profound

adjective
pro·​found | \ prə-ˈfau̇nd How to pronounce profound (audio) , prō- \

Definition of profound

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : having intellectual depth and insight
b : difficult to fathom or understand
2a : extending far below the surface
b : coming from, reaching to, or situated at a depth : deep-seated a profound sigh
3a : characterized by intensity of feeling or quality
b : all encompassing : complete profound sleep profound deafness

profound

noun
pro·​found | \ prə-ˈfau̇nd How to pronounce profound (audio) , prō- \

Definition of profound (Entry 2 of 2)

archaic
: something that is very deep specifically : the depths of the sea

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Other Words from profound

Adjective

profoundly \ prə-​ˈfau̇n(d)-​lē How to pronounce profoundly (audio) , prō-​ \ adverb
profoundness \ prə-​ˈfau̇n(d)-​nəs How to pronounce profoundness (audio) , prō-​ \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for profound

Synonyms: Adjective

Antonyms: Adjective

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Examples of profound in a Sentence

Adjective Here, for the first time, a journalist gains access to the archive of one of the most comprehensive longitudinal studies in history. Its contents, as much literature as science, offer profound insight into the human condition—and into the brilliant, complex mind of the study's longtime director, George Vaillant. — Joshua Wolf Shenk, Atlantic, June 2009 This isn't escapism, or denial of grief; it is acceptance of the facts of life, the map of profound relationship to the grief that is part of life … — Tom Piazza, Why New Orleans Matters, 2005 The status of women, though probably the most profound single difference between the two civilizations, attracted far less attention than such matters as guns, factories and parliaments. — Bernard Lewis, What Went Wrong?, 2002 Despite all the respect, it was hard not to feel a twinge of schadenfreude at O'Hara's fall from esteem, which had caused him profound bitterness. — Kingsley Amis, Memoirs, 1991 His knowledge of history is profound. Her books offer profound insights into the true nature of courage. the profound mysteries of outer space a profound sense of loss His paintings have had a profound effect on her own work.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective He and his research team at Rockefeller University in Manhattan discovered in 1968 that stress hormones had a profound effect on the brain. Randi Hutter Epstein, New York Times, "Bruce McEwen, 81, Is Dead; Found Stress Can Alter the Brain," 10 Feb. 2020 This is important to understand because even off-site incidents can have a profound effect on employee relations in the workplace. Johnny C. Taylor Jr., USA TODAY, "My co-worker made a sexually suggestive remark at a company happy hour: Ask HR," 4 Feb. 2020 What gets built will have a profound effect on the skyline — for better or worse. John King, SFChronicle.com, "Transbay still being transformed — and more towers are on the way," 3 Feb. 2020 His speeches—some of the most iconic of the 20th century—had a profound effect on the national consciousness. National Geographic, "Who was Martin Luther King, Jr.?," 15 Jan. 2020 The sheer numbers involved had a profound effect on our understanding of planet formation. John Timmer, Ars Technica, "The 2010s: Decade of the exoplanet," 31 Dec. 2019 They are driven by a growing consensus that the experiences of children in the first years of life can have profound effects on their development, their academic and career outcomes and society as a whole. Annysa Johnson, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Wisconsin's child care, early education efforts get $10 million boost," 26 Dec. 2019 Weather routing makes ships more efficient since waves, wind, and currents all have profound effects on resistance in the water (and fuel bills). Michael J. Coren, Quartz, "Seagoing drones are eliminating the data gap on Earth’s last frontier," 4 Dec. 2019 The show also had a profound effect on her personal life. Carrie Battan, Town & Country, "Keri Russell Is the Secret Force Behind Star Wars," 25 Nov. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'profound.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of profound

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1621, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for profound

Adjective and Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French parfunt, profond deep, from Latin profundus, from pro- before + fundus bottom — more at pro-, bottom

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Time Traveler for profound

Time Traveler

The first known use of profound was in the 14th century

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Statistics for profound

Last Updated

18 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Profound.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/profound. Accessed 18 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for profound

profound

adjective
How to pronounce profound (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of profound

: having or showing great knowledge or understanding
: difficult to understand : requiring deep thought or wisdom
: very strongly felt

profound

adjective
pro·​found | \ prə-ˈfau̇nd How to pronounce profound (audio) \

Kids Definition of profound

1 : having or showing great knowledge and understanding a profound thinker
2 : very deeply felt profound sorrow

Other Words from profound

profoundly adverb

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