parsimonious

adjective
par·​si·​mo·​ni·​ous | \ ˌpär-sə-ˈmō-nē-əs How to pronounce parsimonious (audio) \

Definition of parsimonious

1 : exhibiting or marked by parsimony especially : frugal to the point of stinginess

Other Words from parsimonious

parsimoniously adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for parsimonious

stingy, close, niggardly, parsimonious, penurious, miserly mean being unwilling or showing unwillingness to share with others. stingy implies a marked lack of generosity. a stingy child, not given to sharing close suggests keeping a tight grip on one's money and possessions. folks who are very close when charity calls niggardly implies giving or spending the very smallest amount possible. the niggardly amount budgeted for the town library parsimonious suggests a frugality so extreme as to lead to stinginess. a parsimonious lifestyle notably lacking in luxuries penurious implies niggardliness that gives an appearance of actual poverty. the penurious eccentric bequeathed a fortune miserly suggests a sordid avariciousness and a morbid pleasure in hoarding. a miserly couple devoid of social conscience

Did you know?

English isn't stingy when it comes to synonyms of parsimonious. Stingy, close, penurious, and miserly are a few terms that, like parsimonious, suggest an unwillingness to share with others. Stingy implies a marked lack of generosity, whereas close suggests keeping a tight grip on one's money and possessions. Penurious implies frugality that gives an appearance of actual poverty, and miserly suggests avariciousness and a morbid pleasure in hoarding. Parsimonious usually suggests an extreme frugality that borders on stinginess.

Examples of parsimonious in a Sentence

A society that is parsimonious in its personal charity (in terms of both time and money) will require more government welfare. — William J. Bennett, The Death of Outrage, 1998 Their merchant princes were supposed to be parsimonious and austere: fustian in apparel and coarse in diet. — Simon Schama, The Embarrassment of Riches, 1988 With saints, Dante is apathetic. They are written with a dry pen, and parsimonious vision. — Robert Lowell, Collected Prose, 1987 a parsimonious woman who insists that charity begins—and ends—at home
Recent Examples on the Web The string of modest contracts left them vulnerable to critics who felt Bloom had the Sox behaving more like parsimonious Tampa Bay than a team with one of the largest revenue streams — and one of the largest payrolls — in the game. Alex Speier, BostonGlobe.com, 6 Apr. 2022 There is a parsimonious version of the defense of free speech that holds that the only thing that Americans should worry about is infringement by the state. Charles C. W. Cooke, National Review, 10 Feb. 2022 The centre, which should be transferring part of its tax revenues or borrowing and passing it on to states, given the dire emergency, has been parsimonious in sharing resources. Rajrishi Singhal, Quartz, 26 Jan. 2022 Scottish and, even at those comparatively generous latitudes, coping with parsimonious winter daylight is a challenge for most, and impossible for some. Travel, 29 Dec. 2021 By comparison, the Philippines’ near neighbors are more parsimonious: Thailand’s consumption rate is 53%, and Indonesia’s 59%, according to the most recent data by the World Bank. Aurora Almendral, Quartz, 25 Nov. 2021 This blueprint, called a schema, keeps data entry reliable, search efficient, and the system parsimonious. Rida Qadri, Wired, 11 Nov. 2021 Manchester City, Chelsea and Manchester United have spent a lot, and therefore their prospects are brighter than the (comparatively parsimonious) Liverpool. New York Times, 20 Aug. 2021 But these days, the Daily News, owned by the parsimonious Tribune Publishing Company, which itself was just devoured by a hedge fund, is a shadow of its former self. Walter Shapiro, The New Republic, 28 May 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'parsimonious.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of parsimonious

1598, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for parsimonious

parsimony + -ous

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The first known use of parsimonious was in 1598

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Dictionary Entries Near parsimonious

parsil

parsimonious

parsimoniousness

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Last Updated

30 Apr 2022

Cite this Entry

“Parsimonious.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/parsimonious. Accessed 22 May. 2022.

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