accrue

verb
ac·​crue | \ ə-ˈkrü How to pronounce accrue (audio) \
accrued; accruing

Definition of accrue

intransitive verb

1 : to come into existence as a legally enforceable claim
2a : to come about as a natural growth, increase, or advantage the wisdom that accrues with age
b : to come as a direct result of some state or action rewards due to the feminine will accrue to me— Germaine Greer
3 : to accumulate or be added periodically interest accrues on a daily basis

transitive verb

: to accumulate or have due after a period of time accrue vacation time

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from accrue

accruable \ ə-​ˈkrü-​ə-​bəl How to pronounce accruable (audio) \ adjective
accruement \ ə-​ˈkrü-​mənt How to pronounce accruement (audio) \ noun

Examples of accrue in a Sentence

I'll get back all the money I invested, plus any interest and dividends that have accrued. investments that have accrued interest and dividends
Recent Examples on the Web As with the Khan’s ancient cash, the biggest benefits are likely to accrue to the state. Robert Hackett, Fortune, "Inside China’s drive for digital currency dominance," 10 Aug. 2020 Interest won’t accrue on subsidized loans during an unemployment deferment. cleveland, "Student loan borrowers: Don’t wait on congress for more relief," 9 Aug. 2020 In any case, interest on the mortgage continues to accrue during the forbearance period, adding to the overall cost of a home. Ana Radelat And Kasturi Pananjady, courant.com, "Report: Number of Connecticut homeowners delinquent on mortgage payments more than doubles since February," 3 Aug. 2020 Monday dawns with Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden even in first-choice support at 25% each in our baseline model, Pete Buttigieg very close behind at 21%, and Elizabeth Warren at 16%, also in position to accrue some national delegates. CBS News, "CBS News Eye on Trends: The latest from the Election & Survey Unit," 30 July 2020 The net benefit of a low borrowing cost will accrue in the long term. Misheck Mutize, Quartz Africa, "Why African countries are reluctant to take up Covid-19 debt relief," 30 July 2020 The downturn didn’t change the study’s numbers, in large part because Perryman had assumed the law would pass next year and the benefits would accrue steadily over the next several decades. Allie Morris, Dallas News, "How to boost Texas’ economy and humanity? Be more welcoming to LGBTQ residents — and make it a law," 31 May 2020 Delivery app companies would be liable for up to $500 in civil penalties if the order is violated and the fine would accrue every day and for every restaurant overcharged. oregonlive, "Portland approves 10% cap on fees that food delivery apps can charge restaurants," 8 July 2020 The machinery used by many of these viruses to copy their genomes is particularly sloppy, which means that errors—new mutations—can quickly accrue, raising the odds of hitting upon mutations that allow the virus to switch hosts. Rachel Ehrenberg, Ars Technica, "The bat-virus détente," 3 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'accrue.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of accrue

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for accrue

Middle English acrewen, acruwen, probably borrowed from Anglo-French *acreue "increase," noun derivative from feminine of acreu, past participle of acreistre "to increase, grow," going back to Latin accrēscere, from ad- ad- + crēscere "to grow" — more at crescent entry 1

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about accrue

Time Traveler for accrue

Time Traveler

The first known use of accrue was in the 15th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for accrue

Last Updated

14 Aug 2020

Cite this Entry

“Accrue.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/accrue. Accessed 14 Aug. 2020.

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for accrue

accrue

verb
How to pronounce accrue (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of accrue

formal
: to increase in value or amount gradually as time passes : to grow or build up slowly
: to come to or be given to someone

accrue

verb
ac·​crue | \ ə-ˈkrü How to pronounce accrue (audio) \
accrued; accruing

Legal Definition of accrue

intransitive verb

1 : to come into existence as an enforceable claim : vest as a right action…does not accrue until the plaintiff knew or reasonably should have known that he may have suffered injuryNational Law Journal

Note: Statutes of limitations begin to run when a cause of action accrues.

2 : to come by way of increase or addition : arise as a growth or result usually used with to or from advantages accruing to society from the freedom of the press interest accrues to the seller as a result of the delay
3 : to be periodically accumulated in the process of time whether as an increase or a decrease the accruing of taxes allowing the receivable interest to accrue

transitive verb

1 : to accumulate or have due after a period of time authorized by law to accrue leave in the maximum amount of 90 days
2 : to enter in the books as an accrual

History and Etymology for accrue

Middle French accreue increase, addition to a property, from feminine of accreu, past participle of acreistre to increase

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on accrue

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for accrue

Spanish Central: Translation of accrue

Nglish: Translation of accrue for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of accrue for Arabic Speakers

Comments on accrue

What made you want to look up accrue? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Name That Thing: Animal Edition

  • alt 5a023732e6f75
  • Name that animal:
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Dictionary Devil

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!