snatch

verb
\ˈsnach \
snatched; snatching; snatches

Definition of snatch 

(Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to attempt to seize something suddenly

transitive verb

: to take or grasp abruptly or hastily snatch up a pen snatched the first opportunity also : to seize or take suddenly without permission, ceremony, or right snatched a kiss

snatch

noun

Definition of snatch (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a brief period caught snatches of sleep

b : a brief, fragmentary, or hurried part : bit caught snatches of the conversation

2a : a snatching at or of something

b slang : an act or instance of kidnapping

3 : a lift in weight lifting in which the weight is raised from the floor directly to an overhead position in a single motion — compare clean and jerk, press

4 vulgar : the female pudenda

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Other Words from snatch

Verb

snatcher noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for snatch

Synonyms: Verb

bag, capture, catch, collar, cop [slang], corral, get, glom, grab, grapple, hook, land, nab, nail, net, rap, seize, snag, snap (up), snare, trap

Antonyms: Verb

miss

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Choose the Right Synonym for snatch

Verb

take, seize, grasp, clutch, snatch, grab mean to get hold of by or as if by catching up with the hand. take is a general term applicable to any manner of getting something into one's possession or control. take some salad from the bowl seize implies a sudden and forcible movement in getting hold of something tangible or an apprehending of something fleeting or elusive when intangible. seized the suspect grasp stresses a laying hold so as to have firmly in possession. grasp the handle and pull clutch suggests avidity or anxiety in seizing or grasping and may imply less success in holding. clutching her purse snatch suggests more suddenness or quickness but less force than seize. snatched a doughnut and ran grab implies more roughness or rudeness than snatch. grabbed roughly by the arm

Examples of snatch in a Sentence

Verb

An eagle swooped down and snatched one of the hens. She snatched the toy from his hands.

Noun

to the police chief, it didn't look like a snatch, but another case of a bride-to-be getting cold feet
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

In the Best Guest Actress in a Drama Series category, Viola Davis snatched a nomination for her part in that Scandal/HTGAWM crossover episode, and Samira Wiley joins her for her role as Moira in Handmaids Tale. refinery29.com, "Issa Rae Finally Got An Emmy Nod & I Can't Stop Crying," 12 July 2018 Pachuca snatched the lead back for good at 2-1 a few minutes later on a strike from Franco Jara. Ben Steele, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "C.F. Pachuca beats Club Leon in third-ever friendly at Miller Park," 11 July 2018 Jace’s mom snatched Ramos’ phone from his hands, and called police. Chris Harris, PEOPLE.com, "Calif. Toddler Kills Himself with Gun — and Owner Playing Video Games in Other Room Is Charged," 11 July 2018 One snatched the wailing boy from her arms, strangled him, and threw his lifeless body to the ground. Washington Post, "Silent pain: Rohingya rape survivors’ babies quietly emerge," 5 July 2018 And if the bill is doomed to fail, the leadership often just snatches a bill off the floor. Chad Pergram, Fox News, "Trump amplifying calls to ditch the legislative filibuster as midterms near," 4 July 2018 Courtois snatched a corner kick out of the air with 93:30 on the clock. Tariq Panja, New York Times, "World Cup 2018: Belgium Shocks Japan With Stunning Rally," 4 July 2018 News reports of weeping children snatched from their mothers and fathers led to wide criticism of the administration by church groups, politicians and children’s advocates. Jeff Gammage, Philly.com, "In Philly, Sen. Casey demands Trump administration produce plan to reunite separated families," 25 June 2018 Like a catfish trolling the bottom of the riverbed for food, Winnie snatched any morsel that fell on the floor. Lauren Palmer, Curbed, "When a dog is not just part of the family, but part of the house," 15 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

While there hasn’t been a particular rash of private sales scams in the city lately, Bosques recalled a case the FBI cracked with the help of a Fremont detective who was investigating a snatch-and-grab robbery at a coffee shop in 2012. Joseph Geha, The Mercury News, "Fremont: ‘Exchange zone’ set up for Craigslist buyers, sellers," 8 June 2017 The text, sung by two sopranos, may well have been in Esperanto, as only snatches were decipherable. Alan G. Artner, chicagotribune.com, "Dal Niente's 'Party 2017' pushes music off-focus," 4 June 2017 The beat is now peppy with drum and snatches of piano, a common Beatles rhythm. Nicholas Dawidoff, The Atlantic, "How the Beatles Wrote ‘A Day in the Life’," 18 May 2017 Some were able to hear snatches of melody as subtle as the scraping together of grass-blades or the throbbing of the brittle tissue of insects. Ben Lerner, The New Yorker, "A Strange Australian Masterpiece," 29 Mar. 2017 The accidental comedy of some of the conversations even led the program BBC Newsnight to dramatize snatches of dialogue, with the voices of both the American president and the British prime minister played by the impressionist Rory Bremner. Robert Mackey, New York Times, "Excerpts From Imagined Clinton-Blair Chats, Intended as Satire, Cause Confusion," 8 Jan. 2016

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'snatch.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of snatch

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Noun

1563, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for snatch

Verb

Middle English snacchen to snap, seize; akin to Middle Dutch snacken to snap at

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Learn More about snatch

Dictionary Entries near snatch

snarl up

snash

snaste

snatch

snatchable

snatch at

snatch block

Phrases Related to snatch

in snatches

snatch at

Statistics for snatch

Last Updated

4 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for snatch

The first known use of snatch was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for snatch

snatch

verb

English Language Learners Definition of snatch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to take (something) quickly or eagerly

: to take (something or someone) suddenly from a person or place often by using force

snatch

noun

English Language Learners Definition of snatch (Entry 2 of 2)

: a small part of something

snatch

verb
\ˈsnach \
snatched; snatching

Kids Definition of snatch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to take hold of or try to take hold of something quickly or suddenly … he snatched up his towel. “I'm leaving,” he called down the beach.— Virginia Hamilton, M. C. Higgins

snatch

noun

Kids Definition of snatch (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : something brief, hurried, or in small bits snatches of old songs

2 : an act of taking hold of something quickly

3 : a brief period I slept in snatches.

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More from Merriam-Webster on snatch

See words that rhyme with snatch

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for snatch

Spanish Central: Translation of snatch

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about snatch

Comments on snatch

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