hurry

1 of 2

verb

hur·​ry ˈhər-ē How to pronounce hurry (audio)
ˈhə-rē
hurried; hurrying

transitive verb

1
a
: to carry or cause to go with haste
hurry them to the hospital
b
: to impel to rash or precipitate action
that hard-to-be-governed passion of youth hurried me frequently into intrigues with low womenBenjamin Franklin
2
a
: to impel to greater speed : prod
used spurs to hurry the horse
b
: expedite
asked them to hurry dinner
c
: to perform with undue haste
hurry a minuet

intransitive verb

: to move or act with haste
please hurry up
hurrier noun

hurry

2 of 2

noun

1
: disturbed or disorderly activity : commotion
the incessant hurry and trivial activity of daily life … seem to prevent, or at least discourage, quiet and intense thinkingC. W. Eliot
2
a
: agitated and often bustling or disorderly haste
b
: a state of eagerness or urgency : rush
was in a hurry to get home
Phrases
in a hurry
: without delay : as rapidly as possible
the police got there in a hurry
Choose the Right Synonym for hurry

haste, hurry, speed, expedition, dispatch mean quickness in movement or action.

haste applies to personal action and implies urgency and precipitancy and often rashness.

marry in haste

hurry often has a strong suggestion of agitated bustle or confusion.

in the hurry of departure she forgot her toothbrush

speed suggests swift efficiency in movement or action.

exercises to increase your reading speed

expedition and dispatch both imply speed and efficiency in handling affairs but expedition stresses ease or efficiency of performance and dispatch stresses promptness in concluding matters.

the case came to trial with expedition
paid bills with dispatch

Examples of hurry in a Sentence

Verb Take your time. There's no need to hurry. She hurried off to her class. We hurried through the lesson so that we could finish early. The teacher hurried us through the lesson. They hurried the children off to bed. The quarterback was forced to hurry his throw. Noun In her hurry to leave she forgot her briefcase. after all her hurry to get her report done on time, Elizabeth learned that it wasn't due till the following week See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
The show moved swiftly along, almost as if folks were hurrying to get somewhere else. Aramide Tinubu, Variety, 16 Jan. 2024 Some parents were already on their way to work and had to hurry to figure out pickup plans and child care. Nicole Asbury, Washington Post, 9 Jan. 2024 After news spread of the attack, the couple hurried with Hadar and Carmel into their safe room, a spare bedroom on the ground floor. Patrick Kingsley, New York Times, 22 Dec. 2023 Someone who appeared to be with arena security hurried to the fan, said a few words and gently nudged him toward the exit. Chuck Schilken, Los Angeles Times, 16 Jan. 2024 But hurry, both are expected to sell out before the long weekend is over. Alesandra Dubin, Travel + Leisure, 15 Jan. 2024 Whenever Hamas fired rockets from Gaza, families hurried into rocket-proof safe rooms, often a child’s bedroom. Patrick Kingsley, New York Times, 22 Dec. 2023 Rose clung to a pier piling in the surging water as a lifeguard hurried over on his own board before helping him back to the beach. Alastair Bland, Smithsonian Magazine, 12 Jan. 2024 These ’90s-style sneakers are designed with velcro strap closures which are especially convenient when hurrying through TSA in the airport or rushing out of your hotel for a day of sightseeing. Merrell Readman, Travel + Leisure, 10 Jan. 2024
Noun
The volume dumped by the second storm is expected to be significantly greater because the storm system isn’t in as big a hurry to leave Southern California. Jon Healey, Los Angeles Times, 1 Feb. 2024 Eat everything – food garbage gets gross in a hurry and attracts animals. Cindy Dampier, Charlotte Observer, 31 Jan. 2024 Recent data showing inflation continuing to recede and resilient US economic growth suggest central bankers won’t be in a hurry to cut interest rates. Jeran Wittenstein, Fortune, 28 Jan. 2024 The Fed will likely not be in a hurry to cut rates, if the data continues to come in this hot. CBS News, 25 Jan. 2024 Don’t be in a hurry and don’t try to double or triple task while making biscotti. Jacalyn Carfagno, Charlotte Observer, 24 Jan. 2024 Magee booms at a customer who appears in a hurry to exit through a side door instead of the congested front door. Jill Wendholt Silva, Kansas City Star, 24 Jan. 2024 Of course, these projections can fly out the window in a hurry. Shelby Dermer, The Enquirer, 9 Jan. 2024 And Mexico doesn’t seem to be in much hurry to solve the problem on its side. WSJ, 12 Dec. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'hurry.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb and Noun

perhaps from Middle English horyen

First Known Use

Verb

1592, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1600, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of hurry was in 1592

Dictionary Entries Near hurry

Cite this Entry

“Hurry.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hurry. Accessed 20 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

hurry

1 of 2 verb
hur·​ry ˈhər-ē How to pronounce hurry (audio)
ˈhə-rē
hurried; hurrying
1
a
: to carry or cause to go with haste
hurry the child to the hospital
b
: to move or act with haste
had to hurry to arrive in time
2
a
: to urge on to greater speed : prod
b
: to hasten the doing of
hurry a repair job
hurrier noun

hurry

2 of 2 noun
plural hurries
1
: great speed
especially : unnecessary haste
2
: a state of eagerness or urgency : rush

More from Merriam-Webster on hurry

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