recede

verb (1)
re·​cede | \ ri-ˈsēd How to pronounce recede (audio) \
receded; receding

Definition of recede

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a : to move back or away : withdraw a receding hairline
b : to slant backward
2 : to grow less or smaller : diminish, decrease a receding deficit

recede

verb (2)
re·​cede | \ (ˌ)rē-ˈsēd How to pronounce recede (audio) \
receded; receding; recedes

Definition of recede (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to cede back to a former possessor

Choose the Right Synonym for recede

Verb (1)

recede, retreat, retract, back mean to move backward. recede implies a gradual withdrawing from a forward or high fixed point in time or space. the flood waters gradually receded retreat implies withdrawal from a point or position reached. retreating soldiers retract implies drawing back from an extended position. a cat retracting its claws back is used with up, down, out, or off to refer to any retrograde motion. backed off on the throttle

Examples of recede in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb While no one has been reported killed or injured, waters were only starting to recede Tuesday, and the full extent of the destruction wasn’t yet known. Amy Beth Hanson And, BostonGlobe.com, 14 June 2022 Unfortunately, the longer that inflation runs rampant, the more likely the U.S. will slip into a recession – and the more likely stocks will recede into bear territory. Q.ai - Powering A Personal Wealth Movement, Forbes, 18 May 2022 So while Covid restrictions may soon recede into the past, the Republican Party seems determined to stay in the surreal era, with a cast of characters that impress far more for their outrageous behavior than for any thoughtful proposals. Frida Ghitis, CNN, 14 May 2021 Although the pandemic will eventually recede, the demand for virtual care is here to stay. Prabhat Sharma, Forbes, 2 June 2022 Water restrictions in the West are becoming commonplace as the megadrought intensifies and reservoir levels continue to recede -- including in recreational facilities that require ample amounts of irrigation. Julia Jacobo, ABC News, 20 June 2022 The flooding started to slowly recede Tuesday, but the record-level floods left all five entrances to the park closed through at least Wednesday, officials said. Laura L. Davis, USA TODAY, 14 June 2022 The dry day could also help area rivers to recede and reduce some of the flooding and high flows created by last weekend’s atmospheric river. oregonlive, 14 June 2022 Instead, inflation might gradually recede, as the higher borrowing costs engineered by the Fed restrain but don’t crush consumer spending and business investment. Larry Edelman, BostonGlobe.com, 19 June 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb On the flip side, Anelle intentionally allowed other spaces to recede and create a pause from overpowering visual stimulation. Krissa Rossbund, Better Homes & Gardens, 19 July 2022 As we’re reminded by the sight of characters repeatedly donning face masks, that world doesn’t recede politely into the background, even when inconvenient desires intrude and a home starts to feel like uncharted territory. Justin Changfilm Critic, Los Angeles Times, 7 July 2022 The flooding started to slowly recede Tuesday, but the record-level floods left all five entrances to the park closed through at least Wednesday, officials said. Laura L. Davis, USA TODAY, 14 June 2022 While no one has been reported killed or injured, waters were only starting to recede Tuesday, and the full extent of the destruction wasn’t yet known. Amy Beth Hanson And, BostonGlobe.com, 14 June 2022 They are not administered once a person develops symptoms, which usually recede within one to two weeks. Alison Dirr, Journal Sentinel, 11 July 2022 Unfortunately, the longer that inflation runs rampant, the more likely the U.S. will slip into a recession – and the more likely stocks will recede into bear territory. Q.ai - Powering A Personal Wealth Movement, Forbes, 18 May 2022 Water restrictions in the West are becoming commonplace as the megadrought intensifies and reservoir levels continue to recede -- including in recreational facilities that require ample amounts of irrigation. Julia Jacobo, ABC News, 20 June 2022 Instead, inflation might gradually recede, as the higher borrowing costs engineered by the Fed restrain but don’t crush consumer spending and business investment. Larry Edelman, BostonGlobe.com, 19 June 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'recede.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of recede

Verb (1)

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb (2)

1771, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for recede

Verb (1)

Middle English, from Latin recedere to go back, from re- + cedere to go

Verb (2)

re- + cede

Learn More About recede

Time Traveler for recede

Time Traveler

The first known use of recede was in the 15th century

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Dictionary Entries Near recede

recce

recede

recedence

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Statistics for recede

Last Updated

1 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Recede.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/recede. Accessed 14 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for recede

recede

verb
re·​cede | \ ri-ˈsēd How to pronounce recede (audio) \
receded; receding

Kids Definition of recede

1 : to move back or away Floodwaters are receding.
2 : to become smaller or weaker … I heard … footsteps receding.— Avi, Crispin: The Cross of Lead

More from Merriam-Webster on recede

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for recede

Nglish: Translation of recede for Spanish Speakers

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