ridicule

noun
rid·​i·​cule | \ ˈri-də-ˌkyül How to pronounce ridicule (audio) \

Definition of ridicule

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of ridiculing : derision, mockery

ridicule

verb
ridiculed; ridiculing

Definition of ridicule (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to make fun of

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Other Words from ridicule

Verb

ridiculer noun

Synonyms for ridicule

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for ridicule

Verb

ridicule, deride, mock, taunt mean to make an object of laughter of. ridicule implies a deliberate often malicious belittling. consistently ridiculed everything she said deride suggests contemptuous and often bitter ridicule. derided their efforts to start their own business mock implies scorn often ironically expressed as by mimicry or sham deference. youngsters began to mock the helpless wino taunt suggests jeeringly provoking insult or challenge. hometown fans taunted the visiting team

Examples of ridicule in a Sentence

Noun She didn't show anyone her artwork for fear of ridicule. the early efforts by the suffragists to obtain voting rights for women were met with ridicule Verb The other kids ridiculed him for the way he dressed. They ridiculed all of her suggestions.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Deputy District Attorney Hung Bach said that despite the threats and ridicule, Emma bravely saw the case through, even testifying in court. Alex Riggins, San Diego Union-Tribune, "7 San Diegians honored by District Attorney as 2021 ‘Citizens of Courage’," 21 Apr. 2021 City residents and leaders face near-constant criticism and ridicule for our devastatingly high number of shootings and deaths. Heidi Stevens, Star Tribune, "Why don't Chicago's mass shootings count?," 7 Apr. 2021 City residents and leaders face near-constant criticism and ridicule for our devastatingly high number of shootings and deaths. Heidi Stevens, chicagotribune.com, "Column: Why aren’t Chicago’s mass shootings included in the outcry over recent violence in Atlanta, Colorado and California?," 5 Apr. 2021 Kim is suing for more than $10 million in damages, arguing the outlet and Svitek acted with malice to intentionally expose her to contempt and ridicule, damaged her reputation and caused her financial harm. Carlie Porterfield, Forbes, "GOP Congressional Candidate Sues ‘Texas Tribune’ Over Labeling Her Immigration Comments As Racist," 5 Apr. 2021 Life itself, then, could affront and ridicule and even torment the provocateur: the mocker brutally mocked by personal reality. New York Times, "Cynthia Ozick Calls the New Philip Roth Biography a ‘Narrative Masterwork’," 1 Apr. 2021 Inveterate gamers on Twitch once used to ridicule users who were on the platform for all chat and no play—to the extent that Twitch’s rules used to discourage the talkie format altogether. Samanth Subramanian, Quartz, "In lockdown, people tuned in to Twitch just to watch other people talk," 13 Apr. 2021 Transgender people already face a barrage of discrimination, incessant bullying and ridicule, and even occasional acts of violence for simply trying to be true to themselves. Paul Newberry, Star Tribune, "Column: Trans athletes not an issue but discrimination real," 27 Mar. 2021 Transgender people already face a barrage of discrimination, incessant bullying and ridicule, and even occasional acts of violence for simply trying to be true to themselves. Paul Newberry, ajc, "Column: Trans athletes a non-issue but discrimination real," 26 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb One of Washington’s guilty pleasures during the coronavirus crisis has been watching Room Rater critique and sometimes ridicule the Zoom backgrounds of politicians, journalists, and influencers, especially Republicans. Paul Bedard, Washington Examiner, "COVID fun site Room Rater also does ‘good,’ aiding Native Americans," 6 Apr. 2021 Mr Rigby may have been driven to ridicule the census by irritation at the intrusiveness of its questions, which were nosier than previously. The Economist, "The 2021 Census Britain's census form reveals the obsessions of different eras," 20 Mar. 2021 Critics won't hesitate to ridicule a trial that tells jurors about Floyd's love for his family but not his crimes. Albert W. Alschuler, Star Tribune, "'Spark of life' evidence could backfire in Floyd case," 18 Mar. 2021 In my experience, both gay and straight communities frequently ridicule those of us who identify as bisexual. Christian Weissmann, Los Angeles Times, "I am not 50% gay and 50% straight. I am 100% bisexual.," 13 Mar. 2021 Rather than ridicule him, Sam and her friends bond with Long Duk Dong over their shared experience as immigrants. Carlos Greaves, The New Yorker, "Plots of Nineteen-Eighties Movies if Their Protagonists Had Been People of Color," 27 Feb. 2021 This one is a Valentine's Day meme intended to ridicule the Milwaukee Police Department. Daniel Bice, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Bice: County supervisor posts Valentine's Day meme mocking MPD over Molotov cocktail gaffe," 19 Feb. 2021 Trump’s speeches, yet most of them could reject it, or even share it in order to deride or ridicule it. Siva Vaidhyanathan, The New Republic, "Making Sense of the Facebook Menace," 5 Jan. 2021 That’s been repeated a gazillion times, including from this corner, not because anybody wants to rip or ridicule the Cougars just for ripping’s and ridiculing’s sake. Gordon Monson, The Salt Lake Tribune, "Gordon Monson: How good is BYU, really? Maybe it doesn’t matter.," 27 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'ridicule.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of ridicule

Noun

1675, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1680, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for ridicule

Noun

French or Latin; French, from Latin ridiculum jest

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Time Traveler for ridicule

Time Traveler

The first known use of ridicule was in 1675

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Statistics for ridicule

Last Updated

9 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Ridicule.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ridicule. Accessed 15 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for ridicule

ridicule

noun

English Language Learners Definition of ridicule

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of making fun of someone or something in a cruel or harsh way : harsh comments made by people who are laughing at someone or something

ridicule

verb

English Language Learners Definition of ridicule (Entry 2 of 2)

: to laugh at and make jokes about (someone or something) in a cruel or harsh way : to make fun of (someone or something)

ridicule

noun
rid·​i·​cule | \ ˈri-də-ˌkyül How to pronounce ridicule (audio) \

Kids Definition of ridicule

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of making fun of someone or something in a cruel or harsh way : mean or unkind comments or behavior

ridicule

verb
ridiculed; ridiculing

Kids Definition of ridicule (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make fun of in a cruel or harsh way They ridiculed the idea.

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