ridicule

noun
rid·​i·​cule | \ ˈri-də-ˌkyül How to pronounce ridicule (audio) \

Definition of ridicule

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of ridiculing : derision, mockery

ridicule

verb
ridiculed; ridiculing

Definition of ridicule (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to make fun of

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Other Words from ridicule

Verb

ridiculer noun

Synonyms for ridicule

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for ridicule

Verb

ridicule, deride, mock, taunt mean to make an object of laughter of. ridicule implies a deliberate often malicious belittling. consistently ridiculed everything she said deride suggests contemptuous and often bitter ridicule. derided their efforts to start their own business mock implies scorn often ironically expressed as by mimicry or sham deference. youngsters began to mock the helpless wino taunt suggests jeeringly provoking insult or challenge. hometown fans taunted the visiting team

Examples of ridicule in a Sentence

Noun She didn't show anyone her artwork for fear of ridicule. the early efforts by the suffragists to obtain voting rights for women were met with ridicule Verb The other kids ridiculed him for the way he dressed. They ridiculed all of her suggestions.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Unfortunately, the team's big announcement on social media ended in ridicule after a gaffe saw not a picture of Stam on the Twitter posting, but instead a photo of Ajax youth coach Tinus van Teunenbroek. CNN, "Oops! FC Cincinnati botches unveiling of new coach Jaap Stam," 23 May 2020 It has been speculated that Obama’s ridicule of Trump, especially at the 2011 White House Correspondents' Association Dinner, prompted the businessman and reality TV star to run for president. W. James Antle Iii, Washington Examiner, "'Preternatural calm': Democrats think Obama helps Biden draw a contrast with combative Trump," 19 May 2020 Regardless, the intense backlash and ridicule of the president overshadowed Bryan’s remarks. NBC News, "Inside the secret DHS lab testing how long coronavirus can survive on shopping carts and in sunlight," 6 May 2020 So how, in 22 years, did Bryant go from being the object of Jordan’s ridicule to the focus of Jordan’s tears? Los Angeles Times, "Koufax vs. Scully: Vote in the final round of our baseball icon regional," 5 May 2020 Houston Texans coach and general manager Bill O'Brien has received a lot of ridicule and criticism for his trade of DeAndre Hopkins to the Arizona Cardinals for David Johnson. Arizona Republic, "Houston Texans' Bill O'Brien implores fans, media not to judge DeAndre Hopkins trade yet," 17 Apr. 2020 Korn deserves both ridicule for catalyzing the nü-metal Dark Age and credit for surviving beyond it. oregonlive, "29 February concerts to love for Portland’s best live music," 28 Jan. 2020 The Super Tuesday coverage led by co-anchors Bret Baier and Martha MacCallum was straight-ahead, devoid of the combative ridicule of Democrats that is the trademark of the network’s popular prime-time shows. Stephen Battaglio, Los Angeles Times, "Joe Biden not so ‘sleepy’ when Fox News plays it straight on Super Tuesday," 4 Mar. 2020 Four years later, all that ridicule is boomeranging right back to Steele. Gilbert Garcia, ExpressNews.com, "Fire union antics produced nothing but disruption," 29 Jan. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The bureaucratic politics are plentiful, including sniping and sharp elbows from the other armed services (except for the Coast Guard, which the others repeatedly ridicule). Brian Lowry, CNN, "'Space Force' casts Steve Carell in a broad satire that never achieves liftoff," 29 May 2020 The comments come as Trump continues to treat face masks as something to mock, refusing to wear one in public and joining his staff and family in ridiculing his Democratic rival Joe Biden for doing otherwise. Michael Scherer, Anchorage Daily News, "Trump’s mockery of wearing masks divides Republicans," 27 May 2020 Shriver takes a familiar tack often used on Fox News: trivializing valid concerns by ridiculing their most absurd manifestations. Ariel Levy, The New Yorker, "Lionel Shriver Is Looking for Trouble," 25 May 2020 Beshear on Thursday cited cases of people ridiculing coworkers for wearing them. Sarah Ladd, The Courier-Journal, "Mask or no mask? Why Kentucky's new requirement to battle COVID-19 is causing such a fuss," 15 May 2020 The Biden interview came a few days after a post-midnight tweet from the president ridiculing a number of media personalities in cruel ways, including the cohost and spouse interviewing Biden that morning. Kathryn Jean Lopez, National Review, "The Coronavirus Reset," 4 May 2020 My saga didn’t unfold publicly under the scrutiny of fans, boosters and social media trolls ridiculing a teenager for being homesick. Arash Markazi, latimes.com, "Nothing wrong with Bru McCoy deciding Texas wasn’t right for him and returning to USC," 3 June 2019 Similar documents surfaced in 2006, after Trump was stung by a book written by Tim O’Brien that ridiculed his boasts of being worth as much as $6 billion. Peter Elkind, ProPublica, "Meet the Shadowy Accountants Who Do Trump’s Taxes and Help Him Seem Richer Than He Is," 8 May 2020 The author goes on to ridicule and scorn Leno for his comments. Jay Nordlinger, National Review, "Beware Elizabeth Warren? &c.," 13 Nov. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'ridicule.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of ridicule

Noun

1675, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1680, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for ridicule

Noun

French or Latin; French, from Latin ridiculum jest

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Time Traveler for ridicule

Time Traveler

The first known use of ridicule was in 1675

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Statistics for ridicule

Last Updated

1 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Ridicule.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ridicule. Accessed 2 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for ridicule

ridicule

noun
How to pronounce ridicule (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of ridicule

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of making fun of someone or something in a cruel or harsh way : harsh comments made by people who are laughing at someone or something

ridicule

verb

English Language Learners Definition of ridicule (Entry 2 of 2)

: to laugh at and make jokes about (someone or something) in a cruel or harsh way : to make fun of (someone or something)

ridicule

noun
rid·​i·​cule | \ ˈri-də-ˌkyül How to pronounce ridicule (audio) \

Kids Definition of ridicule

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of making fun of someone or something in a cruel or harsh way : mean or unkind comments or behavior

ridicule

verb
ridiculed; ridiculing

Kids Definition of ridicule (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make fun of in a cruel or harsh way They ridiculed the idea.

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