hurry

verb
hur·​ry | \ ˈhər-ē How to pronounce hurry (audio) , ˈhə-rē\
hurried; hurrying

Definition of hurry

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to carry or cause to go with haste hurry them to the hospital
b : to impel to rash or precipitate action that hard-to-be-governed passion of youth hurried me frequently into intrigues with low women— Benjamin Franklin
2a : to impel to greater speed : prod used spurs to hurry the horse
b : expedite asked them to hurry dinner
c : to perform with undue haste hurry a minuet

intransitive verb

: to move or act with haste please hurry up

hurry

noun

Definition of hurry (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : disturbed or disorderly activity : commotion the incessant hurry and trivial activity of daily life … seem to prevent, or at least discourage, quiet and intense thinking— C. W. Eliot
2a : agitated and often bustling or disorderly haste
b : a state of eagerness or urgency : rush was in a hurry to get home
in a hurry
: without delay : as rapidly as possible the police got there in a hurry

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Other Words from hurry

Verb

hurrier noun

Choose the Right Synonym for hurry

Noun

haste, hurry, speed, expedition, dispatch mean quickness in movement or action. haste applies to personal action and implies urgency and precipitancy and often rashness. marry in haste hurry often has a strong suggestion of agitated bustle or confusion. in the hurry of departure she forgot her toothbrush speed suggests swift efficiency in movement or action. exercises to increase your reading speed expedition and dispatch both imply speed and efficiency in handling affairs but expedition stresses ease or efficiency of performance and dispatch stresses promptness in concluding matters. the case came to trial with expedition paid bills with dispatch

Examples of hurry in a Sentence

Verb

Take your time. There's no need to hurry. She hurried off to her class. We hurried through the lesson so that we could finish early. The teacher hurried us through the lesson. They hurried the children off to bed. The quarterback was forced to hurry his throw.

Noun

In her hurry to leave she forgot her briefcase. after all her hurry to get her report done on time, Elizabeth learned that it wasn't due till the following week
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The big event lasts until July 18, but hurry fast because the deals won't last forever. Tanisha Pina, Allure, "Maybelline New York Just Launched Exclusive Beauty Bundles for Amazon Prime Day," 16 July 2018 The new series is a reality baking competition that has the players hurrying to create sweet treats against the clock. Matthew Gilbert, BostonGlobe.com, "This week: Paris Hilton, a psychic, and sweet treats," 8 July 2018 But his schedule has been remarkably hurried: The Preakness will be his fifth career race and all within just 91 days. Tim Layden, SI.com, "Can Justify Overcome Obstacles to Move Closer to History at the Preakness?," 17 May 2018 Serena, who is now determined to get June out of the house, wants to hurry up this birth. refinery29.com, "The Handmaid's Tale Season 2, Episode 10 Recap: This One Hits Too Close To Home, You Guys," 20 June 2018 To hurry Mr Snyder along, the state Senate also passed a budget which would suspend the salaries of top health officials if the Medicaid reforms are not speedy enough. The Economist, "How the Trump administration is reshaping Medicaid," 17 May 2018 Sephora needs to hurry up with those other cities — STAT! Elizabeth Denton, Seventeen, "Finally! Sephora is Launching Its Own Beauty Box Subscription," 7 Aug. 2015 China and other countries hurried to buy up products, and exporters rushed to get them out before tariffs were put in place. Emily Stewart, Vox, "Trump’s economic victory lap is full of embellishments and exaggerations," 29 July 2018 At L’ovue, a big, airy space just a block away, Kim hurries over to a row of waterproof mascaras and selects her favorite by the Japanese label Kiss Me. Kate Branch, Vogue, "This Fantastic Beasts 2 Star Has a Serious Knack for K-Beauty," 17 Nov. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Stylish and practical as Ruth, Samsock and the skittish Edith, who is always in a hurry, start the comedy warming. Patti Restivo, Howard County Times, "Spirited comedy, courtesy of APL scientists," 19 Apr. 2018 His words come in a hurry, his raspy voice dancing across three decades in the ring. Zak Keefer, Indianapolis Star, "He’s nearly blind. He’s flat broke. But he carries Olympic gold in his pocket.," 11 Apr. 2018 Vacancy conveys lack of hurry, lack of pressure, lack of confinement — but not too much lack of confinement. Mark Feeney, BostonGlobe.com, "Coloring our world, from cave paintings to today," 15 Mar. 2018 Team Rutgers suffered an accidental discharge at first but recovered with a flight of more than 60 feet in a hurry-up attempt. Scientific American, "The 2017 Alka-Rocket Challenge Wrap Up," 10 Nov. 2017 Doing so would make them—and the financial system as a whole—far more vulnerable in a moment of panic, when everybody wants to withdraw assets in a hurry. Kimberly Harrington, The New Yorker, "The Dangers of Undoing Dodd-Frank," 24 July 2017 Another Xinhua report suggests that the regime is in no hurry to give up that old-time anti-religion: China’s reform has inspired the world: developing countries can walk a new path to modernization that is different from the West. James Freeman, WSJ, "Human Extinction: Hot Again," 18 Dec. 2018 According to the Mail's royal sources, the apartment is currently occupied by the Queen’s cousin, the Duke of Gloucester, 74, and his wife, Birgitte, 72, who are in no hurry to leave, apparently. Kayleigh Roberts, Marie Claire, "Prince Harry and Meghan Meghan Are Reportedly Looking to Leave Kensington Palace All Together," 18 Nov. 2018 However, Twitter seems in no hurry to push changes out the door. Aja Romano, Vox, "Twitter’s rumored killing of the “like” button highlights its misplaced priorities," 29 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'hurry.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of hurry

Verb

1592, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1600, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for hurry

Verb and Noun

perhaps from Middle English horyen

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Statistics for hurry

Last Updated

9 Mar 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for hurry

The first known use of hurry was in 1592

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More Definitions for hurry

hurry

verb

English Language Learners Definition of hurry

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to move, act, or go quickly
: to make (someone) move, act, or go quickly
: to carry or send (someone or something) more quickly than usual

hurry

noun

English Language Learners Definition of hurry (Entry 2 of 2)

: a need to do something more quickly than usual

hurry

verb
hur·​ry | \ ˈhər-ē How to pronounce hurry (audio) \
hurried; hurrying

Kids Definition of hurry

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to carry or cause to go with haste She is not someone who can be hurried.
2 : to move or act with haste She hurried off to school.
3 : to speed up Mechanics hurried the repair job.

hurry

noun

Kids Definition of hurry (Entry 2 of 2)

: a need to act or move more quickly than usual : rush

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More from Merriam-Webster on hurry

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for hurry

Spanish Central: Translation of hurry

Nglish: Translation of hurry for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of hurry for Arabic Speakers

Comments on hurry

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