ridicule

noun
rid·​i·​cule | \ ˈri-də-ˌkyül How to pronounce ridicule (audio) \

Definition of ridicule

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of ridiculing : derision, mockery

ridicule

verb
ridiculed; ridiculing

Definition of ridicule (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to make fun of

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from ridicule

Verb

ridiculer noun

Synonyms for ridicule

Synonyms: Noun

derision, mockery, sport

Synonyms: Verb

deride, gibe (or jibe), jeer, laugh (at), mock, scout, shoot down, skewer

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Choose the Right Synonym for ridicule

Verb

ridicule, deride, mock, taunt mean to make an object of laughter of. ridicule implies a deliberate often malicious belittling. consistently ridiculed everything she said deride suggests contemptuous and often bitter ridicule. derided their efforts to start their own business mock implies scorn often ironically expressed as by mimicry or sham deference. youngsters began to mock the helpless wino taunt suggests jeeringly provoking insult or challenge. hometown fans taunted the visiting team

Examples of ridicule in a Sentence

Noun

She didn't show anyone her artwork for fear of ridicule. the early efforts by the suffragists to obtain voting rights for women were met with ridicule

Verb

The other kids ridiculed him for the way he dressed. They ridiculed all of her suggestions.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

And now anyone who has genuinely found fidget spinners to have helped them probably wouldn't be caught dead playing with one if only to avoid stares from strangers who think the toy is worthy of ridicule. Popular Mechanics, "This AirPods Case Is Also a Fidget Spinner," 11 Apr. 2019 Hillary, everyone loves a rematch, but everyone also loves a winner -- the only thing she's won is ridicule. Greg Gutfeld, Fox News, "Gutfeld on 2020 Democratic contenders," 19 July 2018 The ridicule was ruthless, matched only by the anger Democrats directed at her for distracting from the election. Kimberley A. Strassel, WSJ, "Biggest Loser: Elizabeth Warren," 8 Nov. 2018 Quoted by the Daily Mirror, Gracia sounded deeply unimpressed by the ridicule that the England striker has faced in his increasingly desperate campaign to claim his third successive Premier League Golden Boot. SI.com, "'One of England's Best': Watford Boss Javi Gracia Slams Lack of Respect Shown to Tottenham Star," 30 Apr. 2018 The Journal should instead direct its ridicule at deceptive marketing that distorts supply and demand. WSJ, "Even Cracker Consumers Are Entitled to Clarity," 25 Dec. 2018 If the bully can’t be contained by the cajoling effects of ridicule or ostracism, the other men reach a consensus, make a plan and execute him. Richard Wrangham, WSJ, "Humans: The Domesticated Primates," 10 Jan. 2019 Much like Gwyneth Paltrow, who sells Moon Juice products on Goop, she’s taken the negative attention and lowkey ridicule and actually turned it into a booming lifestyle brand. Cheryl Wischhover, Vox, "Adaptogenic dusts, oils, and pills have a veneer of science, but there’s not much evidence to back them up.," 2 Nov. 2018 Those that choose to speak out often face backlash, skepticism, and ridicule. Abby Gardner, Glamour, "1,600 Men Show Their Support for Christine Blasey Ford in Full-Page New York Times Ad," 26 Sep. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Both women contend they were ridiculed, humiliated, suffered emotionally and became suicidal after the recordings were distributed. Lewis Kamb, The Seattle Times, "Second woman sues former Federal Way basketball star Jalen McDaniels over exploitative videos," 19 Dec. 2018 At times, Mund claimed pageant handlers ridiculed her clothing choices and chided her for wearing the same outfits too often. Jennifer Earl, Fox News, "Miss America pageant winners demand leaders resign amid bullying accusations," 21 Aug. 2018 Warren, who is seen as a potential 2020 challenger to Trump, appears to have taken a page out of his political playbook, striking back almost instantly at the president who continues to ridicule her claim of Native American ancestry. Darlene Superville, The Seattle Times, "Warren accuses Trump of ‘creepy’ comments about her DNA test," 15 Oct. 2018 Like many forward-thinking scientists, Wegener was ridiculed for his ideas at the time. Matt Blitz, Popular Mechanics, "How GPS Changed the Way We Think About Our Planet," 18 Apr. 2017 The Queen, duchesses, and princesses alike have been lauded (and unfortunately, ridiculed) for their selection of headwear. Blake Bakkila, Good Housekeeping, "QUIZ: Can You Match the Hat to the Royal?," 14 Sep. 2018 Leila Faris, a teenager marching with her mother, said the goal of the day in her mind was to ridicule President Trump as much as possible. Sophie Gilbert, The Atlantic, "A Very British Protest," 13 July 2018 Pocahontas’’ to ridicule her claims of Native American ancestry. Catherine Lucey And Matt Volz, BostonGlobe.com, "Trump urges ouster of senator he blames for derailing VA nod," 6 July 2018 D’Antoni was ridiculed by some for saying the pressure was on the Warriors entering Game 4. Jerome Solomon, San Francisco Chronicle, "At winning time, the Rockets were better than the Warriors," 22 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'ridicule.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of ridicule

Noun

1675, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1680, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for ridicule

Noun

French or Latin; French, from Latin ridiculum jest

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about ridicule

Statistics for ridicule

Last Updated

21 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for ridicule

The first known use of ridicule was in 1675

See more words from the same year

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for ridicule

ridicule

noun

English Language Learners Definition of ridicule

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of making fun of someone or something in a cruel or harsh way : harsh comments made by people who are laughing at someone or something

ridicule

verb

English Language Learners Definition of ridicule (Entry 2 of 2)

: to laugh at and make jokes about (someone or something) in a cruel or harsh way : to make fun of (someone or something)

ridicule

noun
rid·​i·​cule | \ ˈri-də-ˌkyül How to pronounce ridicule (audio) \

Kids Definition of ridicule

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of making fun of someone or something in a cruel or harsh way : mean or unkind comments or behavior

ridicule

verb
ridiculed; ridiculing

Kids Definition of ridicule (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make fun of in a cruel or harsh way They ridiculed the idea.

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on ridicule

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with ridicule

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for ridicule

Spanish Central: Translation of ridicule

Nglish: Translation of ridicule for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of ridicule for Arabic Speakers

Comments on ridicule

What made you want to look up ridicule? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

an act or instance of returning to life

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Words from Greek and Latin Quiz

  • roman forum
  • Which of the following months comes from a Latin word for “ten”?
Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Add Diction

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!