indignation

noun
in·​dig·​na·​tion | \ ˌin-dig-ˈnā-shən How to pronounce indignation (audio) \

Definition of indignation

: anger aroused by something unjust, unworthy, or mean

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Synonyms & Antonyms for indignation

Synonyms

Antonyms

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Choose the Right Synonym for indignation

anger, ire, rage, fury, indignation, wrath mean an intense emotional state induced by displeasure. anger, the most general term, names the reaction but by itself does not convey cause or intensity. tried to hide his anger ire, more frequent in literary contexts, suggests an intense anger, often with an evident display of feeling. cheeks flushed with ire rage and fury suggest loss of self-control from violence of emotion. shook with rage could not contain his fury indignation stresses righteous anger at what one considers unfair, mean, or shameful. a comment that caused general indignation wrath is likely to suggest a desire or intent to punish or get revenge. I feared her wrath if I was discovered

Examples of indignation in a Sentence

I am eager to concede that in our cataclysmic world this is a little misfortune, arousing even in me only the kind of indignation that could be thoroughly vented in a long footnote somewhere. — Marilynne Robinson, The Death of Adam, (1998) 2005 It's good to bear the preceding in mind when trying to comprehend the indignation with which the East Coast establishment greets work that dares to be both funny and deadly serious in the same breath. — Tom Robbins, Harper's, September 2004 … in his reverie, while his wife swooped back and forth with sheets of last year's leaves and bundles of brisk directives, his brooding mind warmed his old indignation at not having been invited to that party given by his then recently forsaken inamorata. — John Updike, The Afterlife, 1994 The decision to close the factory has aroused the indignation of the townspeople. He adopted a tone of moral indignation.
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Recent Examples on the Web But when protests over the killing of an unarmed black man by police metamorphose into an inchoate revolutionary movement, the original object of righteous indignation has a curious way of fading from view. Matthew Walther, TheWeek, "Requiem for CHAZ," 2 July 2020 And now all this is being processed by many citizens through a different lens – one of deep indignation over a fatal instance of police brutality against George Floyd in Minneapolis. Mark Trumbull, The Christian Science Monitor, "Rising inequality in a crisis: The view from Baltimore," 24 June 2020 Students at Milford Local Schools have also taken to Instagram to voice their indignation with the status quo. Max Londberg, The Enquirer, "'We demand change': Kings, Milford students publish accounts of racist incidents in school," 24 June 2020 Photographer and writer Johnny Silvercloud answered his own question by positing that after the passage of civil rights legislation, those old racists simply went silent, turning off the public spigot of their anger and indignation. Aric Jenkins, Fortune, "Dear white people: The work takes time," 23 June 2020 Collectively, their indignation springs not simply from the perennial impatience of youth. Time, "The Righteous Revulsion Driving the Demands for Racial Change in America," 19 June 2020 In its worst form, the cynical and adept could leverage copper pennies of indignation into lucrative television contracts, speaking gigs, lobbying empires and the like. ... Joseph C. Sternberg, WSJ, "A Wheelbarrow Full of Outrage," 18 June 2020 The toppling is part of a wave of Confederate and Christopher Columbus monuments being removed or forcefully brought down in the wake of national indignation over the in-custody death of George Floyd. NBC News, "Man injured in toppling of Confederate statue in Virginia," 11 June 2020 Gamers' impatience—the release date had been postponed once already—begins to mutate into indignation. Darryn King, Wired, "The Last of Us Part II and Its Crisis-Strewn Path to Release," 10 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'indignation.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of indignation

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for indignation

see indignant

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Time Traveler for indignation

Time Traveler

The first known use of indignation was in the 14th century

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Statistics for indignation

Last Updated

13 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Indignation.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/indignation. Accessed 14 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for indignation

indignation

noun
How to pronounce indignation (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of indignation

: anger caused by something that is unfair or wrong

indignation

noun
in·​dig·​na·​tion | \ ˌin-dig-ˈnā-shən How to pronounce indignation (audio) \

Kids Definition of indignation

: anger caused by something unjust or unworthy

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Comments on indignation

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