slog

verb
\ ˈsläg How to pronounce slog (audio) \
slogged; slogging

Definition of slog

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to hit hard : beat
2 : to plod (one's way) perseveringly especially against difficulty

intransitive verb

1 : to plod heavily : tramp slogged through the snow
2 : to work hard and steadily : plug

slog

noun

Definition of slog (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : hard persistent work the endless enervating slog of war— Michael Gorra
b : a prolonged arduous task or effort reform will be a hard political slog— M. S. Forbes
2 : a hard dogged march or journey

Other Words from slog

Verb

slogger noun

Examples of slog in a Sentence

Verb He slogged away at the paperwork all day. She slogged through her work. She slogged her way through her work. We've been slogging along for hours. He slogged through the deep snow. They slogged their way through the snow. Noun It will be a long, hard slog before everything is back to normal. It was a long slog up the mountain. See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Still, for the many of us, like myself, who slog through days and months filled with unbearable sadness or destabilizing mood disorders, the lack of a thoroughgoing solution is in itself despair-inducing. Daphne Merkin, The Atlantic, 10 July 2022 The film is positively loaded with scenes that should have a little more breathing room (in a couple instances, cuts happened immediately following important lines, as though Elvis couldn’t be bothered to slog through them). Jeff Ewing, Forbes, 24 June 2022 The trade-offs are even worse for super-commuters; in the US, roughly 10% of Americans slog through commutes of an hour or more each way. Sarah Todd, Quartz, 9 June 2022 Because most flu vaccines need about six months to slog through the production pipeline, vaccine strains are selected at the end of winter and injected into arms the next fall. Katherine J. Wu, The Atlantic, 24 Feb. 2022 Now visitors enter through the Sainsbury Wing and slog up the stairs to the Italian Renaissance rooms or down, down, down as deep as the deepest tube station to the temporary exhibition galleries. Brian T. Allen, National Review, 17 Feb. 2022 Some clematis literally jump out of the ground the spring after they are planted whereas others slog along, taking several years to gear up. oregonlive, 23 Jan. 2022 As with most negotiations, this one has the potential to slog on until close to Opening Day, by which time some casual fans will have lost interest. Paul Daugherty, The Enquirer, 1 Dec. 2021 Faced with flagging support as the U.S. continues to slog through a pandemic and rising inflation, the president has treated infrastructure as proof that government can function again. Josh Boak, Anchorage Daily News, 15 Nov. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun But the slog of those negotiations is certain to mean new worries from Democrats that time is slipping to strike a compromise. BostonGlobe.com, 21 May 2021 Among hospitals and at the CDC, there’s no confidence that this episode of superbug resurgence has ended, though the Covid pandemic has morphed from a full-on emergency into a wearying slog. Wired, 15 July 2022 And yet, Grant Gee's documentary about the brain-muddying slog that was Radiohead's worldwide press gauntlet after the monster success of OK Computer makes the most convincing case yet that being a rock star isn't all it's cracked up to be. Dennis Perkins, EW.com, 13 July 2022 With a 3-year-old who tumbles through life in a semiconscious dream state, getting anywhere in a city by foot is often a miserable slog spent snatching hands and barking orders. Stephanie H. Murray, The Atlantic, 7 July 2022 He was stunned, even proud that the winter slog would take only two weeks more than his springtime hike in 2019. Outside Online, 6 July 2022 Despite the promotional benefits of featuring star-producer Chris Pratt as a grittier kind of avenger, this brutal eight-episode slog squanders its talent in front of and behind the camera. Brian Lowry, CNN, 1 July 2022 The shape of this year’s mayoral election season looks very different from years past, with a 22-week slog between June 7 and Nov. 8. Julia Wickstaff Writer, Los Angeles Times, 25 June 2022 Instead of celebrating a heroic rebuff of Russia, Biden and his fellow leaders will be wrestling with how to manage a slog. Ashley Parker, Washington Post, 24 June 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'slog.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of slog

Verb

1824, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1888, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for slog

Verb

origin unknown

Learn More About slog

Dictionary Entries Near slog

sloe gin

slog

slogan

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for slog

Last Updated

28 Jul 2022

Cite this Entry

“Slog.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/slog. Accessed 8 Aug. 2022.

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More from Merriam-Webster on slog

Nglish: Translation of slog for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of slog for Arabic Speakers

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