slander

verb
slan·​der | \ ˈslan-dər How to pronounce slander (audio) \
slandered; slandering\ ˈslan-​d(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce slander (audio) \

Definition of slander

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

: to utter slander against : defame

slander

noun

Definition of slander (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the utterance of false charges or misrepresentations which defame and damage another's reputation
2 : a false and defamatory oral statement about a person — compare libel

Other Words from slander

Verb

slanderer \ ˈslan-​dər-​ər How to pronounce slander (audio) \ noun

Noun

slanderous \ ˈslan-​d(ə-​)rəs How to pronounce slander (audio) \ adjective
slanderously adverb
slanderousness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for slander

Verb

malign, traduce, asperse, vilify, calumniate, defame, slander mean to injure by speaking ill of. malign suggests specific and often subtle misrepresentation but may not always imply deliberate lying. the most maligned monarch in British history traduce stresses the resulting ignominy and distress to the victim. so traduced the governor that he was driven from office asperse implies continued attack on a reputation often by indirect or insinuated detraction. both candidates aspersed the other's motives vilify implies attempting to destroy a reputation by open and direct abuse. no criminal was more vilified in the press calumniate imputes malice to the speaker and falsity to the assertions. falsely calumniated as a traitor defame stresses the actual loss of or injury to one's good name. sued them for defaming her reputation slander stresses the suffering of the victim. town gossips slandered their good name

Examples of slander in a Sentence

Verb She was accused of slandering her former boss. Noun She is being sued for slander. He was a target of slander. We've heard countless unsupported slanders about her.
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Or a person who knows how fast rumors spread on social media and decides not to slander someone on Facebook or Twitter or TikTok, whatever that is. Beth Thames | Bethmthames@gmail.com, al, 27 Apr. 2022 In attempting to slander her, Republican senators may also have done damage in the broader area of criminal-justice reform, dismissing all notions of judicial discretion and proportionality, let alone rehabilitation. Amy Davidson Sorkin, The New Yorker, 9 Apr. 2022 And the same pundits and politicians who have spent two years attempting to ostracize and slander anyone who opposed their mandates are now deeply upset by some gentle prodding. David Harsanyi, National Review, 3 Mar. 2022 But Kalb wasn’t the only cheftestant to slander queso’s good name. Lauren Mcdowell, Chron, 10 Mar. 2022 And for most of that time Americans have subjected the birds to slander, torture, and mass slaughter. Nathaniel Rich, The Atlantic, 15 Feb. 2022 University officials slander their own tenured professors for expressing ideas most Americans call common sense. Myles Mcknight, National Review, 13 Feb. 2022 What a great gig, getting millions of dollars each week to lie about, bash and slander Democrats, liberals, progressives, leftists and anyone who exposes your grift without fear of any repercussion. Ed Stockly, Los Angeles Times, 22 Nov. 2021 ULPs can remain tied up in court for years while unions use fabricated charges and technicalities to slander employers, aid organizing campaigns or force voluntary recognition. WSJ, 21 Sep. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In 2016 -- before he was elected to the County Commission -- Eaton was one of four community activists the landfill’s previous owners sued for libel and slander, seeking $30 million in damages. Dennis Pillion | Dpillion@al.com, al, 13 Jan. 2022 According to WalletHub, umbrella insurance also covers a wide range of scenarios such as libel and slander, false arrest, personal psychological harm and mental anguish, and malicious prosecution. Hiranmayi Srinivasan, Better Homes & Gardens, 5 Nov. 2021 One alleges slander and false statements made by Becerra, his family and friends made on social media. Annie Blanks, San Antonio Express-News, 2 Mar. 2022 These days Twitter is largely a festival of lies and self-referential light slander coated with a bunch of crazy anonymous people threatening to kill your dog. Heather Wilhelm, National Review, 17 Feb. 2022 One alleges slander and false statements made by Becerra, his family and friends. Annie Blanks, San Antonio Express-News, 10 Feb. 2022 Kebe is liable on two counts of slander, one count of libel, and one count of invasion of privacy, granting Cardi $1 million in damages for pain & suffering due to reputational damages, and $250,000 in medical expenses. Rivea Ruff, Essence, 25 Jan. 2022 Cultural slander such as this occurs only when deceit and falsehood become the cultural record. Armond White, National Review, 20 Oct. 2021 According to court documents, the jury found in favor of Walmart on other claims of false arrest, false imprisonment, malicious prosecution and slander. William Thornton | Wthornton@al.com, al, 29 Nov. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'slander.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of slander

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for slander

Noun

Middle English sclaundre, slaundre, from Anglo-French esclandre, alteration of escandle, from Late Latin scandalum stumbling block, offense — more at scandal entry 1

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Time Traveler for slander

Time Traveler

The first known use of slander was in the 13th century

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Dictionary Entries Near slander

SL and C

slander

slanderful

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Statistics for slander

Last Updated

2 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Slander.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/slander. Accessed 24 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for slander

slander

verb
slan·​der | \ ˈslan-dər How to pronounce slander (audio) \
slandered; slandering

Kids Definition of slander

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make a false and damaging statement against

slander

noun

Kids Definition of slander (Entry 2 of 2)

: a false statement that damages another person's reputation

slander

transitive verb
slan·​der | \ ˈslan-dər How to pronounce slander (audio) \

Legal Definition of slander

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to utter slander against

Other Words from slander

slanderer noun

slander

noun

Legal Definition of slander (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : defamation of a person by unprivileged oral communication made to a third party also : defamatory oral statements
2 : the tort of oral defamation sued his former employer for slander — compare defamation, false light, libel

Note: An action for slander may be brought without alleging and proving special damages if the statements in question have a plainly harmful character, as by imputing to the plaintiff criminal guilt, serious sexual misconduct, or conduct or a characteristic affecting his or her business or profession.

Other Words from slander

slanderous \ ˈslan-​də-​rəs How to pronounce slander (audio) \ adjective
slanderously adverb
slanderousness noun

History and Etymology for slander

Noun

Anglo-French esclandre, from Old French escandle esclandre scandal, from Late Latin scandalum moral stumbling block, disgrace, from Greek skandalon, literally, snare, trap

More from Merriam-Webster on slander

Nglish: Translation of slander for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of slander for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about slander

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