ridicule

noun
rid·i·cule | \ ˈri-də-ˌkyül \

Definition of ridicule 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of ridiculing : derision, mockery

ridicule

verb
ridiculed; ridiculing

Definition of ridicule (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to make fun of

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Other words from ridicule

Verb

ridiculer noun

Synonyms for ridicule

Synonyms: Noun

derision, mockery, sport

Synonyms: Verb

deride, gibe (or jibe), jeer, laugh (at), mock, scout, shoot down, skewer

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Verb

ridicule, deride, mock, taunt mean to make an object of laughter of. ridicule implies a deliberate often malicious belittling. consistently ridiculed everything she said deride suggests contemptuous and often bitter ridicule. derided their efforts to start their own business mock implies scorn often ironically expressed as by mimicry or sham deference. youngsters began to mock the helpless wino taunt suggests jeeringly provoking insult or challenge. hometown fans taunted the visiting team

Examples of ridicule in a Sentence

Noun

She didn't show anyone her artwork for fear of ridicule. the early efforts by the suffragists to obtain voting rights for women were met with ridicule

Verb

The other kids ridiculed him for the way he dressed. They ridiculed all of her suggestions.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Yet the handlers have a fascinating ability to withstand torrents of abuse and ridicule. Julia Duin, WSJ, "Christian Serpent-Handlers Protect Us All," 12 July 2018 Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp has been vocal in his support of current goalkeeper Loris Karius over the past week, with the German still the subject of criticism and ridicule following his disastrous performance in the Champions League final. SI.com, "Barcelona Goalkeeper Prepared to Submit Transfer Request Amid Rumours of Liverpool Interest," 9 July 2018 The scene takes all of the punch out of the jokes and ridicule that were common following the trial. Karen Han, Vox, "How A Very English Scandal spins sensationalism into empathy," 7 July 2018 The bust, which depicted a beady-eyed, smiling Ronaldo, became a viral sensation and prompted international ridicule. Fox News, "Widely mocked Cristiano Ronaldo bust replaced at Portugal airport," 18 June 2018 Unfortunately, González and her classmates’ outspokenness has also made them a target for criticism and ridicule by some on the right, as well as subject to death threats and conspiracy theories. Chas Danner, Daily Intelligencer, "People Are Sharing Fake Photos of Emma González Tearing Up the Constitution," 25 Mar. 2018 The fact that an event so ripe for ridicule hasn’t been an episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm until now is criminal. Mattie Kahn, Glamour, "Cazzie David Should Be the Next Bachelorette: A Proposal," 10 July 2018 At the time, the scandal was the subject of ridicule and disbelief. Karen Han, Vox, "How A Very English Scandal spins sensationalism into empathy," 7 July 2018 China’s unemployment numbers, by contrast, attract mostly ridicule. The Economist, "In developing countries, many people cannot afford not to work," 7 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

In 2016, Democrats ridiculed Senator Mitch McConnell's maneuver to deny Obama appointee, Merrick Garland, a vote before the election. NBC News, "Meet the Press - July 1, 2018," 1 July 2018 The film was widely ridiculed following the summit, with late night comics and even the New York Times getting in on the act with spoof versions of their own. Euan Mckirdy, CNN, "Destiny Pictures founder claims mistaken identity, distances himself from Trump video," 14 June 2018 On Thursday, the president ridiculed Flake's surname ahead of Flake's speech in the Senate on tariffs and free trade. Ronald J. Hansen, azcentral, "McCain, Flake push back on Trump's call for Russia to rejoin the G7," 8 June 2018 The campaign was widely ridiculed online, and Dollar never made it to the waiting list, which consisted mostly of billionaires. Cleve R. Wootson Jr., Washington Post, "A televangelist wants his followers to pay for a $54 million private jet. It’s his fourth plane.," 29 May 2018 Her social-media entranced daughter Tabitha ridicules mom’s obsession with some old punk rocker, and Abby questions the choices, memories, and likes (real, not social-media) that brought her to this point in life. Jim Rutter, Philly.com, "'I Will Not Go Gently' at People's Light: Jennifer Childs' indulgent look at an aging rock star," 26 Mar. 2018 The Karolyis, their coaching staff and sometimes other visiting coaches would publicly ridicule girls about their weight or bodies and force the gymnasts to work through devastating injuries. Mitch Weiss And Holbrook Mohr, Houston Chronicle, "US gymnasts tell AP sport rife with verbal, emotional abuse," 24 Feb. 2018 Will Smith’s unjustly ridiculed After Earth already addressed these issues, but Killmonger specifically personifies the street-fighter fury admired by emotionally damaged ghetto youths — the film’s primary market. Armond White, National Review, "Black Panther’s Circle of Hype," 16 Feb. 2018 Paul ridiculed the budget deal, which will increase defense spending by $165 billion over two years, and add $131 billion in non-defense spending in that same period. Jamie Dupree, AJC.com, "Senate approves budget deal, as overnight government shutdown could end before breakfast," 9 Feb. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'ridicule.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of ridicule

Noun

1675, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1680, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for ridicule

Noun

French or Latin; French, from Latin ridiculum jest

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Statistics for ridicule

Last Updated

25 Aug 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for ridicule

The first known use of ridicule was in 1675

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More Definitions for ridicule

ridicule

noun

English Language Learners Definition of ridicule

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of making fun of someone or something in a cruel or harsh way : harsh comments made by people who are laughing at someone or something

ridicule

verb

English Language Learners Definition of ridicule (Entry 2 of 2)

: to laugh at and make jokes about (someone or something) in a cruel or harsh way : to make fun of (someone or something)

ridicule

noun
rid·i·cule | \ ˈri-də-ˌkyül \

Kids Definition of ridicule

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of making fun of someone or something in a cruel or harsh way : mean or unkind comments or behavior

ridicule

verb
ridiculed; ridiculing

Kids Definition of ridicule (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make fun of in a cruel or harsh way They ridiculed the idea.

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