proud

adjective
\ ˈprau̇d \

Definition of proud 

1 : feeling or showing pride: such as

a : having or displaying excessive self-esteem

b : much pleased : exultant

c : having proper self-respect

2a : marked by stateliness : magnificent

b : giving reason for pride : glorious the proudest moment in her life

3 : vigorous, spirited a proud steed

4 chiefly British : raised above a surrounding area a proud design on a stamp

Keep scrolling for more

Other words from proud

proudly adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for proud

proud, arrogant, haughty, lordly, insolent, overbearing, supercilious, disdainful mean showing scorn for inferiors. proud may suggest an assumed superiority or loftiness. too proud to take charity arrogant implies a claiming for oneself of more consideration or importance than is warranted. a conceited and arrogant executive haughty suggests a consciousness of superior birth or position. a haughty aristocrat lordly implies pomposity or an arrogant display of power. a lordly condescension insolent implies contemptuous haughtiness. ignored by an insolent waiter overbearing suggests a tyrannical manner or an intolerable insolence. an overbearing supervisor supercilious implies a cool, patronizing haughtiness. an aloof and supercilious manner disdainful suggests a more active and openly scornful superciliousness. disdainful of their social inferiors

Examples of proud in a Sentence

They are the proud parents of a hero. I was proud that I never gave in. She's the proud owner of a new car. Her proudest accomplishment was to finish school. He has a proud manner. a proud and opinionated person She's too proud to accept their charity.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web

One by one, the children smiled, bashful and proud. Amelia Nierenberg, BostonGlobe.com, "‘It feels nice to be with other people who have been through it:’ At Camp Kangaroo, grieving kids come together to talk, reflect, and play," 14 July 2018 His players were at his back, at the other end of the field, applauding their fans, commiserating with them, the mood proud but somber, stony faces and distant eyes. Rory Smith, New York Times, "Croatia Digs Deeper, Burying England’s World Cup Dreams," 12 July 2018 Not only does Fox News not try to hide it, management seems proud of the connection Hannity has as chief on-air cheerleader and informal adviser to Trump. David Zurawik, baltimoresun.com, "Trump's TV messaging machine not looking quite so mighty these days," 12 July 2018 The proud mom of one, 20, shared a sweet video of herself showering her 5-month-old daughter Stormi with kisses on Snapchat Wednesday night. Alexia Fernandez, PEOPLE.com, "Kylie Jenner Shares Sweet Kisses with Stormi Revealing Her 5-Month-Old Daughter's Pierced Ears," 12 July 2018 The band’s merging of hip-hop and guitar music was committed and proud in a way that subgenre peers like Deftones or Korn never really matched. Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic, "What Linkin Park Gave to Pop Music," 25 June 2018 One of the colleges my son visited was my alma mater, Haverford College (proud motto: ``Among The First In The Nation To Drop Football''). Dave Barry, miamiherald, "Classic '98: College bound," 22 June 2018 To see a small thin dog arrowing through the air at highway speeds, resistant to gravity, its forelegs out, its hind legs trailing, its thin proud snout straining forward, is to experience a brief moment of déjà vu. Christopher Solomon, Outside Online, "This Whippet Is One of the World's Great Athletes," 18 June 2018 Coming from an adoptive family with a military background, Tveidt was proud that his biological father served, too. Michael Katz, idahostatesman, "His mother left him in a box. 31 years later, this Boisean has reunited with his father.," 12 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'proud.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of proud

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for proud

Middle English, from Old English prūd, probably from Old French prod, prud, prou advantageous, just, wise, bold, from Late Latin prode advantage, advantageous, back-formation from Latin prodesse to be advantageous, from pro-, prod- for, in favor + esse to be — more at pro-, is

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about proud

Statistics for proud

Last Updated

10 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for proud

The first known use of proud was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for proud

proud

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of proud

: very happy and pleased because of something you have done, something you own, someone you know or are related to, etc. : feeling pride

: causing someone to feel very happy and pleased : causing a feeling of pride

: having or showing the attitude of people who think that they are better or more important than others : having or showing too much pride

proud

adjective
\ ˈprau̇d \
prouder; proudest

Kids Definition of proud

1 : having great self-respect or dignity He is too proud to beg.

2 : having a feeling of pleasure or satisfaction especially with a person's own achievements or with someone else's achievements : very pleased They were proud of their clever child.

3 : having or showing a feeling of being better than others : haughty

Other words from proud

proudly adverb

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on proud

What made you want to look up proud? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

alleviating pain or harshness

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Musical Words Quiz

  • gramophone
  • Which word describes a musical performance marked by the absence of instrumental accompaniment?
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Word Winder's CrossWinder

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!