snatch

verb
\ ˈsnach How to pronounce snatch (audio) \
snatched; snatching; snatches

Definition of snatch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to attempt to seize something suddenly

transitive verb

: to take or grasp abruptly or hastily snatch up a pen snatched the first opportunity also : to seize or take suddenly without permission, ceremony, or right snatched a kiss

snatch

noun

Definition of snatch (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a brief period caught snatches of sleep
b : a brief, fragmentary, or hurried part : bit caught snatches of the conversation
2a : a snatching at or of something
b slang : an act or instance of kidnapping
3 : a lift in weight lifting in which the weight is raised from the floor directly to an overhead position in a single motion — compare clean and jerk, press
4 vulgar : the female pudenda

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Other Words from snatch

Verb

snatcher noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for snatch

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for snatch

Verb

take, seize, grasp, clutch, snatch, grab mean to get hold of by or as if by catching up with the hand. take is a general term applicable to any manner of getting something into one's possession or control. take some salad from the bowl seize implies a sudden and forcible movement in getting hold of something tangible or an apprehending of something fleeting or elusive when intangible. seized the suspect grasp stresses a laying hold so as to have firmly in possession. grasp the handle and pull clutch suggests avidity or anxiety in seizing or grasping and may imply less success in holding. clutching her purse snatch suggests more suddenness or quickness but less force than seize. snatched a doughnut and ran grab implies more roughness or rudeness than snatch. grabbed roughly by the arm

Examples of snatch in a Sentence

Verb An eagle swooped down and snatched one of the hens. She snatched the toy from his hands. Noun to the police chief, it didn't look like a snatch, but another case of a bride-to-be getting cold feet
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb But, in the most dramatic way possible, Edin Dzeko and then Sergio Aguero both astonishingly found the net in stoppage time to snatch victory from the jaws of defeat. Ben Morse And Don Riddell, CNN, "How Shaun Wright-Phillips wanted both teams to win when Manchester City won the Premier League," 4 Dec. 2019 Book on Southwest's Cyber Monday deals page to snatch up the last of these low fares. Jessica Puckett, Condé Nast Traveler, "14 Flight, Hotel, and Cruise Deals Worth Booking on Travel Deals Tuesday," 3 Dec. 2019 The deal runs through December 3, which means there's no better time to snatch up a pair of the brand's best-selling all-white Royale Blanco or millennial pink Royale Perforated. Staff, CNN Underscored, "Cyber Monday 2019: 100+ of the best deals you can start shopping now," 1 Dec. 2019 The win puts the hometown team back in prime position to snatch their fourth division crown since 2015. Jordan Ray, Houston Chronicle, "Memes shred Colts, praise Texans for win on 'Thursday Night Football'," 21 Nov. 2019 Or Thomas Kurian, who runs Google’s cloud division and might be happy to snatch some business from Amazon? Owen Thomas, SFChronicle.com, "PG&E is blacking out the Bay Area. Can Silicon Valley help?," 16 Oct. 2019 Video broadcast on Hong Kong television also showed a masked, black-clad protester dropping a riot officer with a flying high kick, followed by two other protesters who beat the officer on the ground and tried unsuccessfully to snatch his gun. John Leicester, San Diego Union-Tribune, "‘Be water’: Police swoop as Hong Kong protests shift tactics," 13 Oct. 2019 His dynamic late-game scoring play put the Blue Devils in position to snatch an upset victory. Staff Reports, courant.com, "Regional Digest: Manchester runners finish strong at New Hampshire cross country meet," 23 Sep. 2019 The machine, about the size of compact car, used mechanical lifts to snatch a spike from the ground every three seconds. Robert Scheer, Indianapolis Star, "Tearing up the tracks: Railroad removal begins on Nickel Plate Line in Fishers," 21 Aug. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun While there hasn’t been a particular rash of private sales scams in the city lately, Bosques recalled a case the FBI cracked with the help of a Fremont detective who was investigating a snatch-and-grab robbery at a coffee shop in 2012. Joseph Geha, The Mercury News, "Fremont: ‘Exchange zone’ set up for Craigslist buyers, sellers," 8 June 2017 The text, sung by two sopranos, may well have been in Esperanto, as only snatches were decipherable. Alan G. Artner, chicagotribune.com, "Dal Niente's 'Party 2017' pushes music off-focus," 4 June 2017 The beat is now peppy with drum and snatches of piano, a common Beatles rhythm. Nicholas Dawidoff, The Atlantic, "How the Beatles Wrote ‘A Day in the Life’," 18 May 2017 Some were able to hear snatches of melody as subtle as the scraping together of grass-blades or the throbbing of the brittle tissue of insects. Ben Lerner, The New Yorker, "A Strange Australian Masterpiece," 29 Mar. 2017 The accidental comedy of some of the conversations even led the program BBC Newsnight to dramatize snatches of dialogue, with the voices of both the American president and the British prime minister played by the impressionist Rory Bremner. Robert Mackey, New York Times, "Excerpts From Imagined Clinton-Blair Chats, Intended as Satire, Cause Confusion," 8 Jan. 2016

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'snatch.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of snatch

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Noun

1563, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for snatch

Verb

Middle English snacchen to snap, seize; akin to Middle Dutch snacken to snap at

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Time Traveler for snatch

Time Traveler

The first known use of snatch was in the 13th century

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Statistics for snatch

Last Updated

13 Dec 2019

Cite this Entry

“Snatch.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/snatches. Accessed 13 December 2019.

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More Definitions for snatch

snatch

verb
How to pronounce snatch (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of snatch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to take (something) quickly or eagerly
: to take (something or someone) suddenly from a person or place often by using force

snatch

noun

English Language Learners Definition of snatch (Entry 2 of 2)

: a small part of something

snatch

verb
\ ˈsnach How to pronounce snatch (audio) \
snatched; snatching

Kids Definition of snatch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to take hold of or try to take hold of something quickly or suddenly … he snatched up his towel. “I'm leaving,” he called down the beach.— Virginia Hamilton, M. C. Higgins

snatch

noun

Kids Definition of snatch (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : something brief, hurried, or in small bits snatches of old songs
2 : an act of taking hold of something quickly
3 : a brief period I slept in snatches.

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More from Merriam-Webster on snatch

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for snatch

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with snatch

Spanish Central: Translation of snatch

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about snatch

Comments on snatch

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