slog

verb
\ ˈsläg How to pronounce slog (audio) \
slogged; slogging

Definition of slog

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to hit hard : beat
2 : to plod (one's way) perseveringly especially against difficulty

intransitive verb

1 : to plod heavily : tramp slogged through the snow
2 : to work hard and steadily : plug

slog

noun

Definition of slog (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : hard persistent work the endless enervating slog of war— Michael Gorra
b : a prolonged arduous task or effort reform will be a hard political slog— M. S. Forbes
2 : a hard dogged march or journey

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Other Words from slog

Verb

slogger noun

Examples of slog in a Sentence

Verb He slogged away at the paperwork all day. She slogged through her work. She slogged her way through her work. We've been slogging along for hours. He slogged through the deep snow. They slogged their way through the snow. Noun It will be a long, hard slog before everything is back to normal. It was a long slog up the mountain.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The flip side is the Bears could continue to slog their way through the season on offense, and in that situation, where would that leave Nagy? Brad Biggs, chicagotribune.com, "Column: The Chicago Bears offense is in a slump. But coach Matt Nagy is unlikely to give up play-calling duties — he still would be the one taking the heat.," 31 Oct. 2020 Being the lead running back, the one who occasionally has to slog through times when gaining 2 yards feels like accomplishment, often can be harder. Kent Somers, The Arizona Republic, "The Cardinals and their running game need more Chase Edmonds," 12 Oct. 2020 Crisp pacing condensed what had been a three-hour-plus nightly slog into a tighter two hours. Joe Garofoli, SFChronicle.com, "Takeaways from Democratic National Convention: Big tent, good TV, light on policy," 20 Aug. 2020 Three of the books were fairly good (one was really great), but one was really hard to slog through. The Washington Post, "Carolyn Hax Live (August 14)," 14 Aug. 2020 Emergency workers had to slog through heavy mud to retrieve bodies by wrapping them in the plastic sheets, which were then hung on crossed wooden poles shouldered by the recovery teams. BostonGlobe.com, "Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills at least 162 people," 2 July 2020 Yet the sense of fatigue for those fortunate enough to slog away from their home offices, bedrooms or kitchens is real. CBS News, "Half of Americans burned out on working from home," 24 June 2020 In the room next door, another judge hired to slog through the backlog of cases moved through an additional five cases per hour. Marina Starleaf Riker, ExpressNews.com, "Bexar County courts hold eviction court once again," 15 June 2020 The Ugashik is a muddy world, where fishermen slog through knee-deep muck to secure nets along the edge of the river at low tide. Miranda Weiss, Wired, "In Alaska, Summer's Getting Too Hot for the Salmon Run," 13 June 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Now, Phelan, the presumptive speaker of the House, faces a long slog as the Legislature takes on the state’s myriad challenges in his first session in charge. James Barragán, Dallas News, "Presumptive Texas House Speaker Dade Phelan will face choppy waters in difficult legislative session," 16 Nov. 2020 But the reaction to the election in financial markets in recent days suggests that something like the Obama recovery is more likely: in short, a long slog back to health. Neil Irwin, New York Times, "Why the Biden Economy Could Be the Same Long Slog as the Obama Economy," 8 Nov. 2020 But job growth has slowed steadily since June and recouping the rest of the lost jobs is likely to be a tougher slog, economists say. Paul Davidson, USA TODAY, "Economy grew at record 33.1% pace in Q3 as more businesses reopened after COVID-19 shutdowns," 29 Oct. 2020 The cast is terrific, the writing is sharp, and the story is compelling and expertly paced, and there are enough sparks of bleak humor to keep the series from being a slog. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "Review: Utopia is a very good series released at exactly the wrong time," 14 Oct. 2020 Hiring gains slowed sharply heading into the fall as more layoffs turned permanent, adding to signs that the economy faces a long slog to fully recover from the coronavirus pandemic. Harriet Torry And Anthony Debarros, WSJ, "WSJ Survey: 43% of Economists Don’t See U.S. Gaining Back Lost Jobs Until 2023," 8 Oct. 2020 Needless to say, the conditions made the game a slog for both Salt Lake and Sporting. Alex Vejar, The Salt Lake Tribune, "Three Points: Frightful weather for RSL, saying goodbye to Onuoha, and a look at the team awards," 9 Nov. 2020 But as the electoral prize of Florida appeared to slip out of reach, Biden and his aides settled in for a long slog, with aides pointing to silver linings and bracing for an extended wait as results are slowly reported in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Anchorage Daily News, "Key states are still too close to call as election results may take days," 4 Nov. 2020 As election officials proceed with the long, slow slog of vote counting, the Trump campaign continued to make false claims about the validity of votes counted. Evan Halper, Los Angeles Times, "Biden wins Wisconsin, Michigan as focus shifts to Pennsylvania, Nevada," 4 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'slog.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of slog

Verb

1824, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1888, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for slog

Verb

origin unknown

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Learn More about slog

Statistics for slog

Last Updated

12 Nov 2020

Cite this Entry

“Slog.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/slog. Accessed 5 Dec. 2020.

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More Definitions for slog

slog

verb
How to pronounce slog (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of slog

 (Entry 1 of 2)

informal
: to keep doing something even though it is difficult or boring : to work at something in a steady, determined way
: to walk slowly usually with heavy steps

slog

noun

English Language Learners Definition of slog (Entry 2 of 2)

informal
: a long period of hard work or effort
: a long, difficult walk

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Comments on slog

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