stoke

verb
\ˈstōk \
stoked; stoking

Definition of stoke 

transitive verb

1 : to poke or stir up (a fire, flames, etc.) : supply with fuel

2 : to feed abundantly

3 : to increase the activity, intensity, or amount of limiting the number of cars available … will help stoke demand for the car— Keith Naughton

intransitive verb

: to stir up or tend a fire (as in a furnace) : supply a furnace with fuel

Examples of stoke in a Sentence

The engineer stoked the coals. The new ad campaign has helped to stoke sales. Poor revenue figures have stoked concerns about possible layoffs.
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Recent Examples on the Web

While falling user growth is a risk for Twitter, so are fake accounts that often stoke disinformation and manipulation. Elizabeth Dwoskin, Washington Post, "Twitter’s stock takes a hit after report of fake account purge," 9 July 2018 Although falling user growth is a risk for Twitter, so are fake accounts that stoke disinformation and manipulation. Washington Post, latimes.com, "Twitter's stock slides after report of fake-account purge," 9 July 2018 Critics of the Democratic establishment say this is precisely the strain of dismissiveness that has stoked disenchantment among the party’s base. Nash Jenkins, Time, "How Democrats in Congress Responded to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's Surprise Win," 29 June 2018 The shooting massacre in February at a Florida high school has unleashed a plethora of what experts say are questionable statistics that stoke confusion regarding gun violence in America. Steve Kurtz, Fox News, "Experts shoot holes in CNN's report on school gun violence," 19 June 2018 The other major problem is that a century of fire suppression has loaded American forests with dense underbrush that stokes more intense fires. Jake Bullinger, Outside Online, "It's So Dry, Forests Across the Southwest Are Closing," 6 June 2018 The tool, which is also being tested in Canada, follows a scandal involving the political consultant Cambridge Analytica that has stoked concerns about privacy on the social network. BostonGlobe.com, "Subway to close about 500 more stores," 26 Apr. 2018 Apart from the campaign statements, Trump’s presidential tweets about the travel ban and last fall’s retweets of inflammatory videos that stoked anti-Islam sentiment all could feature in the court’s discussion of the travel ban’s legality. Mark Sherman, The Seattle Times, "Travel ban case is U.S. Supreme Court’s first dive into Trump policy," 23 Apr. 2018 So the regime stoked sectarian tensions to divide the opposition. The Economist, "How a victorious Bashar al-Assad is changing Syria," 28 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stoke.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stoke

1683, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for stoke

Dutch stoken; akin to Middle Dutch stuken to push

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Dictionary Entries near stoke

stoirin

stoit

stoiter

stoke

stoked

stokehold

stokehole

Statistics for stoke

Last Updated

11 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for stoke

The first known use of stoke was in 1683

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More Definitions for stoke

stoke

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stoke

: to stir or add fuel to (something that is burning)

: to increase the amount or strength of (something)

stoke

noun
\ˈstōk \

Medical Definition of stoke 

: the cgs unit of kinematic viscosity being that of a fluid which has a viscosity of one poise and a density of one gram per cubic centimeter

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a state of commotion or excitement

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