predict

verb
pre·​dict | \ pri-ˈdikt How to pronounce predict (audio) \
predicted; predicting; predicts

Definition of predict

transitive verb

: to declare or indicate in advance especially : foretell on the basis of observation, experience, or scientific reason

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Other Words from predict

predictor \ pri-​ˈdik-​tər How to pronounce predict (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for predict

foretell, predict, forecast, prophesy, prognosticate mean to tell beforehand. foretell applies to the telling of the coming of a future event by any procedure or any source of information. seers foretold the calamity predict commonly implies inference from facts or accepted laws of nature. astronomers predicted an eclipse forecast adds the implication of anticipating eventualities and differs from predict in being usually concerned with probabilities rather than certainties. forecast snow prophesy connotes inspired or mystic knowledge of the future especially as the fulfilling of divine threats or promises. prophesying a new messiah prognosticate is used less often than the other words; it may suggest learned or skilled interpretation, but more often it is simply a colorful substitute for predict or prophesy. prognosticating the future

Examples of predict in a Sentence

All the local forecasters are predicting rain for this afternoon. She claims that she can predict future events. It's hard to predict how the election will turn out. Many people predicted that the store would fail, but it has done very well. Sales are predicted to be the same as last year.
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Recent Examples on the Web Any number of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) put Mercedes at the forefront of safety, with multiple systems that activate, evade, and even predict. Robert Ross, Robb Report, "Drive Review: Why These Two Mercedes SUVs Belong in the Same Garage," 1 Apr. 2021 While many economists predict a boom this summer as most Americans get vaccinated and start traveling and dining again, there are still likely to be people left behind. Washington Post, "5 key takeaways from Biden’s $2 trillion infrastructure plan," 31 Mar. 2021 While many economists predict a boom this summer as most Americans get vaccinated and start traveling and dining again, there are likely to be people left behind. Author: Heather Long, Anchorage Daily News, "5 key takeaways from Biden’s $2 trillion infrastructure plan," 31 Mar. 2021 While the preseason polls may not have been as successful, teams' finishes in their conference standings should have helped predict the Sweet 16. Erick Smith, USA TODAY, "Where the Sweet 16 teams in the men's NCAA Tournament were predicted to finish in their conferences," 27 Mar. 2021 The data collected in this project, run by the University of the Philippines at Los Baños, will be used to develop models that might help predict—and possibly avoid—future pandemics similar to COVID-19. Alan Taylor, The Atlantic, "Studying Bats With ‘Virus Hunters’ in the Philippines," 23 Mar. 2021 Forecasters say this new model does not predict more rain and snow than actually arrives, which its predecessor had a tendency to do. NBC News, "U.S. weather model upgraded to better forecast extreme events," 23 Mar. 2021 Forecasters say this new model does not predict more rain and snow than actually arrives, which its predecessor had a tendency to do. Seth Borenstein, Star Tribune, "US weather model upgraded to better forecast extreme events," 22 Mar. 2021 Other research has suggested however that a more fair and balanced score on the IAT does not predict the kind of changes that would precipitate better hiring, including, promoting and communication across gender, racial and ethnic diversities. Nancy Doyle, Forbes, "Tackling Racial Discrimination: Can Unconscious Bias Training Create Real Change?," 21 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'predict.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of predict

1590, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for predict

Latin praedictus, past participle of praedicere, from prae- pre- + dicere to say — more at diction

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Time Traveler for predict

Time Traveler

The first known use of predict was in 1590

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Statistics for predict

Last Updated

5 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Predict.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/predict. Accessed 13 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for predict

predict

verb

English Language Learners Definition of predict

: to say that (something) will or might happen in the future

predict

verb
pre·​dict | \ pri-ˈdikt How to pronounce predict (audio) \
predicted; predicting

Kids Definition of predict

: to say that (something) will or might happen in the future predict the weather

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Comments on predict

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