voyage

noun
voy·​age | \ ˈvȯi-ij How to pronounce voyage (audio) , ˈvȯ(-)ij \

Definition of voyage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an act or instance of traveling : journey
2 : a course or period of traveling by other than land routes a long sea voyage
3 : an account of a journey especially by sea

voyage

verb
voyaged; voyaging

Definition of voyage (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to take a trip : travel

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Other Words from voyage

Verb

voyager noun

Synonyms for voyage

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of voyage in a Sentence

Noun The Titanic sank on her maiden voyage. He wrote about his many voyages into the South Seas. a manned voyage to Mars Verb They voyaged to distant lands. He spent his youth voyaging around the globe.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun These days the roundtrip is marketed internationally as a coastal voyage cruise. David Nikel, Forbes, 10 Sep. 2021 This 2,218-passenger Celebrity Millennium voyage delivers high-energy vibes. Janice Wald Henderson, Condé Nast Traveler, 6 Sep. 2021 Radiance will have a new maiden voyage data on December 13 out of Long Beach. al, 2 Sep. 2021 Francis Kurkdijian’s dreamy floral mixes Jamaican Amyris—a flowering plant with a rich citrus scent—and Florentine iris to create a voyage for the senses. Janelle Okwodu, Vogue, 20 Aug. 2021 As a cruise line with a large population of passengers under the age of 12, who do not have a vaccine option available to them, Disney has opted for the simulated voyage approach. Richard Tribou, orlandosentinel.com, 17 Aug. 2021 Last year, a converted ocean-racing catamaran, known as the Energy Observer, completed a 5,000-nautical mile transatlantic voyage from France to the Caribbean using a hydrogen fuel cell and solar power. Rachel Cormack, Robb Report, 17 Aug. 2021 Livable planets would be unreachable using even the most advanced technology available today—there are none within a ten-thousand-year voyage of us. The New Yorker, 16 Aug. 2021 Some passengers on this voyage, such as Susan Staffa, were on the Edge's final sailing in March 2020. Natasha Chen And Kevin Conlon, CNN, 28 June 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The two men would voyage together to temple — Singh by foot, the man on a bike — every Sunday. Johnny Magdaleno, The Indianapolis Star, 21 Apr. 2021 With the canal blocked, ships would have to voyage around Africa’s Cape of Good Hope, adding 12 to 21 days to the journey and tens of thousands of dollars in extra fuel costs. Los Angeles Times, 28 Mar. 2021 The train will voyage along the Colorado River, passing through steep rock canyons and breathtaking desert scenes along the way. Ali Wunderman, Condé Nast Traveler, 7 Dec. 2020 Their otherworldliness is crucial because while all fiction depends on some kind of contract between creators and audiences, musicals also rely on us agreeing to voyage beyond consensus reality. Manohla Dargis, New York Times, 7 May 2020 Last September, Michael Pachter paid $13,400 for a four-person cruise on Norwegian Cruise Line departing June 15 and voyaging through Italy. Morgan Hines, USA TODAY, 1 May 2020 Stretching over 30 feet, the Irish Memorial features 35 life-size bronze figures, some starving in Ireland, others voyaging to the United States. Harrison Smith, BostonGlobe.com, 17 Apr. 2020 Another Princess cruise ship that voyaged to Hawaii has recently become associated with a series of coronavirus infections and one death in Northern California. Minhae Shim Roth, Glamour, 9 Mar. 2020 Researchers also hope to start unravelling how interstellar objects might have voyaged through deep space before showing up in the Solar System. Alexandra Witze, Scientific American, 27 Nov. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'voyage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of voyage

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for voyage

Noun

Middle English viage, veyage, from Anglo-French veiage, from Late Latin viaticum, from Latin, traveling money, from neuter of viaticus of a journey, from via way — more at way

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Time Traveler for voyage

Time Traveler

The first known use of voyage was in the 14th century

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Statistics for voyage

Last Updated

12 Sep 2021

Cite this Entry

“Voyage.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/voyage. Accessed 23 Sep. 2021.

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More Definitions for voyage

voyage

noun

English Language Learners Definition of voyage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a long journey to a distant or unknown place especially over water or through outer space

voyage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of voyage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to take a long journey usually by ship or boat

voyage

noun
voy·​age | \ ˈvȯi-ij How to pronounce voyage (audio) \

Kids Definition of voyage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a journey especially by water to a distant or unknown place

voyage

verb
voyaged; voyaging

Kids Definition of voyage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to take a long trip usually by boat The explorers voyaged to distant lands.

Other Words from voyage

voyager noun

More from Merriam-Webster on voyage

Nglish: Translation of voyage for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of voyage for Arabic Speakers

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