public view, after having hurried to release the Nunes memo, they will be celebrated only by their core supporters—and viewed with further suspicion by the rest of the electorate. Matt Ford, New Republic, "Trump Is Trapped by the Democrats’ Memo," 7 Feb. 2018 Be honest with your preschool about your child's potty skills - but avoid pressuring your child to hurry up and learn to use the potty - before taking the step of enrolling them. Mary Caldwell, ajc, "6 things your child should know before entering preschool," 29 June 2018 On Monday, May hosted business leaders from aerospace to retail who urged her to hurry up. Tim Ross, Bloomberg.com, "May Plans Countryside Lock-in to End Cabinet War Over Brexit," 8 June 2018 So beginning in August 2016, workers hurried to connect 750 homes, the last of which tapped into Porterville this past February. Matt Simon, WIRED, "LA Is Doing Water Better Than Your City. Yes, That LA," 12 June 2018 In the meantime, Hammett and her husband hurried home to get shovels, and helped move the turtle safely out of the road. Janine Puhak, Fox News, "Police officer helps turtle cross road in torrential downpour," 7 June 2018 And perhaps the good monetary tidings will hurry along the negotiations between the chambers, which have both passed versions of a state spending plan but have not yet been able to reconcile them. Joshua Miller, BostonGlobe.com, "State lands tax windfall: $1.2 billion more than expected," 6 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The season ended with two tackles with a quarterback hurry in the win over LSU. Michael Casagrande, AL.com, "Why Alabama LB has not been at last 2 practices," 27 Mar. 2018 But, occasionally, a pedestrian is either in a hurry or changes their mind at the last moment and starts crossing the street, or even reverses direction. Matt Simon, WIRED, "Why Did the Human Cross the Road? To Confuse the Self-Driving Car," 10 July 2018 However, that turns around in a big hurry when pots start coming up with over 300 crab inside. Tyler Mccarthy, Fox News, "'Deadliest Catch' Season 14, Episode 14 recap: Tensions rise as crews members misbehave," 10 July 2018 Don’t be in a hurry to cut off the flower stems as one shoot is full of many blooms. Tom Maccubbin, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Cannas take to the summer sun," 5 July 2018 Baseball—and baseball fans—get sensitive about criticism, because old-fashioned baseball is an easy target in these go-go, hurry up modern times. Jason Gay, WSJ, "Reports of Baseball’s Popular Decline Are…Popular," 21 June 2018 Ruth, Velma and John were having lunch and not at all in a hurry to leave. Andrew M. Davenport, Smithsonian, "Putting Enslaved Families’ Stories Back in the Monticello Narrative," 14 June 2018 The migrating herds crossed the Richardson Highway in a hurry a month or so ago, and their numbers seemed a little light. John Schandelmeier, Anchorage Daily News, "It’s still springtime on the Denali Highway," 10 June 2018 Given a 2014 crash, those who plunked down the reservations may now not be a big hurry. Chris Woodyard, USA TODAY, "Buy this $85M N.Y. condo and get a free trip to outer space," 17 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'hurry.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of hurry

Verb

1592, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1600, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for hurry

Verb

perhaps from Middle English horyen

Noun

see hurry entry 1

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Statistics for hurry

Last Updated

19 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for hurry

The first known use of hurry was in 1592

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More Definitions for hurry

hurry

verb

English Language Learners Definition of hurry

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to move, act, or go quickly

: to make (someone) move, act, or go quickly

: to carry or send (someone or something) more quickly than usual

hurry

noun

English Language Learners Definition of hurry (Entry 2 of 2)

: a need to do something more quickly than usual

hurry

verb
hur·ry | \ˈhər-ē \
hurried; hurrying

Kids Definition of hurry

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to carry or cause to go with haste She is not someone who can be hurried.

2 : to move or act with haste She hurried off to school.

3 : to speed up Mechanics hurried the repair job.

hurry

noun

Kids Definition of hurry (Entry 2 of 2)

: a need to act or move more quickly than usual : rush

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More from Merriam-Webster on hurry

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for hurry

Spanish Central: Translation of hurry

Nglish: Translation of hurry for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of hurry for Arabic Speakers

Comments on hurry

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a state of commotion or excitement

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