treasure

noun
trea·​sure | \ ˈtre-zhər How to pronounce treasure (audio) , ˈtrā-\

Definition of treasure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a(1) : wealth (such as money, jewels, or precious metals) stored up or hoarded buried treasure
(2) : wealth of any kind or in any form : riches
b : a store of money in reserve
2 : something of great worth or value also : a person esteemed as rare or precious
3 : a collection of precious things

treasure

verb
treasured; treasuring\ ˈtre-​zh(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce treasuring (audio) , ˈtrā-​ \

Definition of treasure (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to hold or keep as precious : cherish, prize she treasured those memories
2 : to collect and store up (something of value) for future use : hoard

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Synonyms & Antonyms for treasure

Synonyms: Noun

boast, credit, crown jewel, glory, honor, jewel, pride, trophy

Synonyms: Verb

appreciate, cherish, love, prize, value

Antonyms: Verb

disvalue

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Choose the Right Synonym for treasure

Verb

appreciate, value, prize, treasure, cherish mean to hold in high estimation. appreciate often connotes sufficient understanding to enjoy or admire a thing's excellence. appreciates fine wine value implies rating a thing highly for its intrinsic worth. values our friendship prize implies taking a deep pride in something one possesses. Americans prize their freedom treasure emphasizes jealously safeguarding something considered precious. a treasured memento cherish implies a special love and care for something. cherishes her children above all

Examples of treasure in a Sentence

Noun

a legend about the pirates' buried treasure Central Park is one of New York City's many treasures. Grandmother's nurse has been a real treasure.

Verb

He treasures that autographed baseball. My grandmother's ring is my most treasured possession.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

That was good news because many of the home’s small treasures — vintage glass door knobs, wall sconces — hadn’t been filched or damaged. Richard A. Marini, ExpressNews.com, "Historic Tobin Hill home renovation paired wheelchair accessibility with preservation," 6 Aug. 2019 Not long after Healy’s untouched archive of vintage Grateful Dead T-shirts was uncovered, singer-songwriter Maggie Rogers borrowed something even more rare from Healy’s long lost collection of treasures. Vogue, "Maggie Rogers’s Lollapalooza Look Is a Tie-Dye Tribute to the Grateful Dead," 5 Aug. 2019 The margarita-fueled party scene in Cabo San Lucas may claim the limelight, but the Mexican state of Baja California Sur has a wealth of natural and cultural treasures. Jenny Peters, National Geographic, "Baja California Sur: The ultimate road trip," 25 July 2019 Bogard has been working for weeks to pack up decades worth of nostalgic treasures, using a hydraulic lift to painstakingly remove delicate items from the ceiling and walls such the biplane models, Quarter Midget race cars and porcelain signs. Lisa Maria Garza, orlandosentinel.com, "Mount Dora Museum of Speed closed after years of showcasing classic cars, providing nostalgia," 13 July 2019 For two hours each night, the iconic rocket will grace the sides of the national treasure. Trisha Ahmed And Katherine Dillinger, CNN, "The Washington Monument will blast off in honor of Apollo 11," 9 July 2019 The ride includes a treasure hunt that uses touch screens inside the sub to interact with real sea life just outside the porthole. Amber Turpin, The Mercury News, "20 awesome things to do at Legoland," 21 July 2019 Picking through the bean stew that is a specialty of the French southwest, the Tour’s playground this week, is a bit like a treasure hunt. Washington Post, "Taste of the Tour: Piping-hot bean stew in summer? Bien sûr!," 18 July 2019 Shopping for your fave makeup products always feels a bit like a treasure hunt. Lauren Rearick, Teen Vogue, "Michael Kors Announced the Launch of New York City-Based Wonderlust Scavenger Hunt In Partnership With Gigi Hadid," 15 July 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

In the novel, Valerie grows up with a man-crazy mother who treasures her daughter’s mind but does not understand it. Katy Waldman, The New Yorker, "“Valerie” Is an Extraordinary Love Letter to a Radical Feminist," 1 Aug. 2019 Bardo treasured the football on display at his parents’ house, signed by Lorenzen's 1998 Bluebirds state championship team. Adam Turer, Cincinnati.com, "How Kentucky, Highlands football hero Jared Lorenzen inspired players and fans," 10 July 2019 Renovation complete Rest assured that Parkway Place treasures the independence of its residents, and those residents truly appreciate it. Houston Chronicle, "Parkway Place: Independence is an aspiration," 19 July 2019 Because these legends have been in our lives for so long, their very appearance onstage calls forth memories richly worth treasuring. Howard Reich, chicagotribune.com, "As Tony Bennett approaches 93, let's hear it for the elders," 13 June 2019 It’s very much about the two main characters forging their own paths and identities while still treasuring friendship. Gabe Bergado, Teen Vogue, "Billie Lourd Wishes She Had a Movie Like "Booksmart" When She Was in High School," 20 May 2019 And if there aren’t actual pots of gold, there are lamés and garments heavy with elaborate metallic beading, all done by hand in India, to covet and treasure. Vogue, "For Libertine’s Johnson Hartig, Home Is Where the Art Is," 26 Apr. 2019 Your location may be placed on a map that will be available to treasure hunters. cleveland.com, "Vintage MarketPlace attracts visitors from afar: Olmsted Dates and Data," 6 July 2019 Sports card collectors treasure pristine collectables without damage or scuffs. Mike Rogoway, oregonlive.com, "Lake Oswego auctioneer enmeshed in sports card scandal," 3 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'treasure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of treasure

Noun

12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for treasure

Noun

Middle English tresor, from Anglo-French, from Latin thesaurus — more at thesaurus

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Learn More about treasure

Statistics for treasure

Last Updated

9 Aug 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for treasure

The first known use of treasure was in the 12th century

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More Definitions for treasure

treasure

noun

English Language Learners Definition of treasure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something valuable (such as money, jewels, gold, or silver) that is hidden or kept in a safe place
: something that is very special, important, or valuable
: a person who is greatly loved or valued especially because of being very helpful

treasure

verb

English Language Learners Definition of treasure (Entry 2 of 2)

: to value (something) very much

treasure

noun
trea·​sure | \ ˈtre-zhər How to pronounce treasure (audio) \

Kids Definition of treasure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : wealth (as money or jewels) stored up or held in reserve
2 : something of great value The park is one of the city's treasures.

treasure

verb
treasured; treasuring

Kids Definition of treasure (Entry 2 of 2)

: to treat as precious : cherish Ramona, who liked to draw … treasured the new eraser …— Beverly Cleary, Ramona Quimby

treasure

noun
trea·​sure

Legal Definition of treasure

: personal property that is hidden in something else for an extended period and whose owner cannot be determined

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More from Merriam-Webster on treasure

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with treasure

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for treasure

Spanish Central: Translation of treasure

Nglish: Translation of treasure for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of treasure for Arabic Speakers

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