loot

noun
\ ˈlüt How to pronounce loot (audio) \

Definition of loot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : goods usually of considerable value taken in war : spoils The soldiers helped themselves to any loot that they could find.
2 : something held to resemble goods of value seized in war: such as
a : something appropriated illegally often by force or violence the thieves' loot
b : illicit gains by public officials
c : money would not … spend all that loot on her— Langston Hughes
3 : the action of looting general loot of church land— Hilaire Belloc

loot

verb
looted; looting; loots

Definition of loot (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to plunder or sack in war
b : to rob especially on a large scale and usually by violence or corruption
2 : to seize and carry away by force especially in war

intransitive verb

: to engage in robbing or plundering especially in war

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Other Words from loot

Verb

looter noun

Synonyms for loot

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for loot

Noun

spoil, plunder, booty, prize, loot mean something taken from another by force or craft. spoil, more commonly spoils, applies to what belongs by right or custom to the victor in war or political contest. the spoils of political victory plunder applies to what is taken not only in war but in robbery, banditry, grafting, or swindling. a bootlegger's plunder booty implies plunder to be shared among confederates. thieves dividing up their booty prize applies to spoils captured on the high seas or territorial waters of the enemy. the wartime right of seizing prizes at sea loot applies especially to what is taken from victims of a catastrophe. picked through the ruins for loot

Examples of loot in a Sentence

Noun After raiding the town, the soldiers helped themselves to any loot that they could find. The thieves got a lot of loot in the robbery. He made a lot of loot selling cars. Verb The soldiers were looting every house that they came to. Soldiers swept through the territory, looting, burning, and killing.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun As Wilkinson notes, Karl Richard Lepsius, an eminent Prussian Egyptologist, took ten camels’ worth of loot away from the Giza plateau but complained with no irony about the quarrying of monuments by local villagers. Ursula Lindsey, The New York Review of Books, 27 Apr. 2021 Large gangs launch choreographed raids on farms, washing their loot, packing them in boxes and hawking them in markets across the country. Alexandra Wexler, WSJ, 17 June 2021 The huge loot pool is not helped by the absurdly low drop rate. Paul Tassi, Forbes, 13 May 2021 Roland Garros has long had great loot, often too great on a sportswriter’s salary. New York Times, 12 June 2021 In three years’ time, Juniper believes that around 5% of worldwide gamers (230 million people) will buy loot boxes. Matt Gardner, Forbes, 3 June 2021 Today’s pirates sail the cyber seas searching for loot, by ransom or theft. Thomas Ayres, WSJ, 13 May 2021 After nearly a month since the issue started hitting players, Outriders is now starting to roll out gear restoration after inventory wipes cost players all their loot and wouldn’t even let many log in. Paul Tassi, Forbes, 6 May 2021 Back when Cha Oc Gia Huy was just a single, slender storefront in the Little Saigon neighborhood of Garden Grove, Calif., customers visiting from the East Coast would bring coolers into the shop to haul their loot back home. Washington Post, 5 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb One hundred years ago, on May 31, 1921, a White mob descended on the prosperous Black neighborhood known as Black Wall Street and proceeded to burn, loot and kill until hundreds were dead and 35 city blocks were destroyed. Kate Sullivan, CNN, 1 June 2021 It’s usually the case that many games in the looter genre don’t quite get their endgame loot right at launch, and Outriders is no exception. Paul Tassi, Forbes, 26 Apr. 2021 Zvonimir Jurlina of New York, who was also charged in the destruction, cheered on the stomping and encouraged the crowd to loot the media setup, prosecutors say. Katelyn Polantz, CNN, 1 July 2021 In 1933, the farmer hid the ancient skull inside a well, intending to keep it hidden from Japanese forces that occupied the city during World War II—fearing soldiers might loot it as a war treasure. Nicholas Reimann, Forbes, 25 June 2021 Firefighters discovered LaLaurie’s crimes in 1834, which prompted New Orleans citizens to loot the mansion. Bethy Squires, Vulture, 10 June 2021 Shoot and loot your way across an alien planet and gather thousands of different weapons along the way. Jess Grey, Wired, 13 June 2021 Soldiers went on to loot the kingdom’s riches, telling British authorities that the ivory alone would cover the cost of the mission. Washington Post, 10 May 2021 Brooklyn Center, the city where Wright died, has been roiled by four consecutive nights of unrest as rioters take to the streets, loot businesses and clash with law enforcement. Jake Dima, Washington Examiner, 14 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'loot.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of loot

Noun

circa 1788, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1845, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for loot

Noun and Verb

Hindi & Urdu lūṭ; akin to Sanskrit luṇṭati he plunders

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Dictionary Entries Near loot

loosey-goosey

loot

looten

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Statistics for loot

Last Updated

16 Jul 2021

Cite this Entry

“Loot.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/loot. Accessed 27 Jul. 2021.

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More Definitions for loot

loot

noun

English Language Learners Definition of loot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something that is stolen or taken by force

loot

verb

English Language Learners Definition of loot (Entry 2 of 2)

: to steal things from (a place, such as a store or house) during a war or after destruction has been caused by fire, rioting, etc.

loot

noun
\ ˈlüt How to pronounce loot (audio) \

Kids Definition of loot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something stolen or taken by force

loot

verb
looted; looting

Kids Definition of loot (Entry 2 of 2)

Other Words from loot

looter noun

loot

transitive verb

Legal Definition of loot

1 : to rob especially during or following a catastrophe (as war, riot, or natural disaster)
2 : to rob especially on a large scale and usually by violence or corruption

intransitive verb

: to engage in robbing especially after a catastrophe

Other Words from loot

looter noun

More from Merriam-Webster on loot

Nglish: Translation of loot for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of loot for Arabic Speakers

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