prop

1 of 6

noun (1)

: something that props or sustains : support

prop

2 of 6

verb

propped; propping

transitive verb

1
a
: to support by placing something under or against
often used with up
b
: to support by placing against something
2
: sustain, strengthen
often used with up
a government propped up by the military

prop

3 of 6

noun (2)

1
: property sense 3
stage props
2
: something used in creating or enhancing a desired effect
buy books … as cultural props because they want to appear literateJohn Powers

prop

4 of 6

noun (3)

prop

5 of 6

abbreviation

prop-

6 of 6

combining form

: related to propionic acid
propane
propyl

Examples of prop in a Sentence

Verb She propped the rake against a tree. We propped the shed's roof with poles. The window was propped open.
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
There were groans and cries, and some patients propped themselves uncomfortably on benches, waiting to be treated. Jeffrey Moyo, New York Times, 13 Feb. 2024 Julia propped herself up on her elbow, facing Hendrickson. Elliot Ackerman, WIRED, 6 Feb. 2024 Inside the lobby of the beachy chic 18-room Sense Beach House on 4th and Ocean, a pair of stand-up paddleboards are propped against a wall, free for guests to grab and lug across the street for an impromptu ocean paddle. Miami Staff, Miami Herald, 30 Jan. 2024 At the tender age of 4, my arms were covered with lace gloves draping over my legs, propped for a camera. Laila Annmarie Stevens, Parents, 15 Jan. 2024 Mark Kelly Give the president’s son props for theater. William McGurn, WSJ, 8 Jan. 2024 Carlino gave the 6-foot-2 MacKenzie props for spearheading the defensive effort. Don Norcross, San Diego Union-Tribune, 24 Dec. 2023 The best way to prop the door open to her trust is to rid yourself of any trace of defensiveness about your past. Carolyn Hax, Washington Post, 26 Jan. 2024 The hospital’s single baby-warming crib was discovered, during a birth, to be missing a wheel; a nurse had to prop it up with her feet to prevent the newborn from falling out while the doctor received obstetrics counsel over the phone from a specialist in Austin. Stephania Taladrid, The New Yorker, 8 Jan. 2024
Noun
There are also several props that detail the businesses and streets of the city. Rob Wieland, Forbes, 23 Feb. 2024 Twelve jurors – seven men and five women – will now decide whether 26-year-old Gutierrez Reed, who was also the film’s key props assistant, is responsible for the killing. Christina Maxouris, CNN, 22 Feb. 2024 She was also scolded for devoting too much time to handling weapons, neglecting some of the duties of her secondary role as prop assistant. Meg James, Los Angeles Times, 21 Feb. 2024 There are props and buildings still standing, including a small museum with memorabilia and photographs, but things like the dock have fallen into disrepair. Jordi Lippe, Travel + Leisure, 16 Feb. 2024 As a result, only the minority was paid out on the third-most-popular novelty prop offered by BetMGM. Richard Morin, USA TODAY, 12 Feb. 2024 Scenic design, Frank J. Oliva; sound, Justin Schmitz; props, Luke Hartwood; costumes, Rodrigo Muñoz; lighting and projections, Hailey LaRoe. Heidi Pérez-Moreno, Washington Post, 12 Feb. 2024 Other prop bets include whether pop superstar Taylor Swift, girlfriend of Kansas City Chiefs tight end Travis Kelce, will be caught on camera wearing a foam finger. Faris Tanyos, CBS News, 11 Feb. 2024 Speaking with correspondent Dave Karger at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival's Virtuosos Awards on Saturday, the 39-year-old Barbie actress opened up about a moment when Hanks, 67, gave her props for her recent performance. Brenton Blanchet, Peoplemag, 11 Feb. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'prop.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun (1)

Middle English proppe, from Middle Dutch, stopper; akin to Middle Low German proppe stopper

Combining form

International Scientific Vocabulary, from propionic (acid)

First Known Use

Noun (1)

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1507, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun (2)

1841, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (3)

1914, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of prop was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near prop

Cite this Entry

“Prop.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/prop. Accessed 4 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

prop

1 of 4 noun
: something that props or supports

prop

2 of 4 verb
propped; propping
1
a
: to hold up or keep from falling or slipping by placing a support under or against
prop up a broken chair
b
: to support by placing against something
propped the rake against a tree
2
: to give help, encouragement, or support to
propped up by his faith in times of crisis

prop

3 of 4 noun

prop

4 of 4 noun

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