snatch

verb
\ ˈsnach How to pronounce snatch (audio) \
snatched; snatching; snatches

Definition of snatch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to attempt to seize something suddenly

transitive verb

: to take or grasp abruptly or hastily snatch up a pen snatched the first opportunity also : to seize or take suddenly without permission, ceremony, or right snatched a kiss

snatch

noun

Definition of snatch (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a brief period caught snatches of sleep
b : a brief, fragmentary, or hurried part : bit caught snatches of the conversation
2a : a snatching at or of something
b slang : an act or instance of kidnapping
3 : a lift in weight lifting in which the weight is raised from the floor directly to an overhead position in a single motion — compare clean and jerk, press
4 vulgar : the female pudenda

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Other Words from snatch

Verb

snatcher noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for snatch

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for snatch

Verb

take, seize, grasp, clutch, snatch, grab mean to get hold of by or as if by catching up with the hand. take is a general term applicable to any manner of getting something into one's possession or control. take some salad from the bowl seize implies a sudden and forcible movement in getting hold of something tangible or an apprehending of something fleeting or elusive when intangible. seized the suspect grasp stresses a laying hold so as to have firmly in possession. grasp the handle and pull clutch suggests avidity or anxiety in seizing or grasping and may imply less success in holding. clutching her purse snatch suggests more suddenness or quickness but less force than seize. snatched a doughnut and ran grab implies more roughness or rudeness than snatch. grabbed roughly by the arm

Examples of snatch in a Sentence

Verb An eagle swooped down and snatched one of the hens. She snatched the toy from his hands. Noun to the police chief, it didn't look like a snatch, but another case of a bride-to-be getting cold feet
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Furthermore, keep developing your range of offers to snatch a larger share of the market. Valery Kurilov, Forbes, 24 May 2021 In addition, Branch will take official visits to Alabama and Clemson — two dark horses that could make a last-minute push to snatch the No. 1 player from Nevada. Kyle Kelly, cleveland, 23 Apr. 2021 Though Farley is coming off recent back surgery, this could be a unique opportunity to snatch a player who's arguably this draft's top defensive back while giving him sufficient time to recover while this club resets under new coach Rob Saleh. Nate Davis, USA TODAY, 19 Apr. 2021 According to the Mortgage Bankers’ Association, 2.5 million mortgages, or 5.1% of all outstanding residential loans, also are still in forbearance, as wealthy buyers continue to snatch up second and third homes (or more) as investments. Peter Lane Taylor, Forbes, 18 Apr. 2021 Of course, in the case of PS5, the situation has not been helped by an army of scalpers and their bots which have been able to snatch up stock from retailers whenever new units go live. Paul Tassi, Forbes, 11 May 2021 Economic imperatives have destroyed so much of the natural world, and events like the Covid-19 pandemic will only become more likely as human populations and desires grow and snatch more from the biosphere. Chandran Nair, CNN, 30 Apr. 2021 Fischer resisted when the men tried to snatch the dogs and was shot in the chest. Kevin Rector, Los Angeles Times, 29 Apr. 2021 And though fans of cute baby animals might object, the film captures fascinating footage of an old matriarch teaching a new generation of orcas how to snatch a lion seal pup from off a beach. BostonGlobe.com, 15 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun While there hasn’t been a particular rash of private sales scams in the city lately, Bosques recalled a case the FBI cracked with the help of a Fremont detective who was investigating a snatch-and-grab robbery at a coffee shop in 2012. Joseph Geha, The Mercury News, 8 June 2017 The text, sung by two sopranos, may well have been in Esperanto, as only snatches were decipherable. Alan G. Artner, chicagotribune.com, 4 June 2017 The beat is now peppy with drum and snatches of piano, a common Beatles rhythm. Nicholas Dawidoff, The Atlantic, 18 May 2017 Some were able to hear snatches of melody as subtle as the scraping together of grass-blades or the throbbing of the brittle tissue of insects. Ben Lerner, The New Yorker, 29 Mar. 2017 The accidental comedy of some of the conversations even led the program BBC Newsnight to dramatize snatches of dialogue, with the voices of both the American president and the British prime minister played by the impressionist Rory Bremner. Robert Mackey, New York Times, 8 Jan. 2016

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'snatch.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of snatch

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Noun

1563, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for snatch

Verb

Middle English snacchen to snap, seize; akin to Middle Dutch snacken to snap at

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Time Traveler for snatch

Time Traveler

The first known use of snatch was in the 13th century

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Statistics for snatch

Last Updated

12 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Snatch.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/snatch. Accessed 15 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for snatch

snatch

verb

English Language Learners Definition of snatch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to take (something) quickly or eagerly
: to take (something or someone) suddenly from a person or place often by using force

snatch

noun

English Language Learners Definition of snatch (Entry 2 of 2)

: a small part of something

snatch

verb
\ ˈsnach How to pronounce snatch (audio) \
snatched; snatching

Kids Definition of snatch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to take hold of or try to take hold of something quickly or suddenly … he snatched up his towel. "I'm leaving," he called down the beach.— Virginia Hamilton, M. C. Higgins

snatch

noun

Kids Definition of snatch (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : something brief, hurried, or in small bits snatches of old songs
2 : an act of taking hold of something quickly
3 : a brief period I slept in snatches.

More from Merriam-Webster on snatch

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for snatch

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about snatch

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