laurel

noun
lau·​rel | \ ˈlȯr-əl How to pronounce laurel (audio) , ˈlär- \

Definition of laurel

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : an evergreen shrub or tree (Laurus nobilis of the family Lauraceae, the laurel family) of southern Europe with small yellow flowers, fruits that are ovoid blackish berries, and evergreen foliage once used by the ancient Greeks to crown victors in the Pythian games

called also bay, sweet bay

2 : a tree or shrub that resembles the true laurel especially : mountain laurel
3a : a crown of laurel awarded as an honor
b : a recognition of achievement : honor usually used in plural

laurel

verb
laureled or laurelled; laureling or laurelling

Definition of laurel (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

: to deck or crown with laurel

Laurel

biographical name
Lau·​rel | \ ˈlȯr-əl How to pronounce Laurel (audio) , ˈlär- \

Definition of Laurel (Entry 3 of 3)

Stan 1890–1965 born Arthur Stanley Jefferson British comic actor in U.S.

Illustration of laurel

Illustration of laurel

Noun

laurel 1

In the meaning defined above

Examples of laurel in a Sentence

Noun They enjoyed the laurels of their military victory. The player earned his laurels from years of hard work.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The rug also includes a depiction of a garland made of laurel leaves, a tie-in to the First Lady’s first name, Laura. Mary Elizabeth Andriotis, House Beautiful, "A Look at the Most Impressive—and Fascinating—White House Interiors Throughout History," 14 Jan. 2021 If the Tidal Basin were planted with cherry laurel instead of cherry trees, well, there would be no tour buses flocking to the Cherry Laurel Festival. Washington Post, "Winter wonders: Conifers revive the sleeping garden. But remember, less is more.," 2 Dec. 2020 Handcrafted from noble red fir, western red cedar and laurel, this fresh centerpiece from L.L.Bean also mixes in pinecones, golden berry sprays, and matte gold and ivory ornament balls. Courtney Thompson, CNN Underscored, "We found the prettiest Christmas decorations for your home this winter," 1 Dec. 2020 With its smooth, lustrous leaves, Osmanthus fragrans could almost be mistaken for a laurel and can ultimately grow to 30 feet if left to its own devices. oregonlive, "These plants will bring fall color and fragrance to Oregon gardens," 6 Nov. 2020 Even when a laurel tree’s thin bark gets burned, the underground root system can send of new shoots as early as four to six weeks after a fire, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Tara Duggan, SFChronicle.com, "Bay Area farm loses 100,000 bay trees in fire — but it's not the end for this spice company," 8 Sep. 2020 My laurel hedge is 20 feet high by 5 feet wide by 100 feet long. oregonlive, "Ask an expert: What sort of pruning is needed to reshape a laurel hedge?," 23 Aug. 2020 Avoid formulas made with mineral oil, which can lead to breakouts; sodium laurel sulfate, which can irritate skin around the eyes and has been linked to cancer and neurotoxicity; and diazolidinyl urea, which can cause red, irritated and itchy eyes. Shanon Maglente, Good Housekeeping, "How to Remove Stubborn Waterproof Mascara Without Losing Eyelashes," 3 June 2020 The style comes in chic, neutral colors like laurel olive, heather gray, and navy. Lindsey Olander, Condé Nast Traveler, "The Best Bike Shorts to Wear This Summer," 15 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'laurel.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of laurel

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1631, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for laurel

Noun

Middle English lorel, in part from Medieval Latin laureola spurge laurel (from Latin, laurel sprig), in part modification of Anglo-French lorer, from Old French lor laurel, from Latin laurus

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Time Traveler for laurel

Time Traveler

The first known use of laurel was in the 14th century

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Statistics for laurel

Last Updated

22 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Laurel.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/laurel. Accessed 22 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for laurel

laurel

noun
How to pronounce Laurel (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of laurel

: an evergreen tree or bush with shiny pointed leaves
: honor or fame given for some achievement

laurel

noun
lau·​rel | \ ˈlȯr-əl How to pronounce laurel (audio) \

Kids Definition of laurel

1 : a small evergreen European tree with shiny pointed leaves used in ancient times to crown victors (as in sports)
2 : a tree or shrub (as the American mountain laurel ) that resembles the European laurel
3 : a crown of laurel used as a mark of honor

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Comments on laurel

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