trek

verb
\ ˈtrek How to pronounce trek (audio) \
trekked; trekking

Definition of trek

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to make one's way arduously broadly : journey
2 chiefly South Africa
a : to travel by ox wagon
b : to migrate by ox wagon or in a train of such

trek

noun

Definition of trek (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a trip or movement especially when involving difficulties or complex organization : an arduous journey
2 chiefly South Africa : a journey by ox wagon especially : an organized migration by a group of settlers

Other Words from trek

Verb

trekker noun

Examples of trek in a Sentence

Verb We had to trek up six flights of stairs with our groceries. On their vacation last year they went trekking in the Himalayas. We trekked across the country in her old car. Noun Our car broke down and we had a long trek back to town. a trek across the country
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Gorilla's Nest, a resort from which guests can trek to see the mountain gorillas that inhabit the forests here. Stefanie Waldek, Travel + Leisure, 31 Dec. 2021 On a trip to Hallasan National Park, visitors are free to trek along lengthy hiking trails in search of native wildlife, all while enjoying the gentle ambiance of South Korea’s tallest mountain. Jared Ranahan, Forbes, 28 Dec. 2021 Heavy rains slammed New York City on Thursday, forcing some commuters to trek through spontaneous lakes as water flooded streets and gushed into subway stations. Washington Post, 9 July 2021 Oregon wine fans trek to Hood River to suck up Viento wines like anteaters armed with straws. Michael Alberty | For The Oregonian/oregonlive, oregonlive, 29 Nov. 2021 Mother sea lions can trek more than a mile into a forest for safety. Rasha Aridi, Smithsonian Magazine, 11 Nov. 2021 After cruising through the winding alpine roads, taking in the breeze off of the lake, travelers can trek through the quiet, stonewalled homes and trellises into the forest. Josh Max, Forbes, 7 Oct. 2021 From there, Chandi will trek solo 700 miles across the ice to the pole, hauling a sled weighing 90 kilograms (nearly 200 pounds) with all her kit, fuel and food for around 45 days. Laura Smith-spark And Francesca Street, CNN, 6 Nov. 2021 Thereafter, Pamela’s remnant moisture will become swept up in a cold front and enhance a line of brief heavy downpours that will trek toward the East Coast by Saturday. Washington Post, 13 Oct. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Coined the Mexicana Enamorada tour (produced by Live Nation), the rising Regional Mexican star kicks off her 12-city trek on March 18, 2022, at the Arizona Federal Theatre in Phoenix and wraps on April 24 in Chicago. Billboard Staff, Billboard, 10 Jan. 2022 Tarcy Connors reports in the San Diego Union-Tribute about her 15-day trek in the Himalayas. Los Angeles Times, 6 Jan. 2022 Her trek was also a fundraising effort to create an annual adventure grant for women. Frederick Dreier, Outside Online, 5 Jan. 2022 Gould was on her annual trek to Florida when traffic stopped Monday afternoon. NBC News, 4 Jan. 2022 The Australian rapper is launching the End of the World Tour, his first headlining global trek, in downtown Phoenix. Ed Masley, The Arizona Republic, 1 Jan. 2022 The tornado originated in Arkansas before beginning its trek through Tennessee and ripping through Kentucky from Fulton to Ohio counties, NWS Paducah's preliminary research shows. Sarah Ladd, The Courier-Journal, 17 Dec. 2021 And Devin and Emy finally start their trek back down the mountain with the hope that both teams ahead of them somehow mess up entering their codes. Sydney Bucksbaum, EW.com, 16 Dec. 2021 As part of a collaboration with NASA, Stanford University, and the European Space Agency, 57-year-old Justin Packshaw and 37-year-old Jamie Facer Childs will record the physical and mental toll of their 80-day trek. Corryn Wetzel, Smithsonian Magazine, 14 Dec. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'trek.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of trek

Verb

1835, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Noun

1849, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for trek

Verb

Afrikaans, from Dutch trecken to pull, haul, migrate; akin to Old High German trechan to pull

Noun

Afrikaans, from Dutch treck pull, haul, from trecken

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Dictionary Entries Near trek

Treitz's muscle

trek

trekboer

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Statistics for trek

Last Updated

12 Jan 2022

Cite this Entry

“Trek.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/trek. Accessed 19 Jan. 2022.

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More Definitions for trek

trek

verb

English Language Learners Definition of trek

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to walk usually for a long distance
: to travel by walking through an area with many mountains, rivers, etc., for pleasure and adventure
: to go on a long and often difficult journey

trek

noun

English Language Learners Definition of trek (Entry 2 of 2)

: a long and difficult journey that is made especially by walking

trek

verb
\ ˈtrek How to pronounce trek (audio) \
trekked; trekking

Kids Definition of trek

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to walk a long way with difficulty … two adults were trekking up the sixty-six-floor-long staircase.— Lemony Snicket, The Ersatz Elevator

trek

noun

Kids Definition of trek (Entry 2 of 2)

: a slow or difficult journey

More from Merriam-Webster on trek

Nglish: Translation of trek for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of trek for Arabic Speakers

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