stare

verb
\ ˈster How to pronounce stare (audio) \
stared; staring

Definition of stare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to look fixedly often with wide-open eyes
2 : to show oneself conspicuously the error stared from the page
3 of hair : to stand on end : bristle also : to appear rough and lusterless

transitive verb

1 : to have an effect on by staring
2 : to look at with a searching or earnest gaze
stare one in the face
: to be undeniably and forcefully evident or apparent

stare

noun

Definition of stare (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act or an instance of staring a blank stare

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Other Words from stare

Verb

starer noun

Synonyms for stare

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of stare in a Sentence

Verb She stared out the window. His mother told him not to stare. Noun They looked at me with accusing stares. caught the child's wide-eyed stare on film
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb As the panicked sailors stare at the churning water, six of their number are snatched by the monster and swallowed up. Richard Galant, CNN, 13 June 2021 The glassy eyes appear to stare out as the skull sways back and forth on the operating table. Anton L. Delgado, The Arizona Republic, 29 May 2021 Monty Williams walked into the room and took a minute to stare at the NBA Finals backdrop. Dan Woike, Los Angeles Times, 6 July 2021 In the end, all Roberto Martinez could do at the Allianz Arena was to stare into the distance. Samindra Kunti, Forbes, 4 July 2021 After his final inning, Scherzer left the field staring down Girardi, who stepped from the dugout to stare back. John Shea, San Francisco Chronicle, 24 June 2021 During their first planting season, passersby—including a local sheriff—would pull over and get out of their cars to stare at the fields of plants, which look a lot like ones people used to try desperately to hide from public view. Lisa Gabor, Town & Country, 12 June 2021 Okay seriously… is there anything worse than having to stare at messy, disorganized cables and power cords all over your desk, kitchen counter, or elsewhere? Maren Estrada, BGR, 4 June 2021 It’s one thing to stare up at the sky in the middle of the wilderness. Outside Online, 18 May 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun With her bracingly angelic features and deep stare, Slick looks like Alice on LSD. Anna Russell, The New Yorker, 11 July 2021 Paige has the gift of an icy stare that Bravo puts to good use: The annoyance that Zola feels is palpable. Katie Walsh, Los Angeles Times, 29 June 2021 That stare might just be one of strong disapproval. Vivienne Walt, Fortune, 22 June 2021 Not only did the Open lose an off-court stare-down with one of the sport’s premier attractions, but — in an echo of Mickelson’s win — hardly anyone was paying much attention to what was happening on the court itself. New York Times, 16 June 2021 But in recent weeks, with the glory of pro football long behind him and living back at his family home in South Carolina, Adams had become more withdrawn, his warm and studious demeanor giving way to a blank stare. Megan Cassidy, San Francisco Chronicle, 11 Apr. 2021 Slowly, the loss of her son Kevin to suicide emerges into the plot, and Winslet’s thousand-mile vaping stare turns out to be just one manifestation of the pervasive guilt afflicting Easttown’s women. Jo Livingstone, The New Republic, 30 May 2021 McCracken especially has a razor stare that grounds the dreamy style. Leah Greenblatt, EW.com, 27 May 2021 In the days after, Nakajima rolled out new experiments: Photos of himself modified to look like a younger man, smiling at lunch or with a smoldering stare. Washington Post, 11 May 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stare.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stare

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1553, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for stare

Verb

Middle English, from Old English starian; akin to Old High German starēn to stare, Greek stereos solid, Lithuanian starinti to stiffen

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Time Traveler for stare

Time Traveler

The first known use of stare was before the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near stare

stardust

stare

stare at (someone)

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Statistics for stare

Last Updated

24 Jul 2021

Cite this Entry

“Stare.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stare. Accessed 28 Jul. 2021.

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More Definitions for stare

stare

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to look at someone or something for a long time often with your eyes wide open

stare

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stare (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of looking directly at someone or something for a long time : the act of staring

stare

verb
\ ˈster How to pronounce stare (audio) \
stared; staring

Kids Definition of stare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to look at hard and long often with wide-open eyes

stare

noun

Kids Definition of stare (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act or an instance of looking at hard and long

More from Merriam-Webster on stare

Nglish: Translation of stare for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of stare for Arabic Speakers

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