recede

verb (1)
re·​cede | \ ri-ˈsēd How to pronounce recede (audio) \
receded; receding

Definition of recede

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a : to move back or away : withdraw a receding hairline
b : to slant backward
2 : to grow less or smaller : diminish, decrease a receding deficit

recede

verb (2)
re·​cede | \ (ˌ)rē-ˈsēd How to pronounce recede (audio) \
receded; receding; recedes

Definition of recede (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to cede back to a former possessor

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Choose the Right Synonym for recede

Verb (1)

recede, retreat, retract, back mean to move backward. recede implies a gradual withdrawing from a forward or high fixed point in time or space. the flood waters gradually receded retreat implies withdrawal from a point or position reached. retreating soldiers retract implies drawing back from an extended position. a cat retracting its claws back is used with up, down, out, or off to refer to any retrograde motion. backed off on the throttle

Examples of recede in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Covid-19, thanks to heroic pharma innovators, will recede. Rich Karlgaard, Forbes, 8 June 2021 Other analysts also are dusting off their crystal balls in an effort to predict when COVID-19 pandemic will recede in the United States. Julie Washington, cleveland, 20 May 2021 The deficit would recede slightly in the following years before growing again to nearly $1.6 trillion by 2031. New York Times, 27 May 2021 The military-style, heavily armed police tactical teams that are more prevalent these days would recede from view, deployed in only the most dangerous scenarios. BostonGlobe.com, 24 Apr. 2021 Despite the rapidly accelerating pace of vaccination, the pandemic will not recede overnight, said experts who praised the detail and scientific grounding of the C.D.C. recommendations. New York Times, 8 Mar. 2021 From that point to his death a few hours later, his rhetorical strength continues to recede and abandon him, like air leaking from a balloon. Nicholas Frankovich, National Review, 4 Apr. 2021 There is a crispness to the hard edges of the blocks of color – the jacket, the T-shirt, the house, that make the colors pop while the facial details recede into a more quiet zone. Tom Teicholz, Forbes, 15 Apr. 2021 But the administration would be foolish to suppose the surge will recede on its own. Bret Stephens New York Times, Star Tribune, 6 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Covid-19, thanks to heroic pharma innovators, will recede. Rich Karlgaard, Forbes, 8 June 2021 So while Covid restrictions may soon recede into the past, the Republican Party seems determined to stay in the surreal era, with a cast of characters that impress far more for their outrageous behavior than for any thoughtful proposals. Frida Ghitis, CNN, 14 May 2021 There is a crispness to the hard edges of the blocks of color – the jacket, the T-shirt, the house, that make the colors pop while the facial details recede into a more quiet zone. Tom Teicholz, Forbes, 15 Apr. 2021 Other analysts also are dusting off their crystal balls in an effort to predict when COVID-19 pandemic will recede in the United States. Julie Washington, cleveland, 20 May 2021 From that point to his death a few hours later, his rhetorical strength continues to recede and abandon him, like air leaking from a balloon. Nicholas Frankovich, National Review, 4 Apr. 2021 The military-style, heavily armed police tactical teams that are more prevalent these days would recede from view, deployed in only the most dangerous scenarios. BostonGlobe.com, 24 Apr. 2021 But the administration would be foolish to suppose the surge will recede on its own. Bret Stephens New York Times, Star Tribune, 6 Apr. 2021 The findings, published this month in Geophysical Research Letters, suggest this commotion can be tapped for useful clues as to how quickly glaciers may recede as temperatures climb—and thus how fast global sea levels might rise. Stephanie Pappas, Scientific American, 29 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'recede.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of recede

Verb (1)

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb (2)

1771, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for recede

Verb (1)

Middle English, from Latin recedere to go back, from re- + cedere to go

Verb (2)

re- + cede

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Time Traveler for recede

Time Traveler

The first known use of recede was in the 15th century

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Statistics for recede

Last Updated

14 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Recede.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/recede. Accessed 25 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for recede

recede

verb
re·​cede | \ ri-ˈsēd How to pronounce recede (audio) \
receded; receding

Kids Definition of recede

1 : to move back or away Floodwaters are receding.
2 : to become smaller or weaker … I heard … footsteps receding.— Avi, Crispin

More from Merriam-Webster on recede

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for recede

Nglish: Translation of recede for Spanish Speakers

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