mistrust

noun
mis·​trust | \ ˌmis-ˈtrəst How to pronounce mistrust (audio) \

Definition of mistrust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a lack of confidence : distrust

mistrust

verb
mistrusted; mistrusting; mistrusts

Definition of mistrust (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to have no trust or confidence in : suspect mistrusted his neighbors
2 : to doubt the truth, validity, or effectiveness of mistrusted his own judgment
3 : surmise your mind mistrusted there was something wrong— Robert Frost

intransitive verb

: to be suspicious

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Other Words from mistrust

Noun

mistrustful \ ˌmis-​ˈtrəst-​fəl How to pronounce mistrustful (audio) \ adjective
mistrustfully \ ˌmis-​ˈtrəst-​fə-​lē How to pronounce mistrustfully (audio) \ adverb
mistrustfulness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for mistrust

Noun

uncertainty, doubt, dubiety, skepticism, suspicion, mistrust mean lack of sureness about someone or something. uncertainty may range from a falling short of certainty to an almost complete lack of conviction or knowledge especially about an outcome or result. assumed the role of manager without hesitation or uncertainty doubt suggests both uncertainty and inability to make a decision. plagued by doubts as to what to do dubiety stresses a wavering between conclusions. felt some dubiety about its practicality skepticism implies unwillingness to believe without conclusive evidence. an economic forecast greeted with skepticism suspicion stresses lack of faith in the truth, reality, fairness, or reliability of something or someone. regarded the stranger with suspicion mistrust implies a genuine doubt based upon suspicion. had a great mistrust of doctors

Examples of mistrust in a Sentence

Noun She has a strong mistrust of politicians. had an unfortunate mistrust of doctors, so her medical condition was allowed to worsen Verb I was starting to mistrust my own judgment. a recluse who mistrusts her neighbors and stays in her house all day
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Europe's timely rollout of 5G is being threatened by the sabotage of new infrastructure and other expressions of mistrust, more than half the EU's countries warned Monday. David Meyer, Fortune, "Anti-5G saboteurs raise alarm across Europe," 19 Oct. 2020 Growing groups of Utah residents are skeptical of coronavirus tests or unwilling to get them, however, citing mistrust of government and fears of shutting down schools after a positive result. Leia Larsen, The Salt Lake Tribune, "Salt Lake County mayor candidates battle over pandemic response, spending and future recovery," 16 Oct. 2020 But ongoing military offensives and deep-seated mistrust between the warring sides have repeatedly caused agreements to crumble. Ahmed Al-haj And Isabel Debre, Star Tribune, "Yemen's rival sides complete war's largest prisoner exchange," 16 Oct. 2020 Deep mistrust on every issue has scuttled international peace efforts in Yemen. Sune Engel Rasmussen And Stephen Kalin, WSJ, "Decaying Yemen Oil Tanker at Risk of Spilling into Red Sea," 2 Oct. 2020 But deep mistrust and nationalism, coupled with tens of thousands of troops now arrayed along the remote frontier, make that challenging. Ann Scott Tyson, The Christian Science Monitor, "Himalayan pullback: The tense history of India-China border," 14 Sep. 2020 Some members of the Orthodox community also have a mistrust of secular authorities, according to Jonathan Zenilman, an infectious disease professor at Johns Hopkins University who was educated at a religious Jewish school. Paul Berger And Katie Honan, WSJ, "Religious Groups Sue to Block New Lockdown Restrictions in Parts of New York Seeing Covid-19 Surges," 8 Oct. 2020 Under the stress of crisis, these fractures of doubt can become chasms of mistrust. Aj Willingham, CNN, "How the pandemic and politics gave us a golden age of conspiracy theories," 3 Oct. 2020 Yet the sources of mistrust of Covid-19 vaccine trials aren’t just sepia-toned. Eric Boodman, STAT, "Among people of color asked to join Covid-19 vaccine trials, worries about inequities run deep," 25 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Javellana had already grown to mistrust the criminal justice system in south Florida. Sam Adler-bell, The New Republic, "How Police Unions Bully Politicians," 20 Oct. 2020 Some communities mistrust the health care system and others lack transportation or insurance. Hallie Miller, baltimoresun.com, "Many Marylanders are rushing to get a flu shot — and worried state health officials want the rest of us to join them," 9 Oct. 2020 And going high means unlocking the shackles of lies and mistrust with the only thing that can truly set us free: the cold hard truth. Jeanine Santucci, USA TODAY, "Read Michelle Obama's full keynote speech at the Democratic National Convention," 18 Aug. 2020 For every helpful medical news clip about Covid-19, the platforms host dozens of videos coaxing viewers to mistrust medical experts or vaccinations. Siva Vaidhyanathan, Wired, "The Dangers of Seeing the World Through Ubiquitous Video," 18 Aug. 2020 To not offer outside counseling would cause people to mistrust the university and dissuade future reports, the regents argued, according to sources. David Jesse, Detroit Free Press, "U-M regents had to push president for outside counseling for provost survivors, sources say," 4 Aug. 2020 Some families lack Internet connections and reliable transportation, mistrust the government based on their past, and work in large, congested spaces where coronavirus spreads more easily. oregonlive, "‘It’s a retraumatizing kind of experience:’ How COVID-19 is affecting refugee communities in Multnomah County," 1 July 2020 But Russian observers of the industry continue to mistrust these official statements. Eric Berger, Ars Technica, "Russia’s replacement for the Proton rocket costs way too much," 29 June 2020 That only fuels further mistrust in people already skeptical of science. Scottie Andrew, CNN, "America's response to the coronavirus is the most American thing ever," 19 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'mistrust.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of mistrust

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

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Time Traveler for mistrust

Time Traveler

The first known use of mistrust was in the 14th century

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Statistics for mistrust

Last Updated

27 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Mistrust.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mistrust. Accessed 30 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for mistrust

mistrust

noun
How to pronounce mistrust (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of mistrust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: lack of trust or confidence : a feeling that someone is not honest and cannot be trusted

mistrust

verb

English Language Learners Definition of mistrust (Entry 2 of 2)

: to have no trust or confidence in (someone or something)

mistrust

noun
mis·​trust | \ mis-ˈtrəst How to pronounce mistrust (audio) \

Kids Definition of mistrust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

mistrust

verb
mistrusted; mistrusting

Kids Definition of mistrust (Entry 2 of 2)

2 : to lack confidence in They mistrust your abilities.

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