intensive

adjective
in·​ten·​sive | \ in-ˈten(t)-siv How to pronounce intensive (audio) \

Definition of intensive

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: of, relating to, or marked by intensity or intensification: such as
a : highly concentrated intensive study
b : tending to strengthen or increase especially : tending to give force or emphasis intensive adverb
c : constituting or relating to a method designed to increase productivity by the expenditure of more capital and labor rather than by increase in scope intensive farming

intensive

noun

Definition of intensive (Entry 2 of 2)

: an intensive linguistic element

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from intensive

Adjective

intensively adverb
intensiveness noun

intensive purposes or intents and purposes?

If you are casting about for the phrase that is used to say that “one thing has the same effect or result as something else,” you are looking for for all intents and purposes; you are not looking for intensive purposes. Your purposes may indeed be intensive in some way (we don’t want to know the details), but these two words are not commonly found together as an idiom. The pairing of intents and purposes comes from a 1546 Act of Parliament conveying that King Henry VIII had unlimited power to interpret laws; it contained the phrase “to all intents, constructions, and purposes.”

Examples of intensive in a Sentence

Adjective

an intensive course in business writing an intensive effort to prevent an adult bookstore from opening in town

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Flying is one of the most carbon-intensive activities a person can undertake. J.d. Morris, SFChronicle.com, "California trumpets its climate leadership. But wildfires and flying could stymie its goals," 16 Sep. 2019 Extracting them from the earth is an energy-intensive process that can damage local ecosystems. National Geographic, "The environmental impacts of cars, explained," 15 Sep. 2019 This time the Energy Department issued two final rules that will prolong the life of certain old-fashioned – and energy-intensive – incandescent lightbulbs invented by Thomas Edison 140 years ago. The Washington Post, Twin Cities, "Energy Department scraps light bulb standards set during Obama era," 6 Sep. 2019 Such partnerships are most often found in capital-intensive industries such as oil field logistics, which includes pipeline systems and terminals. Greg Jefferson, ExpressNews.com, "San Antonio’s NuStar Energy posts strong 2Q earnings," 8 Aug. 2019 Energy spending in Louisiana reached 13.5 percent of GDP in 2017, more than any other state, a product of the high concentration of energy-intensive industries like petrochemical manufacturing, the EIA said. James Osborne, Houston Chronicle, "U.S. energy spending rising again," 6 Aug. 2019 That is a step up from the last few years of the Obama Administration, when a slide in oil prices led to big cutbacks in the capital-intensive energy industry, which previously had been expanding at a rapid clip. John Cassidy, The New Yorker, "A Decline in Capital Investment Reveals the False Promise of Trump’s Tax Bill," 30 July 2019 Chinese leaders had also become increasingly willing to lower protective walls around the country’s labor-intensive, low-tech industries so as to focus on more sophisticated manufacturing. Keith Bradsher, New York Times, "China Needs New Places to Sell Its Mountain of Stuff," 26 July 2019 Costs are great for an upstart competitor to compete in one of the most capital-intensive industries in the world. Chris Isidore, CNN, "Boeing and Airbus made huge mistakes, but their dominance is under no threat," 25 June 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The non-profit holds annual summer intensives in each country, during which notable songwriters and producers teach collaborative songwriting, music production and music business in an effort to foster local talent. Chris Eggertsen, Billboard, "Warner Music's ADA Signs Global Distribution Deal with Music Education Non-Profit Nvak," 23 Aug. 2019 In addition to the U.S., Spotify has also held Sound Up intensives in Australia, Brazil, and the U.K. Chris Eggertsen, Billboard, "Spotify Announces Return of 'Sound Up' Podcast Accelerator for Women of Color," 7 June 2019 So Hong Kong has become a central hub for short-term theological intensives, distance Bible seminaries and networking conventions. Time, "Guerrillas for God: How Hong Kong’s Pastors Are Delivering the Message to China’s Christians," 5 Mar. 2018 Some students compete nearly every weekend during the season, which runs approximately September to July, and train at intensives and classes during the rest of the year. Lizzie Feidelson, New York Times, "Inside the High-Drama World of Youth Competition Dance," 21 Dec. 2017 Edwards is a graduate of the Baltimore School for the Arts and attended various workshops and intensives including Alvin Ailey, Dance Theatre of Harlem, Joffrey, Kirov and the New York City Ballet. Valerie Bonk, baltimoresun.com, "Ballet After Dark uses dance, meditation to heal emotional scars," 23 Aug. 2017 A member of the company for 12 years, she has been accepted into countless dance intensives over the years and this summer will study with the Milwaukee Ballet, the Kansas City Ballet and the Ballet Austin summer programs. David Laurell, Burbank Leader, "On the Town: From Sinatra to Madonna, student dancers channel the icons at Red Chair recital," 20 June 2017 These intensives are modern-day miniatures of the old C.M.S. experience. Giovanni Russonello, New York Times, "Creative Music Studio Changes Hands at a Critical Moment for Jazz," 26 June 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'intensive.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of intensive

Adjective

1604, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1813, in the meaning defined above

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about intensive

Statistics for intensive

Last Updated

9 Oct 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for intensive

The first known use of intensive was in 1604

See more words from the same year

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for intensive

intensive

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of intensive

: involving very great effort or work
grammar : giving force or emphasis to a statement
of farming : designed to increase production without using more land

intensive

adjective
in·​ten·​sive | \ in-ˈten-siv How to pronounce intensive (audio) \

Kids Definition of intensive

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : involving special effort or concentration intensive study
2 : giving emphasis The pronoun “myself” in “I myself did it” is intensive.

intensive

noun

Kids Definition of intensive (Entry 2 of 2)

: a word that emphasizes or stresses something “Quite” is an intensive in “quite a musician.”

intensive

adjective
in·​ten·​sive | \ in-ˈten(t)-siv How to pronounce intensive (audio) \

Medical Definition of intensive

: of, relating to, or marked by an extreme degree especially of dosage, duration, or frequency high-dose intensive chemotherapy intensive counseling for eating disorders

Other Words from intensive

intensively adverb
treat intensively

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on intensive

What made you want to look up intensive? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

to be made up of

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Where in the World? A Quiz

  • peter bruegel tower of babel painting
  • What language does pajama come from?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Dictionary Devil

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!