snatch

verb
\ ˈsnach \
snatched; snatching; snatches

Definition of snatch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to attempt to seize something suddenly

transitive verb

: to take or grasp abruptly or hastily snatch up a pen snatched the first opportunity also : to seize or take suddenly without permission, ceremony, or right snatched a kiss

snatch

noun

Definition of snatch (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a brief period caught snatches of sleep
b : a brief, fragmentary, or hurried part : bit caught snatches of the conversation
2a : a snatching at or of something
b slang : an act or instance of kidnapping
3 : a lift in weight lifting in which the weight is raised from the floor directly to an overhead position in a single motion — compare clean and jerk, press
4 vulgar : the female pudenda

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Other Words from snatch

Verb

snatcher noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for snatch

Synonyms: Verb

bag, capture, catch, collar, cop [slang], corral, get, glom, grab, grapple, hook, land, nab, nail, net, nobble [British slang], rap, seize, snag, snap (up), snare, trap

Synonyms: Noun

abduction, hijacking (also highjacking), kidnapping (also kidnaping), rape

Antonyms: Verb

miss

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Choose the Right Synonym for snatch

Verb

take, seize, grasp, clutch, snatch, grab mean to get hold of by or as if by catching up with the hand. take is a general term applicable to any manner of getting something into one's possession or control. take some salad from the bowl seize implies a sudden and forcible movement in getting hold of something tangible or an apprehending of something fleeting or elusive when intangible. seized the suspect grasp stresses a laying hold so as to have firmly in possession. grasp the handle and pull clutch suggests avidity or anxiety in seizing or grasping and may imply less success in holding. clutching her purse snatch suggests more suddenness or quickness but less force than seize. snatched a doughnut and ran grab implies more roughness or rudeness than snatch. grabbed roughly by the arm

Examples of snatch in a Sentence

Verb

An eagle swooped down and snatched one of the hens. She snatched the toy from his hands.

Noun

to the police chief, it didn't look like a snatch, but another case of a bride-to-be getting cold feet
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Ho-Fung Hung, a sociologist and China expert at Johns Hopkins University, said that if Mr. Meng has been detained, then international organizations are likely to be alarmed that their senior Chinese staff could be snatched away without notice. Eva Dou, WSJ, "Interpol’s Chinese President Reported Missing in China," 5 Oct. 2018 With less than two minutes remaining, Lyme-Old Lyme scored two goals in 12 seconds to come from behind and snatch away the rivalry game, 9-8. Joe Burns, courant.com, "Lacrosse Notebook: Canton's Defense Steps Up In Key Early Season Win Over Granby," 19 Apr. 2018 And when Demi's the first to snatch Colton at the after-party, Tracy is shooketh. Amanda Mitchell, Marie Claire, "Please, Please Let Megan Mullally and Nick Offerman Host the Next Season of 'The Bachelor'," 15 Jan. 2019 But Porter didn't need to flip and twirl his cape to snatch wigs. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Billy Porter's Golden Globes Look Just Changed My Life," 7 Jan. 2019 Plenty of eyebrows were raised last year when the Florida Panthers left forward Jonathan Marchessault unprotected in the NHL expansion draft for the Vegas Golden Knights to snatch up. Geoff Baker, The Seattle Times, "Seattle’s NHL team will get same favorable expansion draft rules as Vegas Golden Knights. What happens next is anyone’s guess.," 5 Dec. 2018 Soviet space strategists even suspected that the Space Shuttle, which began development in 1971, would be able to snatch their secret satellites from orbit and even carry them back to Earth inside its huge cargo bay. Anatoly Zak, Popular Mechanics, "The Soviet Laser Space Pistol, Revealed," 14 June 2018 Whoever does snatch it up, a team is already in place to build out the Wall House (and make small cosmetic updates to the Alice Ball House), with Bakh’s firm handling project management and quality control for the whole process. Jenny Xie, Curbed, "‘Livable version’ of Philip Johnson’s Glass House hits the market," 13 Sep. 2018 Then the Storm would score nine straight to take the lead, only to watch Phoenix snatch it back. Matt Calkins, The Seattle Times, "One for the ages: Storm gets crown jewel in classic WNBA semifinals victory over Phoenix," 4 Sep. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

While there hasn’t been a particular rash of private sales scams in the city lately, Bosques recalled a case the FBI cracked with the help of a Fremont detective who was investigating a snatch-and-grab robbery at a coffee shop in 2012. Joseph Geha, The Mercury News, "Fremont: ‘Exchange zone’ set up for Craigslist buyers, sellers," 8 June 2017 The text, sung by two sopranos, may well have been in Esperanto, as only snatches were decipherable. Alan G. Artner, chicagotribune.com, "Dal Niente's 'Party 2017' pushes music off-focus," 4 June 2017 The beat is now peppy with drum and snatches of piano, a common Beatles rhythm. Nicholas Dawidoff, The Atlantic, "How the Beatles Wrote ‘A Day in the Life’," 18 May 2017 Some were able to hear snatches of melody as subtle as the scraping together of grass-blades or the throbbing of the brittle tissue of insects. Ben Lerner, The New Yorker, "A Strange Australian Masterpiece," 29 Mar. 2017 The accidental comedy of some of the conversations even led the program BBC Newsnight to dramatize snatches of dialogue, with the voices of both the American president and the British prime minister played by the impressionist Rory Bremner. Robert Mackey, New York Times, "Excerpts From Imagined Clinton-Blair Chats, Intended as Satire, Cause Confusion," 8 Jan. 2016

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'snatch.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of snatch

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Noun

1563, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for snatch

Verb

Middle English snacchen to snap, seize; akin to Middle Dutch snacken to snap at

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Learn More about snatch

Dictionary Entries near snatch

snarl up

snash

snaste

snatch

snatchable

snatch at

snatch block

Statistics for snatch

Last Updated

8 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for snatch

The first known use of snatch was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for snatch

snatch

verb

English Language Learners Definition of snatch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to take (something) quickly or eagerly
: to take (something or someone) suddenly from a person or place often by using force

snatch

noun

English Language Learners Definition of snatch (Entry 2 of 2)

: a small part of something

snatch

verb
\ ˈsnach \
snatched; snatching

Kids Definition of snatch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to take hold of or try to take hold of something quickly or suddenly … he snatched up his towel. “I'm leaving,” he called down the beach.— Virginia Hamilton, M. C. Higgins

snatch

noun

Kids Definition of snatch (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : something brief, hurried, or in small bits snatches of old songs
2 : an act of taking hold of something quickly
3 : a brief period I slept in snatches.

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More from Merriam-Webster on snatch

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with snatch

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for snatch

Spanish Central: Translation of snatch

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about snatch

Comments on snatch

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