abate

verb
\ ə-ˈbāt How to pronounce abate (audio) \
abated; abating

Definition of abate

intransitive verb

1 : to decrease in force or intensity waiting for the storm to abate
2a : to become defeated or become null or void (as of a writ or appeal)
b : to decrease in amount or value The legacies abated proportionately.

transitive verb

1a : to put an end to abate a nuisance
b : nullify sense 1 abate a writ
2a : to reduce in degree or intensity : moderate may abate their rancor to win peace
b : to reduce in value or amount : to make less especially by way of relief abate a tax
3 : deduct, omit abate part of the price
4a : to beat down or cut away so as to leave a figure in relief
b obsolete : blunt

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Other Words from abate

abater noun

Choose the Right Synonym for abate

abate, subside, wane, ebb mean to die down in force or intensity. abate stresses the idea of progressive diminishing. the storm abated subside implies the ceasing of turbulence or agitation. the protests subsided after a few days wane suggests the fading or weakening of something good or impressive. waning enthusiasm ebb suggests the receding of something (such as the tide) that commonly comes and goes. the ebbing of daylight

synonyms see in addition decrease

Examples of abate in a Sentence

For a while, in the Cold War's aftermath, the public fascination for espionage may abate, though somehow I doubt it. — John le Carré, Boston Globe, 19 Nov. 1989 At about six, as the heat abated, people began to crowd the streets and marketplaces, and to fill the cafés. — Milton Viorst, New Yorker, 12 Oct. 1987 But his attitude of sullen grievance and simmering fury never abated fully. — Joseph Heller, God Knows, 1984 We waited for the wind to abate. interest in the author's home abated as her novels waned in popularity
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Recent Examples on the Web Some of that imbalance may now abate as the U.S. shifts back toward demanding services and China is slowed by austerity and a weaker-than-expected vaccination effort. Noah Smith, Star Tribune, "America's economy will be back on top," 23 Mar. 2021 The chatter about Gita’s visit to a fetish priest did not abate after the wedding. Imbolo Mbue, The New Yorker, "The Case for and Against Love Potions," 15 Mar. 2021 Rarely, the phantom does not abate; Leopold occasionally sees patients who have had olfactory phantoms for decades. Kate Baggaley, Popular Science, "This strange condition could explain why your tongue feels weird," 5 Mar. 2021 But my fondness for flour will never abate, albeit for different reasons. Lucas Kwan Peterson Food Columnist, Los Angeles Times, "What We’re Into: The sobaquera from El Ruso in Boyle Heights," 4 Mar. 2021 In Australia, such programs have helped landowners, including many who are Indigenous, secure government contracts to abate about 14 million metric tons carbon over an average of eight and a half years. Nancy Averett, Scientific American, "How Starting Brush Fires Could Save Africa’s Disappearing Lions," 15 Mar. 2021 The city has declared the property at 9114 Bramley Dr. in Independence to be an unsafe building and public nuisance that city officials plan to abate. Laura Bednar, cleveland, "Independence takes action toward removing another dilapidated home in the city," 8 Mar. 2021 Although the snow is expected to abate on Monday, North Texas is set for lows in the single digits Monday and Tuesday, and wind chill values could drop to below 0 degrees, the Weather Service cautioned. Dallas News, "Freezing rain causes icys roads across Dallas-Fort Worth early Saturday ahead of major winter storm," 13 Feb. 2021 At least 2,362 residents have succumbed to the virus since March, and further deaths are expected even as the surge continues to abate. Lauren Caruba, San Antonio Express-News, "'In the right direction': San Antonio officials report 235 coronavirus cases, one new death as transmission continues to decline," 8 Feb. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'abate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of abate

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for abate

Middle English abaten, borrowed from Anglo-French abatre "to strike down, fell, reduce, put an end to," from a-, prefix in transitive verbs (going back to Latin ad- ad-) + batre "to beat," going back to Latin battuere, of uncertain origin

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Time Traveler for abate

Time Traveler

The first known use of abate was in the 14th century

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Statistics for abate

Last Updated

2 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Abate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/abate. Accessed 11 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for abate

abate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of abate

: to become weaker : to decrease in strength

abate

verb
\ ə-ˈbāt How to pronounce abate (audio) \
abated; abating

Kids Definition of abate

: to make or become less The flood abated slowly.

Other Words from abate

abatement \ -​mənt \ noun The noise continued without abatement.

abate

verb
\ ə-ˈbāt How to pronounce abate (audio) \
abated; abating

Legal Definition of abate

transitive verb

1a : to put an end to or do away with abate a nuisance
b : to make void : nullify abate an action
2 : to reduce in amount especially proportionately abate a tax

intransitive verb

1 : to become defeated or become null or void when a public officer who is a party to an appeal…in an official capacity dies…the action does not abateFederal Rules of Appellate Procedure Rule 43
2 : to decrease in amount or value the legacies abated proportionately

Note: A problem arises in estate law when the amount of the bequests and devises made in a will exceeds the assets available in the estate. In such a case, some or all of the bequests and devises may have to be abated to make up the deficit. Under the Uniform Probate Code, property in the estate that is not given under the will abates first, residuary devises abate second, general devises abate third, and specific devises abate last.

History and Etymology for abate

Old French abattre, literally, to knock down, from a-, prefix stressing result + battre to beat

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More from Merriam-Webster on abate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for abate

Nglish: Translation of abate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of abate for Arabic Speakers

Comments on abate

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