injunction

noun
in·​junc·​tion | \ in-ˈjəŋ(k)-shən How to pronounce injunction (audio) \

Definition of injunction

1 : a writ granted by a court of equity whereby one is required to do or to refrain from doing a specified act
2 : the act or an instance of enjoining : order, admonition

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Other Words from injunction

injunctive \ in-​ˈjəŋ(k)-​tiv How to pronounce injunction (audio) \ adjective

Did You Know?

Injunction derives, via Anglo-French and Late Latin, from the Latin verb injungere, which in turn derives from jungere, meaning "to join." Like our verb enjoin, injungere means "to direct or impose by authoritative order or with urgent admonition." (Not surprisingly, enjoin is also a descendant of injungere.) Injunction has been around in English since at least the 15th century, when it began life as a word meaning "authoritative command." In the 16th century it developed a legal second sense applying to a court order. It has also been used as a synonym of conjunction, another jungere descendant meaning "union," but that sense is extremely rare.

Examples of injunction in a Sentence

The group has obtained an injunction to prevent the demolition of the building. in the cult there were injunctions for and against everything, as nothing was a matter of personal choice
Recent Examples on the Web The Court of Appeal temporarily blocked Heckman’s injunction in November pending an appeal. Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times, "State appeals court upholds Gov. Newsom’s emergency powers during pandemic," 5 May 2021 Baker County Circuit Court Judge Matt Shirtcliff in May 2020 granted a preliminary injunction for the plaintiffs, essentially giving them a pass on having to follow Brown’s executive orders until a higher court made a ruling. oregonlive, "COVID outbreak at Albany church highlights question of oversight," 2 May 2021 The next day, a federal judge named David Carter dropped a 110-page injunction requiring the city to offer housing to everyone in the downtown neighborhood of Skid Row by October. Alissa Walker, Curbed, "L.A. Built a Tiny-House Village for Homeless Residents, and Some Aren’t So Sure About It," 27 Apr. 2021 Contreras noted that the injunction hearing will likely happen in July or August. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Next chapter of FTC’s battle with Illumina to play out in San Diego," 21 Apr. 2021 Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, though, is appealing that injunction. Steve Bittenbender, Washington Examiner, "Kentucky Supreme Court to hear two cases involving COVID-19 orders," 20 Apr. 2021 The state Court of Appeals last week stayed Privett’s temporary injunction. From Usa Today Network And Wire Reports, USA TODAY, "Crowd record, ‘secret prom,’ demand drop: News from around our 50 states," 20 Apr. 2021 But soccer’s governing bodies are already concerned that any ban or injunction wouldn’t find much to build from in recent European law. Joshua Robinson, WSJ, "New Soccer Super League Moves to Head Off Bans and Legal Challenges," 19 Apr. 2021 Neither court imposed a nationwide injunction ordering the CDC to stop enforcing the moratorium beyond the plaintiffs in the cases. Joel Zinberg, National Review, "The CDC Extends Its Illegal, Ineffective Eviction Moratorium," 29 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'injunction.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of injunction

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for injunction

Middle English injunccion, from Anglo-French & Late Latin; Anglo-French enjunxion, from Late Latin injunction-, injunctio, from Latin injungere to enjoin — more at enjoin

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Time Traveler for injunction

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The first known use of injunction was in the 15th century

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Last Updated

8 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Injunction.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/injunction. Accessed 12 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for injunction

injunction

noun

English Language Learners Definition of injunction

law : an order from a court of law that says something must be done or must not be done

injunction

noun
in·​junc·​tion | \ in-ˈjəŋk-shən How to pronounce injunction (audio) \

Kids Definition of injunction

: a court order commanding or forbidding the doing of some act

injunction

noun
in·​junc·​tion | \ in-ˈjəŋk-shən How to pronounce injunction (audio) \

Legal Definition of injunction

: an equitable remedy in the form of a court order compelling a party to do or refrain from doing a specified act — compare cease-and-desist order at order sense 3b, damage, declaratory judgment at judgment sense 1a, mandamus, specific performance at performance, stay

Note: An injunction is available as a remedy for harm for which there is no adequate remedy at law. Thus it is used to prevent a future harmful action rather than to compensate for an injury that has already occurred, or to provide relief from harm for which an award of money damages is not a satisfactory solution or for which a monetary value is impossible to calculate. A defendant who violates an injunction is subject to penalty for contempt.

affirmative injunction
: an injunction requiring a positive act on the part of the defendant : mandatory injunction in this entry
final injunction
: permanent injunction in this entry
interlocutory injunction
: an injunction that orders the maintenance of the status quo between the parties prior to a final determination of the matter specifically : preliminary injunction in this entry
mandatory injunction
: an injunction that compels the defendant to do some positive act rather than simply to maintain the situation as it was when the action was brought — compare prohibitory injunction in this entry
permanent injunction
: an injunction imposed after a hearing and remaining in force at least until the defendant has complied with its provisions

called also final injunction, perpetual injunction

preliminary injunction
: an interlocutory injunction issued before a trial for purposes of preventing the defendant from acting in a way that will irreparably harm the plaintiff's ability to enforce his or her rights at the trial

called also temporary injunction

— compare temporary restraining order at order

Note: Before a preliminary injunction can be issued, there must be a hearing with prior notice to the defendant. Under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 65, the hearing and the trial may be consolidated.

prohibitory injunction
: an injunction that prohibits the defendant from taking a particular action and maintains the positions of the parties until there is a hearing to determine the matter in dispute
temporary injunction
: preliminary injunction in this entry

History and Etymology for injunction

Middle French injonction, from Late Latin injunction-, injunctio, from Latin injungere to enjoin, from in- in + jungere to join

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