redundant

adjective
re·​dun·​dant | \ ri-ˈdən-dənt \

Definition of redundant

1a : exceeding what is necessary or normal : superfluous
b : characterized by or containing an excess specifically : using more words than necessary
c : characterized by similarity or repetition a group of particularly redundant brick buildings
d chiefly British : no longer needed for a job and hence laid off
3 : serving as a duplicate for preventing failure of an entire system (such as a spacecraft) upon failure of a single component

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Other Words from redundant

redundantly adverb

Examples of redundant in a Sentence

The drone had originally been designed to go places the Blackbird could not, but it had become redundant on discovery of the fact that there was nowhere the SR-71 could not go in safety … — Tom Clancy, The Cardinal of the Kremlin, 1989 Undoubtedly in ninety-nine cases out of a hundred a witness to an occurrence is someone who has seen it. Therefore, some editors have said, eyewitness is a redundant word and it should be consigned to the dustbin. — Theodore M. Bernstein, Mrs. Thistlebottom's Hobgoblins, 1971 There they sat, grounded upon the ground, silent, uncomplaining, with bowed heads, a pathetic sight. And by hideous contrast, a redundant orator was making a speech to another gathering not thirty steps away … — Mark Twain, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, 1889 He edited the paper and removed any redundant information or statements. Avoid redundant expressions in your writing. Some people say that since all adages are old, the phrase “old adage” is redundant.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Big sales of insurance units by Anbang are likely to be difficult, according to industry analysts, because some operations would be redundant to other big insurers. Chao Deng, WSJ, "Anbang Sells Securities Unit in First Big Asset Sale to Raise Cash," 14 Sep. 2018 To say that the City of Angels is having its day in the sun right now seems somewhat redundant. Mark Holgate, Vogue, "Le Bon Marché in Paris Is About to Give Itself a Los Angeles Makeover," 27 Aug. 2018 When high-volume, redundant tasks are performed through computer automation, humans are freed up to expend energy pursuing a wider range of interpretive or conceptual work. Fox News, "Air Force brings AI to B-2, F-35 and F-15," 31 July 2018 The tiny mechanical assistants will also act as a redundant communication relay system in order to see whether NASA could rely solely on small satellites for that job in the future. Meghan Bartels, Space.com, "Tiny Satellites Headed to Mars Likely Are First of Many," 17 Sep. 2018 This approach avoids redundant design, and more importantly, added costs. Matthew Jancer, Popular Mechanics, "Straight From the Grave: An Iconic Engine Design Makes a Comeback," 21 Aug. 2018 The stories in a lot of cartoons barely scratched the surface of innovation or imagination, and would often become redundant with save-the-day plotlines. Alex Abad-santos, Vox, "She-Ra and the Princesses of Power honors and challenges the original She-Ra.," 21 Nov. 2018 Wedding season has arrived, and strolling through Target to snag another dishware set or standing mixer can become redundant and unexciting. Christen A. Johnson, chicagotribune.com, "Paying for student loans, IVF with wedding money? Cash, charity registries increasingly common, study says," 22 June 2018 My health suffered, my performance and relationships at Deloitte were strained and I was eventually made redundant. NBC News, "Former Deloitte employee: Company 'failed me' in blocking sexual assault investigation," 9 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'redundant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of redundant

1594, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for redundant

Latin redundant-, redundans, present participle of redundare to overflow — more at redound

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Statistics for redundant

Last Updated

8 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for redundant

The first known use of redundant was in 1594

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More Definitions for redundant

redundant

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of redundant

: repeating something else and therefore unnecessary
technical used to describe part of a machine, system, etc., that has the same function as another part and that exists so that the entire machine, system, etc., will not fail if the main part fails
British : dismissed from a job because you are no longer needed

redundant

adjective
re·​dun·​dant | \ ri-ˈdən-dənt \

Medical Definition of redundant

: characterized by or containing an excess or superfluous amount redundant pharyngeal tissue

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