move

verb
\ ˈmüv How to pronounce move (audio) \
moved; moving

Definition of move

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a(1) : to go or pass to another place or in a certain direction with a continuous motion moved into the shade
(2) : to proceed toward a certain state or condition moving up the executive ladder
(3) : to become transferred during play checkers move along diagonally adjacent squares
(4) : to keep pace moving with the times
b : to start away from some point or place : depart It was getting late and I thought it was time to be moving.
c : to change one's residence or location decided to move to the city
2 : to carry on one's life or activities in a specified environment moves in the best circles
3 : to change position or posture : stir ordered him not to move
4 : to take action : act The time has come to make up your mind and move.
5a : to begin operating or functioning or working in a usual way pushed a button and the machine began moving
b : to show marked activity after a lull things really began to move
c : to move a piece (as in chess or checkers) during one's turn
6 : to make a formal request, application, or appeal moved that the meeting adjourn
7 : to change hands by being sold or rented goods that moved slowly
8 of the bowels : evacuate

transitive verb

1a(1) : to change the place or position of moved the chair to a different part of the room
(2) : to dislodge or displace from a fixed position : budge The knife had sunk deeply into the wood and couldn't be moved.
b : to transfer (something, such as a piece in chess) from one position to another moved the bishop to take the knight
2a(1) : to cause to go or pass from one place to another with a continuous motion move the flag slowly up and down
(2) : to cause to advance moved the troops closer to the enemy
b : to cause to operate or function : actuate this button moves the whole machine
c : to put into activity or rouse up from inactivity news that moved them from their torpor
3 : to cause to change position or posture moved his lips but not a sound was heard
4 : to prompt or rouse to the doing of something : persuade the report moved us to take action
5a : to stir the emotions, feelings, or passions of deeply moved by such kindness
b : to affect in such a way as to lead to an indicated show of emotion the story moved her to tears
6a obsolete : beg
b : to make a formal application to
7 : to propose formally in a deliberative assembly moved the adjournment motion
8 : to cause (the bowels) to void
9 : to cause to change hands through sale or rent The salesman moved three cars today.
move house
British : to change one's residence

move

noun

Definition of move (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the act of moving a piece (as in chess)
b : the turn of a player to move
2a : a step taken especially to gain an objective : maneuver a move to end the dispute retiring early was a smart move
b : the action of moving from a motionless position
c : one of a pattern of dance steps
d : a change of residence or location
e : an agile or deceptive action especially in sports
on the move
1 : in a state of moving about from place to place
2 : in a state of moving ahead or making progress said that civilization is always on the move

Choose the Right Synonym for move

Verb

move, actuate, drive, impel mean to set or keep in motion. move is very general and implies no more than the fact of changing position. moved the furniture actuate stresses transmission of power so as to work or set in motion. turbines actuated by waterpower drive implies imparting forward and continuous motion and often stresses the effect rather than the impetus. a ship driven aground by hurricane winds impel is usually figurative and suggests a great motivating impetus. a candidate impelled by ambition

Examples of move in a Sentence

Verb He moved the chair closer to the table. It may be necessary to move the patient to intensive care. The breeze moved the branches of the trees. The branches moved gently in the breeze. She was unable to move her legs. She was so frightened that she could hardly move. I moved over so that she could sit next to me. We moved into the shade. The police were moving through the crowd telling people to move toward the exit. We could hear someone moving around upstairs. Noun He made a sudden move that scared away the squirrel. an athlete who has some good moves The policeman warned him not to make any false moves. He was afraid to make a move. No one is sure what his next move will be. He's preparing for his move to California. See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The launches contribute to a record level of missile testing this year that is intended to move Pyongyang closer to being acknowledged as a full-fledged nuclear power. Chris Megerian, USA TODAY, 29 Sep. 2022 It was expected to move across the Carolinas this weekend. Nelson Oliveira, CBS News, 29 Sep. 2022 DeSantis has thanked the administration for the resources provided so far, but said Thursday the state expects more disaster declarations as the storm continues to move across the state. Alexandra Hutzler, ABC News, 29 Sep. 2022 In Wednesday's intervention, the bank only bought £1 billion in bonds, out of an available offer for £5 billion, which suggested a limited amount of firepower was required to move markets. Chelsey Dulaney, WSJ, 29 Sep. 2022 Eventually, Proctor saved up enough money to move out, but between coming up with a housing payment on short notice and paying for a moving truck as well as the monthly storage for his personal belongings, the cost continued to overwhelm him. Kaitlyn Koterbski, Fortune, 29 Sep. 2022 The launches contribute to a record level of missile testing this year that is intended to move North Korea closer to being acknowledged as a full-fledged nuclear power. Chris Megerian, BostonGlobe.com, 29 Sep. 2022 The storm was expected to move over central Florida Wednesday night and this morning and emerge over the western Atlantic by later today as a tropical storm with maximum sustained winds around 65 mph. Arkansas Online, 29 Sep. 2022 Ian has weakened to a tropical storm, and was about to move back over water as of Thursday morning. Leigh Morgan, al, 29 Sep. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The move would also attract an immense retaliation from Nato. Sophie Mellor, Fortune, 30 Sep. 2022 The move came after a Warner Bros. Discovery merger that saw many executives depart from the company following an internal restructure. Charles Trepany, USA TODAY, 30 Sep. 2022 But Brnovich’s move and several other lawsuits filed this week have put that relief in jeopardy. Alison Steinbach, The Arizona Republic, 30 Sep. 2022 The move will bring the company’s hazy IPAs and surprising smoothie beers to the Bay Area. Mario Cortez, San Francisco Chronicle, 30 Sep. 2022 Ukraine responded to the Russian move with a swift show of defiance, declaring that Moscow’s attempted territorial seizures in the country’s south and east would not stand. Eli Stokols, Los Angeles Times, 30 Sep. 2022 The move appeared to be emulated by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis of Florida, who claimed responsibility for flying a group of migrants from Texas to Martha's Vineyard earlier this month. Jessie Dimartino, ABC News, 30 Sep. 2022 The drug, known as Relyvrio, has been shown to slow the progression of ALS – which causes muscles to weaken, eventually affecting the ability to speak, swallow, move and breathe. Alexandra Meeks, CNN, 30 Sep. 2022 Tim Bradley, interim executive director at the Chicago Area Runners Association, said the last-minute move to shorten the course was unusual for such a big race. Madeline Buckley, Chicago Tribune, 30 Sep. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'move.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of move

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a(1)

Noun

1656, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for move

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French mover, moveir, from Latin movēre; probably akin to Sanskrit mīvati he moves, pushes

Noun

derivative of move entry 1

Learn More About move

Time Traveler for move

Time Traveler

The first known use of move was in the 13th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near move

movable type

move

move ahead/along

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for move

Last Updated

1 Oct 2022

Cite this Entry

“Move.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/move. Accessed 4 Oct. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for move

move

verb
\ ˈmüv How to pronounce move (audio) \
moved; moving

Kids Definition of move

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to go from one place to another Let's move into the shade.
2 : to change the place or position of : shift Move your chair closer.
3 : to set in motion Come on, move your feet.
4 : to cause to act : persuade Your speech moved me to change my opinion.
5 : to affect the feelings of The sad story moved me to tears.
6 : to change position Stop moving until I finish cutting your hair.
7 : to change residence We moved to Illinois.
8 : to suggest according to the rules in a meeting I move to adjourn.

move

noun

Kids Definition of move (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the action of changing position, place, or residence a sudden move We're excited about our move to a new state.
2 : the act of moving a piece in a game
3 : the turn of a player to move It's your move.
4 : an action taken to accomplish something a career move

move

verb
\ ˈmüv How to pronounce move (audio) \
moved; moving

Medical Definition of move

intransitive verb

1 : to go or pass from one place to another
2 of the bowels : to eject fecal matter : evacuate

transitive verb

1 : to change the place or position of
2 : to cause (the bowels) to void

move

verb
moved; moving

Legal Definition of move

intransitive verb

: to make a motion moved to seize the property

transitive verb

: to request (a court) by means of a motion moved the court to vacate the order

More from Merriam-Webster on move

Nglish: Translation of move for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of move for Arabic Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Commonly Confused Words Quiz

  • vector image of a face with thought expression
  • I went to the ______ store to buy a birthday card.
Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!