stare

verb
\ ˈster How to pronounce stare (audio) \
stared; staring

Definition of stare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to look fixedly often with wide-open eyes
2 : to show oneself conspicuously the error stared from the page
3 of hair : to stand on end : bristle also : to appear rough and lusterless

transitive verb

1 : to have an effect on by staring
2 : to look at with a searching or earnest gaze
stare one in the face
: to be undeniably and forcefully evident or apparent

stare

noun

Definition of stare (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act or an instance of staring a blank stare

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Other Words from stare

Verb

starer noun

Synonyms for stare

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of stare in a Sentence

Verb She stared out the window. His mother told him not to stare. Noun They looked at me with accusing stares. caught the child's wide-eyed stare on film
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Several defense witnesses also said that Prince would stare out of windows at his home and could be heard talking to himself as if having a two-way conversation. James Whitlow, baltimoresun.com, "Psychiatrist testifies that accused Advanced Granite shooter Radee Prince suffers from host of mental illnesses," 23 Oct. 2020 Ireland and Czechia have become the first European countries to re-enter national lockdown, as the second wave of the coronavirus pandemic begins to pummel the continent and small businesses stare bankruptcy in the face. David Meyer, Fortune, "National lockdowns return to Europe as COVID-19 numbers soar," 22 Oct. 2020 The obvious, stare-you-in-the-face problem is the difference between diet and not-diet. Tamar Haspel, Washington Post, "Why ‘moderation’ is the worst weight-loss advice ever," 21 Oct. 2020 Instead, people should directly face the cougar and not stare them directly in the eyes but at their feet, make loud noises and try to appear larger. Jessica Flores, USA TODAY, "'The cougar guy': Utah hiker encounters a cougar who followed him for nearly six minutes," 14 Oct. 2020 Most sit and stare, their eyes filled with nervous tension, confusion and worry. Joe Heim, Washington Post, "Pandemic teaching, in their words," 6 Oct. 2020 Lamar Jackson will stare at two possible versions of his financial future over the next two weekends as the Ravens play the Houston Texans and the Kansas City Chiefs. Childs Walker, baltimoresun.com, "How much is Lamar Jackson worth to Ravens? Deshaun Watson, Patrick Mahomes offer glimpse at financial future.," 19 Sep. 2020 Routes on the Northeast Regional train (which is slower, with more stops and more time to stare out the window) are also on sale, with fares for one-ways between New York City and Philadelphia costing just $28 per person when booking for two. Meredith Carey, Condé Nast Traveler, "Amtrak Trips Through New York, Boston, and D.C. Are on Sale," 21 Sep. 2020 The staff report also stresses that the camera systems are controlled by the Surfline company, not the subscribers, so viewers can’t redirect them to stare at sunbathers on the beach. Barbara Henry, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Encinitas approves request to add private surf cameras at Moonlight, Swami’s," 19 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun His stare into the dugout after Friday’s final out was a reminder of that objective, that even with the Dodgers still facing a 3-2 deficit in the series, their season isn’t finished. Jack Harris, Los Angeles Times, "Kenley Jansen on his steely stare toward Dodgers’ dugout: ‘It was: Let’s go’," 17 Oct. 2020 The way @KamalaHarris smiles while cutting throat during a debate is the equivalent of my moms death stare. NBC News, "Asian Twitter, Black Twitter joke about Harris' disapproving auntie vibe," 8 Oct. 2020 Such talk would surely provoke a death stare from Harbaugh, who spends every waking hour guarding against let-ups. Childs Walker, baltimoresun.com, "Five Things We Learned from the Ravens’ 31-17 win over the Washington Football Team," 5 Oct. 2020 Felicia, a 32-year-old with an intense stare, had traveled from her home in Orland, a small town 150 miles north of San Francisco. Gabriel Thompson, Longreads, "Inside the Chaos of Immigration Court," 23 Sep. 2020 But that didn't stop many — including Aniston — from giving fans stop-and-stare style moments. Brittany Talarico, PEOPLE.com, "Jennifer Aniston's Sexy Black Gown and Major Tan at the 2020 Emmys Prove Some Things Never Change," 20 Sep. 2020 The hard glare from Paul and the long stare from Harden, the former Rockets teammates who no longer get along, a few seconds from Paul’s new team forcing a Game 7 against his old one. Joe Freeman, oregonlive, "The NBA’s great awakening, redoing Trail Blazers’ worst trade, Nuggets-Jazz Game 7, thanking Chris Paul: NBA news and notes," 1 Sep. 2020 The woman slurred her words and had a blank stare on her face. Bob Sandrick, cleveland, "Man steals 79 bags of candy from Speedway; intoxicated woman found lying on ground: Berea police blotter," 28 Aug. 2020 Ginsburg’s trademark glasses, piercing stare and decorative collar appeared in tattoos, bumper stickers, tote bags, coffee mugs, Halloween costumes and music videos. Nora Mcgreevy, Smithsonian Magazine, "Nation Mourns Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Who Broke Barriers and Became a Feminist Icon," 19 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stare.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stare

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1553, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for stare

Verb

Middle English, from Old English starian; akin to Old High German starēn to stare, Greek stereos solid, Lithuanian starinti to stiffen

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Time Traveler for stare

Time Traveler

The first known use of stare was before the 12th century

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Statistics for stare

Last Updated

27 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Stare.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stare. Accessed 30 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for stare

stare

verb
How to pronounce stare (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of stare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to look at someone or something for a long time often with your eyes wide open

stare

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stare (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of looking directly at someone or something for a long time : the act of staring

stare

verb
\ ˈster How to pronounce stare (audio) \
stared; staring

Kids Definition of stare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to look at hard and long often with wide-open eyes

stare

noun

Kids Definition of stare (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act or an instance of looking at hard and long

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Comments on stare

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