rebound

verb
re·​bound | \ ˈrē-ˌbau̇nd How to pronounce rebound (audio) , ri-ˈbau̇nd \
rebounded; rebounding; rebounds

Definition of rebound

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a : to spring back on or as if on collision or impact with another body
b : to recover from setback or frustration
2 : reecho
3 : to gain possession of a rebound in basketball

transitive verb

: to cause to rebound

rebound

noun
re·​bound | \ ˈrē-ˌbau̇nd How to pronounce rebound (audio) , ri-ˈbau̇nd \

Definition of rebound (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the action of rebounding : recoil
b : an upward leap or movement : recovery a sharp rebound in prices
2a : a basketball or hockey puck that rebounds
b : the act or an instance of gaining possession of a basketball rebound leads the league in rebounds
3 : a reaction to setback, frustration, or crisis on the rebound from an unhappy love affair

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Other Words from rebound

Verb

rebounder \ ˈrē-​ˌbau̇n-​dər How to pronounce rebound (audio) , ri-​ˈbau̇n-​ \ noun

Examples of rebound in a Sentence

Verb The baseball rebounded off the wall. She rebounded quickly from the loss. She is good at both shooting and rebounding. He rebounded the ball and quickly passed it to a teammate. Noun He led the league in rebounds last year.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The 46 economies across the Asia-Pacific region, excluding Japan and Australia, are projected to rebound from the pandemic and grow by 7.3% this year. Amy Gunia, Time, "Asia's Economies Are Set to Rebound From COVID-19 Faster Than the U.S. or Europe—If They Can Step Up Vaccine Rollouts," 28 Apr. 2021 Many students are starting to rebound from academic setbacks caused by the pandemic, according to a report released Tuesday on new testing data. WSJ, "Covid-19 Live Updates: Newly Reported Infections Fall in the U.S.," 21 Apr. 2021 Mehigan said the airport is seeing an increase in pick-ups and drop-offs at the airport as travel begins to rebound from sharp declines during the pandemic. BostonGlobe.com, "‘Did a parking garage write this?’ Logan deletes Earth Day tweet about driving to the airport after criticism," 19 Apr. 2021 Global carbon emissions are expected to surge this year as parts of the world begins to rebound from the coronavirus pandemic. Washington Post, "Carbon emissions on track to surge as world rebounds from pandemic," 19 Apr. 2021 And sales at retail stores and restaurants jumped 9.8% in March, the biggest gain since last May, when the economy first started to rebound from the virus’ initial blow. Christopher Rugaber And Joseph Pisani, The Christian Science Monitor, "Spending up, layoffs down: Promising signs for US economy," 16 Apr. 2021 And sales at retail stores and restaurants jumped 9.8% in March, the biggest gain since last May, when the economy first started to rebound from the virus' initial blow. Christopher Rugaber And Joseph Pisani, Star Tribune, "With layoffs down and spending up, US rebound gains momentum," 15 Apr. 2021 Would the catcher be able to rebound from the worst year of his career at the plate? Kristie Ackert, courant.com, "Gary Sanchez, Gerrit Cole only Yankees who did their jobs Opening Day vs. Blue Jays," 1 Apr. 2021 While travel has yet to rebound from the depths of the COVID-19 pandemic that dealt a gut punch to the airline industry, the number of flights scheduled out of Milwaukee Saturday is similar to a record set in 2018. Joe Taschler, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Saturday will be busiest day at Mitchell International airport since COVID-19 began. Here's what you need to know.," 26 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The gain marks a rebound for Montana, which had two congressional seats for most of the 20th century but lost one after the 1990 census. Mike Schneider, ajc, "Winners and losers from first release of 2020 census data," 27 Apr. 2021 The gain marks a rebound for Montana, which had two congressional seats for most of the 20th century but lost one after the 1990 census. Mike Schneider, Star Tribune, "Winners and losers from first release of 2020 census data," 26 Apr. 2021 Jackson got the rebound for Memphis with one second remaining and was fouled by Lillard. oregonlive, "Portland Trail Blazers can’t slow down Memphis Grizzlies’ transition offense, fall 130-128: Game rewind," 23 Apr. 2021 There are signs of an economic rebound for the Bay Area fueled in part by tech giants, with offices reopening and Facebook and Google expanding offices around the region. Roland Li, San Francisco Chronicle, "S.F. loses status as most expensive U.S. office market, dropping below Manhattan after five years on top," 5 Apr. 2021 Keon Ellis missed a free throw, but teammate Juan Gary got the rebound and layup for a 54-53 Alabama lead. Ben Bolch, Los Angeles Times, "UCLA defeats Alabama in overtime thriller to reach NCAA tournament Elite Eight," 28 Mar. 2021 On Aleksander Barkov’s goal, Philipp Kurashev and Boqvist were trying to clear the puck out of the zone, but Barkov collected his own rebound for a goal. Phil Thompson, chicagotribune.com, "5 takeaways from the Chicago Blackhawks’ 4-2 loss to the Florida Panthers, including Anthony Duclair’s untimely comeback and the Dominik Kubalik-Brandon Hagel combination," 14 Mar. 2021 Schakel had 15 points and nine rebounds, missing his first career double-double by a single rebound for the second time in the last three games in this arena. Mark Zeigler, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Aztecs reach another Mountain West final with 13th straight win," 12 Mar. 2021 Reopenings haven’t always translated into a complete rebound for restaurants. Heather Haddon, WSJ, "Covid-19-Closed Restaurants Are Reopening. Running Them Is Still a Battle.," 8 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'rebound.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of rebound

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a

Noun

1530, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for rebound

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French rebundir, from re- + Old French bondir to bound — more at bound entry 4

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Time Traveler for rebound

Time Traveler

The first known use of rebound was in the 14th century

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Statistics for rebound

Last Updated

5 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Rebound.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rebound. Accessed 12 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for rebound

rebound

verb

English Language Learners Definition of rebound

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to bounce back off something after hitting it
: to increase or improve after a recent decrease or decline
basketball : to catch the ball after a shot has missed going in the basket

rebound

noun

English Language Learners Definition of rebound (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of bouncing back after hitting something
: a ball, puck, etc., that bounces back after hitting something
basketball : the act of catching the ball after a shot has missed going in the basket

rebound

verb
re·​bound | \ ˌrē-ˈbau̇nd How to pronounce rebound (audio) \
rebounded; rebounding

Kids Definition of rebound

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to bounce back after hitting something
2 : to get over a disappointment
3 : to catch a basketball after a player has thrown it at the basket and has not scored a point

rebound

noun
re·​bound | \ ˈrē-ˌbau̇nd How to pronounce rebound (audio) \

Kids Definition of rebound (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the action of bouncing back after hitting something
2 : an immediate reaction to a loss or disappointment
3 : the act of catching a basketball after a player has thrown it at the basket and missed

rebound

noun
re·​bound | \ ˈrē-ˌbau̇nd How to pronounce rebound (audio) , ri-ˈ How to pronounce rebound (audio) \

Medical Definition of rebound

: a spontaneous reaction especially : a return to a previous state or condition following removal of a stimulus or cessation of treatment withdrawal of antihypertensive medication may lead to a rebound hypertensive crisis Emergency Medicine

Comments on rebound

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