elective

adjective
elec·​tive | \ i-ˈlek-tiv How to pronounce elective (audio) \

Definition of elective

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : chosen or filled by popular election an elective official
b : of or relating to election
c : based on the right or principle of election the presidency is an elective office
2a : permitting a choice : optional an elective course in school
b(1) : relating to, being, or involving a nonemergency medical procedure and especially surgery that is planned in advance and is not essential to the survival of the patient elective hip surgery elective tonsillectomy elective cosmetic procedures
(2) : offering or specializing in nonemergency medical procedures and especially surgery an elective surgical unit
(3) : relating to or being a patient receiving a nonemergency medical procedure elective orthopedic patients
3a : tending to operate on one substance rather than another elective absorption
b : favorably inclined to one more than to another : sympathetic an elective affinity

elective

noun

Definition of elective (Entry 2 of 2)

: an elective course or subject

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Other Words from elective

Adjective

electively adverb
electiveness noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for elective

Synonyms: Adjective

Antonyms: Adjective

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Examples of elective in a Sentence

Adjective He's never held an elective office. Plastic surgery is elective surgery. She took three elective courses last term. Noun She's taking several electives this year.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Buttigieg’s only experience in elective office was his two-term stint as mayor of South Bend, Ind., a city smaller than Antioch. Joe Garofoli, SFChronicle.com, "Pete Buttigieg endorsed by California Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis," 13 Feb. 2020 Rodriguez studied architecture at Rice University and had no desire to ever run for elective office. Gilbert Garcia, ExpressNews.com, "Podcast: Xochil Peña Rodriguez applies lessons from her former congressman father," 11 Feb. 2020 Morell and Farkas discuss the recent surge in congressional candidates with backgrounds in national security and the rigors of pursuing elective office. CBS News, "Transcript: Evelyn Farkas talks with Michael Morell on "Intelligence Matters"," 5 Feb. 2020 The State Board of Education on Friday gave preliminary approval to standards for districts to offer the course as an elective social studies class for high school students. Arnessa Garrett, Dallas News, "Biden’s lead among Texas voters grows, Iowa caucus snafu, impeachment trial winds down, Ellis becomes sanctuary ‘county’ for unborn," 4 Feb. 2020 There are additional fees for a few elective activities including horseback riding, scuba diving and some wood-shop projects. Chelsey Lewis, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "7 weeks of summer camp is rare in Wisconsin, but Red Arrow has continued the tradition for 100 years," 30 Jan. 2020 Meanwhile, students at Chugiak and Eagle River High get fewer elective opportunities than their counterparts in other Anchorage School District schools. Matt Tunseth, Anchorage Daily News, "Chugiak-Eagle River divided over proposal to merge high schools," 27 Nov. 2019 Going after spikes in the elective surgery cycle was key. John Diedrich, jsonline.com, "Some busy hospitals say they must turn away ambulances. Here's how one state banned the practice," 22 Nov. 2019 Combined with other conservative arguments about the executive branch, Trump and his supporters are effectively arguing for an elective monarchy. Matt Ford, The New Republic, "Donald Trump and the Absolute Power Presidency," 18 Nov. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Instead of focusing on health care or health-care management through electives in the second half of the two-year degree, when Johns Hopkins reboots its M.B.A. in the fall, the health-intensive track will start almost immediately, Mr. Triantis said. Patrick Thomas, WSJ, "Johns Hopkins University Reimagines the M.B.A.," 22 Jan. 2020 The main focus of social studies instruction in Massachusetts has been US or world history, though high schools have never stopped offering courses in government or politics at least as electives. BostonGlobe.com, "Webb Chappell for the Boston Globe," 2 Oct. 2019 The elective has been offered in some iteration at other Fairfax County Public Schools for years, but this is the first time it has been taught at McLean. Washington Post, "What does it take to combat intolerance? Students at a Virginia high school find out.," 10 Oct. 2019 With local electives not funded by the state - such as building two new schools instead of one and installing synthetic turf at the Charles McNulty Stadium at the high school - the cost of Finneytown’s building project comes to about $55.7 million. Jeanne Houck, Cincinnati.com, "Finneytown asks for assist from voters, state for two new schools," 4 Nov. 2019 Teachers Victoria Medlock and Justin Brantner said the class is a science elective for freshmen and sophomores and 88 students are enrolled this year. Allison Wood, cleveland.com, "Medina School Board hear about ‘crime scene,’ report card grades," 16 Sep. 2019 Spring Forest Middle School - A broadcast journalism elective will include videography, photography and editing. Houston Chronicle, "Spring Branch Education Foundation announces 2019 grants," 7 June 2019 This would allow students more opportunity for electives, honors courses, and credit recovery, and ideally attract more students to the campuses, Kimble said. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Vista schools at risk of financial problems, report warns," 6 Sep. 2019 The World Religions course will be an optional elective that covers Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and other popular world religions, officials said. Billy Kobin, The Courier-Journal, "Kentucky high school drops 'Bible Literacy' course over constitutional concerns," 9 Aug. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'elective.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of elective

Adjective

circa 1531, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1850, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for elective

Time Traveler

The first known use of elective was circa 1531

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Statistics for elective

Last Updated

26 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Elective.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/elective. Accessed 29 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for elective

elective

adjective
How to pronounce elective (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of elective

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: held by a person who is elected
: not medically necessary
chiefly US : not required in a particular course of study

elective

noun

English Language Learners Definition of elective (Entry 2 of 2)

US : a class that is not required in a particular course of study

elective

adjective
elec·​tive | \ i-ˈlek-tiv How to pronounce elective (audio) \

Kids Definition of elective

: chosen or filled by election an elective official an elective position

elective

adjective
elec·​tive | \ i-ˈlek-tiv How to pronounce elective (audio) \

Medical Definition of elective

1 : relating to, being, or involving a nonemergency medical procedure and especially surgery that is planned in advance and is not essential to the survival of the patient elective knee surgery elective tonsillectomy
2 : offering or specializing in nonemergency medical procedures and especially surgery elective surgical units
3 : relating to or being a patient receiving a nonemergency medical procedure an elective orthopedic patient

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elective

adjective
elec·​tive

Legal Definition of elective

1a : chosen by popular election an elective official
b : of or relating to election
c : based on the right or principle of election the presidency is an elective office
2a : permitting a choice — compare compulsory
b : available as a choice elective insurance coverage
c : beneficial to the patient but not essential for survival elective surgery

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Comments on elective

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