molecule

noun
mol·​e·​cule | \ ˈmä-li-ˌkyül \

Definition of molecule 

1 : the smallest particle of a substance that retains all the properties (see property sense 1a) of the substance and is composed of one or more atoms (see atom sense 1a) a molecule of water a molecule of oxygen
2 : a tiny bit : particle a molecule of political honestyTime

Keep scrolling for more

Examples of molecule in a Sentence

There is not a molecule of evidence to support these charges. not a molecule of sense in that girl

Recent Examples on the Web

Another is that pro-inflammatory molecules can influence cognitive problems. Caitlin Granfield, miamiherald, "You've survived cancer, but your brain is fuzzy after the chemo. Here's what to do.," 29 May 2018 So Chen and his colleagues combined hyaluronic acid with another molecule called methacrylic anhydride. Kiona N. Smith, Ars Technica, "Delivering drugs directly to the eye using microneedles that dissolve," 9 Nov. 2018 Testing his theory, Winter designed an antibody to become attached to a small molecule called phOx. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "The 2018 Nobels in Chemistry Made Evolution Work For Us," 3 Oct. 2018 German pharmaceutical company Boehringer Ingelheim designed a small molecule called bibn4096bs to block CGRP’s receptor. Emily Underwood, Science | AAAS, "Will antibodies finally put an end to migraines?," 18 May 2018 This area docks with protrusions of carbohydrate molecules called sialic acids that bristle from cells. Bradley J. Fikes, sandiegouniontribune.com, "By luck, Scripps Research scientists find clue to a powerful new class of flu drugs," 2 Apr. 2018 Denby works in a lab that uses plant molecules called terpenes to create sustainable fuel. Julissa Treviño, Smithsonian, "Scientists Brew a Hoppy Beer Without the Hops," 21 Mar. 2018 Some of these small molecules, which kill their fellow microbes, are already used (by us) as antibiotics. Diana Gitig, Ars Technica, "Bacteria engage in chemical warfare against viruses," 5 Dec. 2018 The ions collide with normal air molecules, emitting ionic wind out of the plane's back and giving it flight. Sam Blum, Popular Mechanics, "This Completely Silent Airplane Achieves Flight With No Moving Parts," 26 Nov. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'molecule.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of molecule

1701, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for molecule

French molécule, from New Latin molecula, diminutive of Latin moles mass

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about molecule

Statistics for molecule

Last Updated

11 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for molecule

The first known use of molecule was in 1701

See more words from the same year

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for molecule

molecule

noun

English Language Learners Definition of molecule

: the smallest possible amount of a particular substance that has all the characteristics of that substance

: a very small amount of something

molecule

noun
mol·​e·​cule | \ ˈmä-li-ˌkyül \

Kids Definition of molecule

: the smallest portion of a substance having the properties of the substance a molecule of water

molecule

noun
mol·​e·​cule | \ ˈmäl-i-ˌkyü(ə)l \

Medical Definition of molecule 

: the smallest particle of a substance that retains all the properties of the substance and is composed of one or more atoms

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on molecule

What made you want to look up molecule? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

a person who helps groups work together

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Liar, Liar Quiz

  • alt-5761dbe2ba986
  • Someone who pretends to be sick in order to avoid work is a:
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Word Winder's CrossWinder

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!