thick

adjective
\ ˈthik How to pronounce thick (audio) \

Definition of thick

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : having or being of relatively great depth or extent from one surface to its opposite a thick plank
b : heavily built : thickset
2a : close-packed with units or individuals the air was thick with snow
b : occurring in large numbers : numerous
c : viscous in consistency thick syrup
d : sultry, stuffy
e : marked by haze, fog, or mist thick weather
f : impenetrable to the eye : profound thick darkness
g : extremely intense thick silence
3 : measuring in thickness 12 inches thick
4a : imperfectly articulated : indistinct thick speech
b : plainly apparent : decided a thick French accent
c : producing inarticulate speech a thick tongue
5 : obtuse, stupid too thick to understand
6 : associated on close terms : intimate was quite thick with his pastor
7 : exceeding bounds of propriety or fitness : excessive called it a bit thick to be fired without warning
thick on the ground

thick

adverb

Definition of thick (Entry 2 of 3)

: in a thick manner : thickly

thick

noun

Definition of thick (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : the most crowded or active part in the thick of the battle
2 : the part of greatest thickness the thick of the thumb

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Other Words from thick

Adjective

thickish \ ˈthi-​kish How to pronounce thick (audio) \ adjective
thickly adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for thick

Synonyms: Adjective

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Adjective

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Examples of thick in a Sentence

Adjective a thick layer of ice a thick slice of ham pizza with a thick crust a bodybuilder with a thick, short body The planks were two inches thick. The log was 12 inches thick. a dog with thick fur She has thick, curly hair. The fog was thick this morning. Adverb Apples hung thick on the trees. Noun in the thick of winter many Northerners are dreaming of tropical islands
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Buy only fresh seafood that is refrigerated or displayed on thick layers of ice. Darlene Zimmerman, Detroit Free Press, "Asian flavors enhance salmon cooked in parchment paper," 4 Apr. 2021 That’s why thick barriers of hedges or fences without gaps are effective. Angela Watson, chicagotribune.com, "How to keep deer out of the garden," 4 Apr. 2021 Mired in the thick clay, mesquite and cottonwood trees died. Ian James, The Arizona Republic, "Along the San Pedro River, a conservationist's dream of restoring habitat has dimmed," 3 Apr. 2021 When there are lots of oak leaves, use them as a 2-3-inch mulch around shrubs or other trees, add them to the compost pile or create thick layers to form garden paths. Tom Maccubbin, orlandosentinel.com, "Warm weather will help regreen desert roses," 3 Apr. 2021 The government had also given money to his partner, a mysterious Maiduguri woman who called herself Mama Boko Haram and boasted of having once cooked thick, oily egusi, a protein-rich Nigerian stew, for Abubakar Shekau, the leader of Boko Haram. Joe Parkinson, The Atlantic, "When America Couldn’t Bring Back Our Girls," 3 Apr. 2021 Diana the Musical announced its return on December 1, one of the first Broadway shows to offer a concrete date — and the thick band of non-profit venues that make up most of the city’s serious theatrical output are taking their time as well. Helen Shaw, Vulture, "What Happens to New York Theater on April 2?," 2 Apr. 2021 The National Park Service stands poised to limit access to the Tidal Basin and its high concentration of cherry blossom trees if the crowds there grow too thick. From Usa Today Network And Wire Reports, USA TODAY, "Cherry blossom crowds, roller coaster return, farmworker fears: News from around our 50 states," 2 Apr. 2021 This trendy color-block suit offers a figure-flattering tie waist and thick straps for plenty of support. Jenna Sims, Southern Living, "The Best One-Piece Swimsuits You Can Buy on Amazon," 2 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adverb Garner, wearing thick-rimmed glasses and a cozy sweater, posted the same photo on her Instagram. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Mark Ruffalo and Jennifer Garner Had a 13 Going on 30 Reunion," 24 Feb. 2021 That rule applies whether the bacon is thick-cut or thin, hickory or maple-smoked, the fancy stuff or the cheap stuff. Lisa Cericola, Southern Living, "How Long Does Bacon Last in the Fridge?," 7 Feb. 2021 His thick-rimmed, dark sunglasses look like something out of a Tarantino film. Lorraine Ali, Los Angeles Times, "Commentary: 49 years ago, D.B. Cooper became an ideal hero for cynical times. He still is," 25 Nov. 2020 Mayhew Bakery is making calzones now, too, and thick-crusted, rectangular Sicilian pizza makes periodic appearances as specials. Ian Mcnulty, NOLA.com, "Pizza, often the answer to life's problems, proves a lifeline for one Mid-City bakery," 30 Sep. 2020 The thick-rimmed, cast-magnesium three-spoke wheel provides a seductive combination of stability and immediate responsiveness. Csaba Csere, Car and Driver, "Tested: 2003 Nissan 350Z Returns to Its Roots," 16 Sep. 2020 Food Cartel pod, where the brisket is salt-rubbed and thick-sliced with juicy meat under a jiggling fat cap. Michael Russell, oregonlive, "Great barbecue in Beaverton? Head to Wolf’s Head Smokehouse," 2 Sep. 2020 The bird will now be known as the thick-billed longspur. Aj Willingham, CNN, "A bird named for a Confederate general officially has a new identity," 13 Aug. 2020 After a concerted push, including by Black birders, the American Ornithological Society has changed the name of the McCown’s longspur to the thick-billed longspur. Zachary Lewis, Washington Post, "A small bird sheds its Confederate past with a new name," 11 Aug. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The Sabres, in town for Saturday’s matinee, arrived in the thick of the a mind-numbing 0-14-2 stretch dating to their last win, Feb. 23 vs. the Devils. BostonGlobe.com, "NHL responded quickly to Tim Peel/hot microphone episode," 27 Mar. 2021 There is less than half a season remaining and Dallas remains very much in the thick of the Central Division playoff race. Matthew Defranks, Dallas News, "Matt’s Mail: ‘Beast Mode’ has been missing, but Jamie Benn is still a physical force on the ice for Stars," 26 Mar. 2021 The two also have their respective teams in the thick of the Western Conference playoff race. Matt Eppers, USA TODAY, "Lakers star LeBron James stirs the NBA MVP debate: 'I should have more than four'," 19 Mar. 2021 That could mean helping your elderly neighbors secure vaccine appointments, volunteering your time with an organization involved with COVID-19 relief, or simply being a supportive friend to someone in the thick of their own trauma. Marnie Schwartz, refinery29.com, "There’s No Silver Lining To COVID, But There Is The Potential For Post-Traumatic Growth," 18 Mar. 2021 This approach works best in the Army scenes, where Cherry goes through basic training, becomes a medic and ultimately ends up in the thick of battles, treating horrific wounds. Noel Murray, Los Angeles Times, "Review: Overamped ‘Cherry’ takes on plight of PTSD-afflicted war veteran," 11 Mar. 2021 So what does help when a friend or family member is in the thick of caregiving, or any crisis? Kate Washington, Time, "Don’t Tell a Caregiver to Stay Positive. Here’s How to Help Instead," 9 Mar. 2021 Rhodes was in the thick of it, DOJ documents claim. Erin Mansfield, USA TODAY, "Prosecutors: Oath Keepers leader stood outside Capitol on Jan. 6 as members stormed inside," 9 Mar. 2021 The joy has returned, to his face and body language, and the Mavericks are again flourishing and back in the thick of the playoff picture. Dallas News, "How Luka Doncic’s contagious confidence turned around the Mavericks’ early season struggles," 5 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'thick.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of thick

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adverb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for thick

Adjective

Middle English thikke, from Old English thicce; akin to Old High German dicki thick, Old Irish tiug

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Time Traveler for thick

Time Traveler

The first known use of thick was before the 12th century

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Statistics for thick

Last Updated

6 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Thick.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/thick. Accessed 15 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for thick

thick

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of thick

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: having a large distance between the top and bottom or front and back surfaces : not thin
: having a specified distance from one surface to the opposite surface : having a specified thickness
: having parts that are close together

thick

adverb

English Language Learners Definition of thick (Entry 2 of 2)

: in a way that makes thick pieces, layers, etc.
: in great numbers

thick

adjective
\ ˈthik How to pronounce thick (audio) \
thicker; thickest

Kids Definition of thick

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : having great size from one surface to its opposite a thick wall
2 : closely packed together thick hair a thick clump of bushes
3 : heavily built a thick neck
4 : not flowing easily a thick milk shake
5 : measuring a certain amount in the smallest of three dimensions two millimeters thick
6 : producing speech that is hard to understand She speaks with a thick accent.
8 : occurring in large numbers : numerous Mosquitoes were thick in the swamp.
9 : having haze, fog, or mist The air was thick.
10 : too intense to see in thick darkness

Other Words from thick

thickly adverb

thick

noun

Kids Definition of thick (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the most crowded or active part The soldier was in the thick of the battle.
2 : the part of greatest thickness the thick of the thumb

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More from Merriam-Webster on thick

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for thick

Nglish: Translation of thick for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of thick for Arabic Speakers

Comments on thick

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