directive

adjective
di·​rec·​tive | \ də-ˈrek-tiv How to pronounce directive (audio) , dī- \

Definition of directive

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : serving or intended to guide, govern, or influence a directive method
2 : serving to point direction specifically : directional sense 1b directive microphones
3 psychology : of or relating to psychotherapy or counseling in which the counselor introduces information, content, or attitudes not previously expressed by the client

directive

noun

Definition of directive (Entry 2 of 2)

: something that serves to direct, guide, and usually impel toward an action or goal especially, government : an authoritative order or instrument issued by a high-level body or official a presidential directive

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Examples of directive in a Sentence

Noun They received a written directive instructing them to develop new security measures. the company president regularly issues directives intended for all staff members
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective What followed was a flurry of directive fingers from shoppers helping guide officers to the location of all three fleeing perps. Kim Fu, The Mercury News, "Three Antioch residents nabbed in brazen liquor burglary attempt foiled by Vacaville police," 10 July 2019 Most intriguingly, the new app will take a more directive approach to making suggestions to drivers about where to go and what to do. Alexis C. Madrigal, The Atlantic, "3 Million Uber Drivers Are About to Get a New Boss," 10 Apr. 2018 Garcetti signed a directive two weeks ago prohibiting all city employees from using public resources to aide federal civil immigration actions. The Washington Post, The Denver Post, "Attorney General Sessions seeks greater role for Justice Department in immigration enforcement," 1 Apr. 2017 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The State Troopers Fraternal Association of New Jersey, along with other police unions, filed a lawsuit in state court challenging the attorney general’s directive. Joseph De Avila, WSJ, "Tri-State Area Police Unions Fight to Keep Disciplinary Records Private," 11 Oct. 2020 Polster agreed with the plaintiffs' argument that LaRose's directive places a burden on the rights of minority and low-income Ohioans. Jack Turman, CBS News, "Judge rules against Ohio election official's limits on drop boxes," 9 Oct. 2020 Somewhere in the midst of the visit, a lockdown directive was issued for New York. Joanne Kaufman, New York Times, "Love and the Lockdown," 2 Oct. 2020 That includes a directive to the Energy Department to issue guidance clarifying whether and how domestic critical minerals projects could apply for loan guarantees or other funding. Abby Smith, Washington Examiner, "Daily on Energy: Natural gas growth has driven emissions reductions but made it a target for environmentalists," 1 Oct. 2020 Last week, Polster heard nearly 15 hours of testimony and arguments stemming from LaRose’s directive Aug. 12 that permitted each county to have just one drop box at its board of elections. John Caniglia, cleveland, "Secretary of State allows Cuyahoga County Board of Elections to have staff members accept ballots off Chester Avenue," 30 Sep. 2020 The party is also pushing back against LaRose’s directive limiting each county to one absentee ballot drop box, in a case currently in appellate court. Jackie Borchardt, The Enquirer, "Judge rules against Ohio voter advocates, rejects changes to absentee ballot signature rules," 28 Sep. 2020 The governor’s directive cleared the way for all bars and any other businesses in Palm Beach County that were previously closed to reopen Friday. Marc Freeman, sun-sentinel.com, "Florida’s coronavirus numbers hold steady as state pushes ahead with reopenings," 26 Sep. 2020 In Michigan, a group of letter carriers did an end run around a supervisor’s directive to leave election mail behind, starting their routes late to sift through it. Washington Post, "Postal Service workers quietly resist DeJoy’s changes with eye on election," 25 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'directive.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of directive

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1902, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for directive

Adjective

see direct entry 1

Noun

see direct entry 1

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Time Traveler for directive

Time Traveler

The first known use of directive was in the 15th century

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Cite this Entry

“Directive.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/directive. Accessed 25 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for directive

directive

noun

English Language Learners Definition of directive

formal : an official order or instruction

directive

adjective
di·​rec·​tive | \ də-ˈrek-tiv, dī- How to pronounce directive (audio) \

Medical Definition of directive

: of or relating to psychotherapy in which the therapist introduces information, content, or attitudes not previously expressed by the client

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Comments on directive

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