redound

verb
re·dound | \ri-ˈdau̇nd \
redounded; redounding; redounds

Definition of redound 

intransitive verb

1 archaic : to become swollen : overflow

2 : to have an effect for good or ill new power alignments which may or may not redound to the faculty's benefit— G. W. Bonham

3 : to become transferred or added : accrue

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Did You Know?

Although it looks and sounds like a number of similar words (including rebound, resound, abound, and redundant), redound is a distinct term. It developed from Middle French redunder, which in turn came from Latin redundare, meaning "to overflow." In its earliest known English uses in the late 1300s, redound meant "to overflow" or "to abound," but those senses are now considered archaic. In current use, redound is often followed by "to," and the effect can be positive (as in our example sentences) or negative ("[It] probably would have redounded strongly to my disadvantage if I had pursued to completion my resolution...." - Joseph Heller, God Knows).

Examples of redound in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

If anything, paychecks in desirable jobs would be free to shrink to honorarium size, and choice opportunity would again redound to the rich, for whom the shrinkage would not mean very much. Nathan Heller, The New Yorker, "Who Really Stands to Win from Universal Basic Income?," 24 Mar. 2014 Overall, recent intraparty struggles have redounded to progressives’ benefit even as the insurgent-outsider-storms-the-gates dynamic of the Bernie Sanders campaign has been left behind. Sam Rosenfeld, Vox, "The Democratic Party is moving steadily leftward. So why does the left still distrust it?," 22 June 2018 Stabilizing those loads will also redound to the benefit of the grid, which may eventually convince utilities to adopt the technology at a broader level. David Roberts, Vox, "This technology could fundamentally change our relationship to electricity," 5 June 2018 And that effect could redound beyond solar, helping normalize renewable energy (and carbon policy) more generally. David Roberts, Vox, "California will require solar panels on all new homes. That’s not necessarily a good thing.," 15 May 2018 Any development that diverts the public’s attention to health care — and thus, to the two parties’ disparate fiscal priorities — is likely to redound to the Democrats’ benefit. Eric Levitz, Daily Intelligencer, "Why Democrats Could See a Polling Boost Right Before the Midterms," 2 Apr. 2018 His accomplishments–a massive corporate tax cut, a strong stock market–have largely redounded to the benefit of the bankers and fat cats. Time, "Why Trump’s ‘Forgotten Man’ Still Supports Him," 15 Feb. 2018 Now that Republicans have reversed their position once again, also in a way that happens to redound to their political benefit, the answer seems a little more clear. Jonathan Chait, Daily Intelligencer, "Republicans Stopped Sabotaging the Economy Because They Have the White House Now," 8 Feb. 2018 To me, this redounded to a fairly simple principle. Jon Wertheim, SI.com, "50 Parting Thoughts from the 2018 Australian Open," 28 Jan. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'redound.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of redound

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for redound

Middle English, from Middle French redunder, from Latin redundare, from re-, red- re- + unda wave — more at water

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Time Traveler for redound

The first known use of redound was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for redound

redound

verb

English Language Learners Definition of redound

: to have a particular result

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