ridicule

noun
rid·​i·​cule | \ ˈri-də-ˌkyül How to pronounce ridicule (audio) \

Definition of ridicule

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of ridiculing : derision, mockery

ridicule

verb
ridiculed; ridiculing

Definition of ridicule (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to make fun of

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Other Words from ridicule

Verb

ridiculer noun

Synonyms for ridicule

Synonyms: Noun

derision, mockery, sport

Synonyms: Verb

deride, gibe (or jibe), jeer, laugh (at), mock, scout, shoot down, skewer

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Choose the Right Synonym for ridicule

Verb

ridicule, deride, mock, taunt mean to make an object of laughter of. ridicule implies a deliberate often malicious belittling. consistently ridiculed everything she said deride suggests contemptuous and often bitter ridicule. derided their efforts to start their own business mock implies scorn often ironically expressed as by mimicry or sham deference. youngsters began to mock the helpless wino taunt suggests jeeringly provoking insult or challenge. hometown fans taunted the visiting team

Examples of ridicule in a Sentence

Noun

She didn't show anyone her artwork for fear of ridicule. the early efforts by the suffragists to obtain voting rights for women were met with ridicule

Verb

The other kids ridiculed him for the way he dressed. They ridiculed all of her suggestions.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Scorn for precedent is the most venerable youth-culture tradition of them all, making hippies irrelevant as either forebears or entertaining objects of ridicule to anyone under 30. Tom Carson, Los Angeles Times, "Woodstock glorified them. Tarantino barbecued them. In 2019, whither the hippie?," 15 Aug. 2019 Granted, for being at the center of one of the biggest presidential scandals in American history, (and being subject to years of public ridicule and abuse because of it), Lewinsky has done pretty well for herself. Aj Willingham, CNN, "Monica Lewinsky shared the worst career advice she's gotten and, well...," 15 July 2019 But the president’s decision to attack them and subject them to further threats and public ridicule illustrates why women are reluctant to come forward with allegations against powerful men in the first place. Aaron Rupar, Vox, "Trump’s final preelection speeches featured vicious attacks on Kavanaugh accusers," 6 Nov. 2018 This was also a previous point of ridicule for some. Jonathan M. Gitlin, Ars Technica, "Formula E five years on: Cars Technica grades the electric racing series," 23 July 2019 Written by Jason Buckland and Ben Reiter What started as an iconic cover for SI’s 1998 Sportsmen of the Year issue lives on as the object of ridicule, now that the shadow of PEDs hangs over every one of Sammy Sosa and Mark McGwire’s heroics. SI.com, "Sports Illustrated's Where Are They Now? Stories," 23 June 2019 The announcement drew ridicule on social media after New York Times assistant managing editor Carolyn Ryan tweeted about the event. Joey Garrison, USA TODAY, "A 'Straight Pride' Parade in Boston? These three men have a proposed route and a tentative date," 4 June 2019 Only 17 years before, William Jennings Bryan had become an object of ridicule during the Scopes Trial in Dayton, Tenn., for his fundamentalist beliefs about creation. D.g. Hart, WSJ, "‘Skepticism and American Faith’ Review: Believe It or Not," 22 Aug. 2018 Kim's socializing with the NBA's enfant terrible Dennis Rodman also has set him up for ridicule. Krys Lee, Dallas News, "Book peers inside the hidden life of N. Korea's Kim Jong Un," 18 June 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

And he was ridiculed, he was mocked, he was called racist at that time. Dave Orrick, Twin Cities, "Kendall Qualls talks patriotism in America, Moynihan’s ‘Negro Family’ report, and Dean Phillips: The full interview," 29 July 2019 The thing that my Peruvian family used so discreetly here in the U.S. in order to not be ridiculed or ostracized is now a trend. Thatiana Diaz, refinery29.com, "Why Palo Santo Is More Than Just A "Fragrance Trend"," 25 July 2019 Germany’s Ursula von der Leyen succeeded European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker in a process ridiculed by Juncker for its lack of transparency. Dylan Bouscher, The Mercury News, "Political Cartoons: World news weekly roundup," 5 July 2019 Even New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, whose candidacy has been mostly ridiculed by the New York media, managed to have a decent showing. cleveland.com, "Tim Ryan’s coveted moment eludes him at first Democratic debate: analysis," 26 June 2019 The thing that my Peruvian family used so discreetly here in the U.S. in order to not be ridiculed or ostracised is now a trend. Thatiana Diaz, refinery29.com, "Why Palo Santo Is More Than Just A "Fragrance Trend"," 25 July 2019 At the time, West and his fashion cohorts were ridiculed by many of their music industry peers for their dandy fashion choices: the bright colors, the form-fitting silhouettes, the designer man bags. Chioma Nnadi, Vogue, "This Was the Decade That Hip-Hop Style Got Femme," 18 July 2019 The move came to light after Vienna Hotels, which operates 2,500 properties in China, fought back on social media this week, and other users jumped in to ridicule the move. Washington Post, "Chinese crackdown on foreign names draws protest," 22 June 2019 The investment world will ridicule the bears, not the bulls. Ken Fisher, USA TODAY, "If everyone else is worried about stocks, capitalize on the fear and make a fortune," 7 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'ridicule.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of ridicule

Noun

1675, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1680, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for ridicule

Noun

French or Latin; French, from Latin ridiculum jest

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Statistics for ridicule

Last Updated

25 Aug 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for ridicule

The first known use of ridicule was in 1675

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More Definitions for ridicule

ridicule

noun

English Language Learners Definition of ridicule

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of making fun of someone or something in a cruel or harsh way : harsh comments made by people who are laughing at someone or something

ridicule

verb

English Language Learners Definition of ridicule (Entry 2 of 2)

: to laugh at and make jokes about (someone or something) in a cruel or harsh way : to make fun of (someone or something)

ridicule

noun
rid·​i·​cule | \ ˈri-də-ˌkyül How to pronounce ridicule (audio) \

Kids Definition of ridicule

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of making fun of someone or something in a cruel or harsh way : mean or unkind comments or behavior

ridicule

verb
ridiculed; ridiculing

Kids Definition of ridicule (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make fun of in a cruel or harsh way They ridiculed the idea.

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More from Merriam-Webster on ridicule

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with ridicule

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for ridicule

Spanish Central: Translation of ridicule

Nglish: Translation of ridicule for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of ridicule for Arabic Speakers

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